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THE 



Color Printer 




A Treatise on the Use of Colors in 
Typographic Printing 



BY 



John F. Earhart 












I 



■ 
I 



Earhart & Richardson 
Cincinnati, Ohio 

1 cS92 






: 



Kntered according to Act of Congress in the year 1892, 

by 

John F. Karhart, 

In the Office of the Librarian of Congress, 

at Washington, D. C. 



rrYefiNm 

LIBRARY 




m 



»J*i<Sfl 



M 




^JO THE PRINTERS OF ALL 
COUNTRIES WHO HAVE 
CONTRIBUTED IN ANY 
DEGREE TOWARD THE ELEVA- 
TION OF + + + + + + + 
THE NOBLE ART OF PRINTING 
+ + + + THIS WORK + + + + 
IS RESPECTFULLY DEDICATED 



i- + 



+ + BY + + i 4- 




( /[ CJ^^ r ^-^-^^ l 




HB 






PREFACE. 




BLIEVING that a work of this char- 
acter has long been needed, the author 
offers this book as a practical guide 
to all printers who desire to obtain 
the most artistic results in ornamental 
Color Printing, by the least amount of labor and 
expense. It has been the aim of the author to 
produce a work showing, in a measure, what can be 
accomplished with common colors, by mixture, by 
printing over one another, by printing over bronzes, 
and by harmonious combinations. 

It is sincerely hoped that this book will answer 
the purpose for which it is intended, and that printers 
everywhere will receive it in a kindly spirit similar 
to that which prompted its production. 






I 






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■■■■■■■■■■■■■ 



Contents. 



PAGE. 

Definitions of Terms, n 

Description of Plate i, 14 

Colors produced by Two-Color Mixtures — Plates 2 to 15, inclusive, . 15 

Colors produced by Three-Color Mixtures — Plate 16, 17 

Description of Mixed Colors, 18 

Half-tone Colors — Plates 17 and 18, 19, 20 

Tints — Plates 19, 20 and 21, 20 

Colors produced by printing Colors over one another — Plates 22 to 

28, inclusive, 20 

Tints produced by printing Tints over one another — -Plates 29 and 30, 21 

Complementary Colors — Plates 31 and 32, 22 

Experiments with Colors, , 23 

Harmony of Colors — Plate 32, 33 

Rules for obtaining Harmonious Combinations of Two or More Colors, 38 
Two-Color Combinations — Plates 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38, 85 and 88, . . 

38, 45, 46, 47, 57, 58 
Combinations of Three or More Colors — Plates 39, 40, 41, 53, 61, 80, 

86 and 89, 44, 47, 48, 51, 53, 56, 57, 58 

Combinations of Three Tones of One Color — Plates 39 and 40, . . 47 
Combination of Three of the Dark Tones of One Color — Plate 40, 

Fig- 288, 47 

Combination of Two Colors which are Complementary, with a Third 

Color, produced by a Mixture of the Two — Plate 41, ... . 48 
Combination of Colors closely related — Plates 39, 40, 42, 48, 53, 61, 80, 

89, and Figs. 302 and 307 on Plate 45, 47,48,50,51,53,56,58 

Combinations of Colors and Tints with Gold Bronze — Plates 42, 43, 

44, 45- 46, 47. 49, 56, 57, 63, 65, 66, and 67, 48, 49, 50, 52, 54, 55 

Combinations of Colors and Tints with Copper Bronze — Plates 48 

and 58, 50, 52 

7 












I 

■ 









mm- 



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s ■ ■■ 



Combinations of Colors and Gold Ink on Colored Enameled Papers page. 

— Plates 50, 51 and 52, 50, 51 

Combinations with Black — Plates 46, 49, 63, 88 and 90, . . 44, 49, 50, 54, 58 
Combinations with Gray — Plates 46, 49, 57, 63 and 67, . . 45, 49, 50, 52, 54, 55 

Description of Plates showing Combinations of Two Colors, .... 45 

Description of Plates showing combinations of Three or More Colors, 47 

Metallic Colors produced by printing Colors on Gold Bronze — Plate 62, 53 
Card showing Thirty-seven Colors produced by Six Impressions — 

Plate 63, 54 

Changes which colors undergo when surrounded by other colors — 

Plates 68 and 87, 55, 57 

Landscape printed in Ten Colors — Plates 69 to 79, inclusive, ... 56 
Specimen of Mapwork printed in Three Transparent Tints over Black 

Plate 90, 58 

Specimens of Embossing Borders — Plates 54 and 55, 51 

Specimen pages ornamented with Embossing Borders — Plates 56 

and 57, 52 

Specimens of Embossing Patterns produced with punches- — Plate 58, 52 

Specimen page showing the use of Embossing Punches — Plate 59, 52 

Specimen of Embossing from Engraved Blocks — Plates 48 and 66, . 50, 55 

Tint Blocks — Plates 81, 82, 83, and 84, 56, 57 

List of Two-Color Combinations including Red, 60 

List of Two-Color Combinations including Yellow, 61 

List of Two-Color Combinations including Blue, 63 

List of Two-Color Combinations including Orange, 64 

List of Two-Color Combinations including Green, 65 

List of Two-Color Combinations including Purple, 65 

List of Two-Color Combinations including Deep Blue, 66 

List of Two-Color Combinations including Rose-lake, 67 

List of Two-Color Combinations including Lemon-Yellow, 68 

List of Two-Color Combinations including Vermilion, 69 

List of Two-Color Combinations including Gray, 70 

List of Two-Color Combinations including Black, 71 

List of Two-Color Combinations including Color No. 17, 72 

List of Two-Color Combinations including Color No. 34, 73 

List of Two-Color Combinations including Color No. 36, 73 

List of Two-Color Combinations including Color No. 41, 74 



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List of Two-Color Combinations including Color 
List of Two-Color Combinations including Color 
List of Two-Color Combinations including Color 
List of Two-Color Combinations including Color 
List of Two-Color Combinations including Color 
List of Two-Color Combinations including Color 
List of Two-Color Combinations including Color 
List of Two-Color Combinations including Color 
List of Two-Color Combinations including Color 
List of Two-Color Combinations including Color 
List of Two-Color Combinations including Color 
List of Two-Color Combinations including Color 
List of Two-Color Combinations including Color 
List of Two-Color Combinations including Color 
List of Two-Color Combinations including Color 
List of Two-Color Combinations including Color 
List of Two-Color Combinations including Color 
List of Two-Color Combinations including Color 
List of Two-Color Combinations including Color 
List of Two-Color Combinations including Color 
List of Two-Color Combinations including Color 
List of Two-Color Combinations including Color 
List of Two-Color Combinations including Color 
List of Three-Color Combinations including Red 
List of Three-Color Combinations including Red 
List of Three-Color Combinations including Red 
List of Three-Color Combinations including Red 
List of Three-Color Combinations including Red 
List of Three-Color Combinations including Red 
List of Three-Color Combinations including Red 
List of Three-Color Combinations including Red 
List of Three-Color Combinations including Red 
List of Three-Color Combinations including Red 
List of Three-Color Combinations including Red 
List of Three-Color Combinations including Red 
List of Three-Color Combinations including Red 
List of Three-Color Combinations including Red 















PAGE. 


No. 


44. • 


76 


No. 


45. 










77 


No. 


52, 










77 


No. 


59. 










79 


No. 


60, 










79 


No. 


67. 










80 


No. 


73, 










81 


No. 


75, 










82 


No. 


80, 










83 


No. 


81, 










83 


No. 


83, 










84 


No. 


94, 










85 


No. 


no, 










86 


No. 


115, 










86 


No. 


118, 










87 


No. 


119, 










88 


No. 


123, 










89 


No. 


135, 










90 


No. 


138, 










9i 


No. 


139, 










92 


No. 


142, 










93 


No. 


144, 










94 


No. 


148, 










95 


and Yellow, 






97 


and 


Blue, . 






98 


and 


Green, 






98 


and 


Deep Blue, . . 


99 


and 


Lemon Yellow, 


99 


and Gray, 


100 


and 


Black, .... 


100 


and Color No. 34, . 


101 


and Color No. 41, . 


101 


and Color No. 45, . 


102 


and 


Color No. 52, . 


102 


and 


Color No. 67, . 


103 


and 


Color No. 75, . 


103 


and Coh 


jr 


N 


0. 


83, ■ 


103 



























■■■I^HilHH 






List of Three-Color Combinations including Red and Color No. no, 
List of Three-Color Combinations including Red and Color No. 135, 
L,ist of Three-Color Combinations including Red and Color No. 139, 
List of Three-Color Combinations including Red and Color No. 148, 
List of Three-Color Combinations including Yellow and Blue, . . . 
List of Three-Color Combinations including Yellow and Purple, . . 
List of Three-Color Combinations including Yellow and Rose Lake, 
List of Three-Color Combinations including Yellow and Gray, . . . 
List of Three-Color Combinations including Yellow and Black, . . . 
List of Three-Color Combinations including Yellow and Color No. 34, 
List of Three-Color Combinations including Yellow and Color No. 36, 
List of Three-Color Combinations including Yellow and Color No. 52, 
List of Three-Color Combinations including Yellow and Color No. 59, 
List of Three-Color Combinations including Yellow and Color No. 67, 
List of Three-Color Combinations including Yellow and Color No. 81, 
List of Three-Color Combinations including Yellow and Color No. 83, 
List of Three-Color Combinations including Yellow and Color No. 135, 
List of Three-Color Combinations including Yellow and Color No. 138, 
List of Three-Color Combinations including Yellow and Color No. 148, 
List of Three-Color Combinations including Blue and Orange, . . . 
List of Three-Color Combinations including Blue and Vermilion, . . 
List of Three-Color Combinations including Blue and Gray, .... 
List of Three-Color Combinations including Blue and Black, .... 
List of Three-Color Combinations including Blue and Color No. 36, 
List of Three-Color Combinations including Blue and Color No. 52, 
List of Three-Color Combinations including Blue and Color No. 73, 
List of Three-Color Combinations including Blue and Color No. 81, 
List of Excellent Three-Color Combinations taken from the Mixed 

Colors on Plates 2 to 21, inclusive, 121, 1 

A Few Hints on Job Composition, 

A Few Hints on Printing Presses, Rollers, Inks, and Papers, . . . . 

Description of Head and Tail Pieces and Initial Letters, 

A Simple Method of Embossing, 



PAGE. 

104 
104 
104 
*o5 

105 
106 
106 
107 
108 
109 
109 
no 
no 
in 
in 

113 
113 
114 
114 

115 
116 
116 
117 
118 
119 
120 
120 

22, 123 
124 
130 

134 
136 



10 









Definitions of Terms. 




RIMARY Colors — Red, Yellow, and Blue are called the 
primary colors, because they are the first or original colors 
from which all others can be made. 

Secondary Colors — Orange, Green, and Violet are called 
the secondary colors, because they are of the second forma- 
tion, each color being produced by a mixture of two of the 
primary colors. The Orange, from red and yellow; the Green, from yellow 
and blue ; and the Violet, from blue and red. 

Tertiary Colors — Russet, Olive, and Citron are called the tertiary 
colors, because they are of the third formation, each color being produced by 
a mixture of two of the secondary colors. The Russet, from orange and 
violet ; the Olive from violet and green ; and the Citron, from green and orange. 
A Full Color is a color in its purest state — one which has not been 
changed by the addition of white or black. The primaries, secondaries, and 
their various hues are full colors. See Plate 32. 

A Hue is a primary or secondary color slightly changed by the addition 
of a neighboring color. For example, a green-blue is a hue of blue ; a blue- 
green is a hue of green. See Plate 32. 

A Tint is a very light or pale color, produced by adding a small quan- 
tity of color to a greater quantity of white. For example see Plates 19, 20, 
and 21. 

A Shade is a dark or broken color, produced by the mixture of a full 
color with gray or black. For example see Figs. 31 to 36, and many others 
throughout this work. 

A Half-tone is a color reduced to about one-half its original strength 
by the addition of white. For example see Plates 17 and 18. 

The Light Tones of a color are the various degrees of color produced by 
the mixture of a full color with white. For example, Fig. 133 on Plate 17, 
and Fig. 149 on Plate 19, are two of the light tones of red. 



11 




m 



The Dark Tones of a color are the various degrees of color produced 
by the mixture of a full color with black. For example, Figs. 35 and 36 on 
Plate 4, are two of the dark tones of red. 

By Color Scale is meant all of the different tones of a color, ranging 
from the darkest shade to the full color, and from the full color to the light- 
est tint. 

A Warm Color is any color in which red or yellow predominates. 

A Cold Color is any color in which blue predominates. 

Complementary Color. — Any color is complementary to another, when 
by a mixture of the two, prismatically, white light is produced. 

Spectral Color.- — A spectral color is the tint which is seen upon a 
white surface, after looking upon a colored object for some minutes. The 
tint will in every case be exactly complementary to the color looked upon. 

Prismatic Colors. — The different colors produced by the refraction of 
the sunlight as it passes through a triangular piece of clear glass called a 
prism. 

The Retina is a delicate membrane inside of the eye, upon which is 
projected by the crystalline lens, the image of any object coming before it. 
In operation the eye is similar to that of the photographic camera. It is said 
that the retina is composed of three sets of fine nerve-fibres intermixed; one 
set being sensitive to the action of red, another to yellow, and the other to 
blue. These nerve-fibres unite in the back part of the eye, forming what is 
known as the optic nerve, which connects the eye with the brain. 




12 






WBESSi 



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. ■■ , 




The Color Printer. 




OR the purpose of avoiding confusion, and that the 
reader may more clearly understand the text, this 
work is based upon the old theory that there are 
three primary colors — red, yellow, and blue. Some 
writers contend that red, green, and blue, are the 
primary color sensations, and others that red, green, and violet are 
the primaries. We think that the experiments which are explained 
on pages 22 to 32, inclusive, tend to prove that the red, yellow, 
and blue theory is correct. It is certainly the most practical 
when applied to pigments, and is, therefore, the most suitable 
for this work. 

To simplify the book as much as possible, we have selected as 
a foundation for it the twelve colors shown on Plate 1, including 
white. These colors were adopted because the writer believes that 
a greater variety of mixed colors can be produced from this selec- 
tion than from any other containing the same number; besides, 
these colors are not only the most useful, but also, the most com- 
mon, and best known among printers. 

We could have added several other useful colors, such as 
umber, sienna, etc., but concluded that it was best to not make the 
work too complicated, and so have adhered to the original idea. 
Very nearly the same result could have been accomplished by leaving 






SS:S: 






out the orange, lemon yellow, vermilion, and gray ; but in that case, 
we would have been obliged to resort to a great many three-color 
mixtures. As it is, we obtain nearly all of the colors desired by 
simple two- color mixtures. This fact makes it much easier for the 
printer to produce any of the mixed colors shown in this book. 

Plate I. — By reference to this Plate, the reader will notice 
that the colors are numbered from i to 12, and on all of the differ- 
ent plates upon which they appear, are referred to by number, 
except in a few instances where the name serves the purpose better. 
In producing the half-tone colors and tints we necessarily used 
white, which is not shown on Plate 1, but is always referred to 
by name. 

The first three colors are the primaries — red, yellow, and blue. 
Then follows the three secondaries — orange, green, and purple. 
Then follows deep blue, rose lake, lemon yellow, vermilion, gray, 
and black. Purple was selected instead of violet, as one of the 
secondary colors, because it lies about half way between the red 
and blue, while the violet is a little too near the blue. One of the 
main objects in making this selection of colors, was to have them as 
far removed from one another as possible, so that we could get a 
greater variety of mixed colors. 

After having decided to adopt the twelve colors just named, as 
a key, or foundation for the work, we had a small quantity of each 
color made, and then tested them thoroughly. Those that were not 
satisfactory were re -made until they were just as wanted. Then we 
had a large quantity of each color made, in fact, enough to print 
the entire work. A few of these colors were returned for slight 
changes, which were easily made. 

After the colors were all satisfactory, we proceeded to find how 
many different colors we could get by two-color mixtures. We first 
mixed Nos. 1 and 2, that is, red and yellow, in different proportions; 
then 1 and 3, 1 and 4, 1 and 5, 1 and 6, etc., until we had run to the 



14 



PLATE 






RED 



YELLOW 



BLUE 






ORANGE 



GREEN 



PURPLE 






DEEP BLUE 



ROSE LAKE 



LEMON YELLOW 






VERMILION 



GRAY 



BLACK 






■a 



..--■'";.■ 



1 

I 



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end of the twelve. Then we mixed Nos. 2 and 3, 2 and 4, 2 and 5, 
etc., to the end of the list. We did the same with 3 and 4, 3 and 5, 
3 and 6, etc., until all of the twelve colors had been tried. The 
result was about one thousand different colors. Then we proceeded 
to select the colors which we desired to show in this book. 

The different colors produced by the mixture of two colors 
would in some instances exceed one dozen. In such cases we would 
select three or four which were as far removed from one another 
and the two colors used to produce them, as possible. For instance, 
Figures 33, 34, 35, and 36, on Plate 4, were made of red and black; 
33 being the nearest to black, and 36 the nearest to red. In some 
instances we selected only one color from the different mixtures of 
two colors; for example, Fig. 28, Plate 3, which is composed of equal 
parts of red and rose lake. 

We will now proceed to show a variety of colors produced by 
two-color mixtures, and explain the manner in which the proper 
proportions of each color were obtained. The reader will please 
note that in speaking of a combination of two or more colors to 
produce another color, we always refer to it as a mixture — a two- 
color mixture, three-color mixture, etc. When using the word 
combination, as two-color combination, we mean an impression of 
two different colors in one figure or design. 

Plates 2 to 15, inclusive. — These plates show 112 colors 
produced by two-color mixtures, from the colors on Plate 1. 












:■; 




In printing these colors the cut represented above was used. It 
was engraved specially to show the effect of each color in solids, 
half-tone lines, quarter-tone lines, and tint lines. 

15 












'4PZ 



As this book is intended specially for printers who use com- 
paratively small quantities of ink, we decided to obtain the different 
proportions by measure instead of by weight. In accordance with 
this idea, we obtained a lot of brass circles of different sizes, and by 
careful tests and filing them down until they were right, finally got 
a dozen which bore the proper proportions to one another, as repre- 
sented by the numbers in the following cut: 




I 



-M 



Then with the addition of a fine marble slab, a half dozen 
small ink knives, and about two hundred quarter- pound cans, we 
were ready to commence mixing the colors. Fig. 13 on Plate 2 was 
the first color made. The reader will please notice that the propor- 
tions are as 1 to 3 in this color. We first laid circles Nos. 5 and 15 
on the slab ; then took color No. 1 and filled circle No. 5 even with 
the top; then color No. 2 and filled circle No. 15 even with the top. 
Then we took a small ink knife in one hand and lifting circle No. 5 
with the other, very quickly got all its contents on to the slab ready 
for mixing, and repeated the operation with circle No. 15. This 
would have been extremely difficult if the measures had bottoms 
to them, but in this case the marble slab was the bottom, and when 

16 




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Plate 2 




13 

I part of I 
3 parts of 2 




14 

I part of I 
I 5 parts of 2 





15 

I part of I 
3 parts of 3 



16 

I part of I 
I part of 3 





17 

5 parts of I 
I part of 3 



18 

1 5 parts of I 
I part of 3 





19 

I part of I 
I part of 4 



20 



I part of 1 
5 parts of 4 



TOKi 



I 






l^^BBa 



Plate 3 




I part of I 
6 parts of 5 




22 

I part of I 
3 parts of 5 




23 

I part of I 
I part of 5 




25 

3 parts of I 
I part of 7 





24 

I part of I 
I part of 7 




26 

6 parts of I 
I part of 7 




I 









27 

1 5 parts of I 
I part of 7 



28 

I part of I 
I part of 8 



■ 



m 




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I 




•'"'.'. '•' - : Mi : :^. i 



Plate 4 




29 

I part of I 
I part of 9 




30 

I part of I 
I part of 10 







31 

I part of I 
5 parts of I I 




32 

I part of I 
I 5 parts of I I 




33 

I part of I 
I part of 12 




34 

3 parts of I 
I part of 12 





35 

7 parts of I 
I part of [2 



36 

I 5 parts of I 
I part of 12 






I 












■ 



4 












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Plate 5 




37 

I part of 2 
7 parts of 3 




38 

1 part of 2 

2 parts of 3 








39 

I part of 2 
I part of 4 




41 

I 5 parts of 2 
I part of 5 






40 

I part of 2 
I part of 5 




42 

I part of 2 
3 parts of 6 



I 



I 





43 

I part of 2 
I part of 6 



44 

3 parts of 2 
I part of 6 






01 



. 




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Plate 6 





45 

I part of 2 
I part of 7 



46 

30 parts of 2 
I part of 7 




47 

100 parts of 2 
I part of 7 




48 

1 part of 2 
I part of 10 




49 

I part of 2 
7 parts of I I 




50 

part of 2 
part of I 2 




3 parts of 2 
I part of 12 




52 

I 5 parts of 2 
I part of 12 






■■'*■ '■-' 



immili 



Plate 7 




53 

3 parts of 3 
I part of 4 




54 

I part of 3 
I part of 4 




55 

I part of 3 
3 parts of 4 




56 

I part of 3 
20 parts of 4 




57 

I part of 3 
I part of 5 




58 

I part of 3 
3 parts of 5 




1 part of 3 

2 parts of 6 




60 

I part of 3 
1 part of 7 







. 




NWVWS^ 



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K«ggBHaHaaMMH|| 



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WBBUi 



JHfl|& 




^^^HHHH BBHHHBHHBHHBBB 



Plate 8 




61 

I part of 3 
I part of 8 




62 

I part of 3 
15 parts of 8 




63 

3 parts of 3 
I part of 9 




64 

3 parts of 3 
I part of 10 




65 

I part of 3 
I part of 10 




66 

I part of 3 
5 parts of 10 




67 

I part of 3 
I part of I I 




68 

I part of 3 
3 parts of I I 



^■IMHHIHH 



Mt'iULl 



Plate 9 





69 

3 parts of 3 
I part of 12 



70 

10 parts of 
I part of 




71 

2 parts of 4 
I part of 5 




72 

I part of 4 
I part of 6 




73 

3 parts of 4 
I part of 6 




74 

I part of 4 
I part of 7 




75 

5 parts of 4 
I part of 7 




76 

I part of 4 
I part of 8 



^riHhnwaa 





■■■■^^^^^^^^^■■■■■■B 




77 

I part of 4 
I 5 parts of I I 




I part of 4 
I parts of 12 




5 parts of 4 
I part of 12 





81 

20 parts of 4 
I part of 12 



82 

2 parts of 5 
I part of 6 




83 

3 parts of 5 
I part of 7 




84 

I part of 5 
I part of 8 



Plate 




85 

I part of 5 
3 parts of 9 




86 

I part of 5 
15 parts of 9 






y 




87 

3 parts of 5 
I part of 10 




I part of 5 
I part of 10 




89 

I part of 5 
3 parts of 10 




90 

I part of 5 
5 parts of I I 




91 

I part of 5 
I part of 12 




92 

5 parts of 5 
I part of 12 







' * .v.,v.v.-v, .,-.-, ,. ,-'-■ -: :*:"•:', ■• 



...... 






Plate 12 




93 

3 parts of 6 
I part of 7 




94 

1 part of 6 
1 part of 8 




95 

1 part of 6 
5 parts of 8 




96 

I part of 6 
7 parts of I I 




97 

2 parts of 6 
I part of 12 




6 parts of 6 
I part of 12 




99 

I part of 7 
I part of 8 




lOO 

I part of 7 
7 parts of 8 




>^ 






Plate 13 




101 

I part of 7 
I part of 9 




102 

I part of 7 
5 parts of 9 




103 

I part of 7 
50 parts of 9 




105 

I part of 7 
3 parts of 10 




104 

I part of 7 
200 parts of 9 




106 

I part of 7 
7 parts of 10 



/ 



1 



: » 







107 

I part of 7 
30 parts of 10 




108 

I part of 7 
15 parts of I I 



$"$ 



■ -Jtl ■ 



'•..-■' 

Si®**-!* 



nhHUBBI 



Plate 14 





109 

2 parts of 7 
I part of 12 



1 lO 



5 parts of 7 
I part of 12 




1 1 1 

10 parts of 7 
I part of 12 




1 12 

I part of 8 
3 parts of 1 I 




1 13 

I part of 8 
15 parts of I I 




1 15 

3 parts of 8 
I part of 12 




1 14 

1 part of 8 
I part of 12 




1 16 

10 parts of 8 
I part of 12 




■■ 



■ 




■ 









OH 



■■HHHHVHBB^^^^^^Sl^H^HH^^^^^H^^nM^HMH^HNHHnv 



Plate 15 




1 17 

I part of 9 
3 parts of I I 




1 18 

2 parts of 9 
I part of 12 




1 19 

10 parts of 9 
I part of 12 




120 

I part of 10 
I part of 1 I 





121 

I part of 10 
10 parts of I I 



122 

I part of 10 
I part of 12 




123 

5 parts of 10 
I part of 12 




124 

15 parts of 10 
I part of 12 



■ 



* 
























-.": 



I 






i 



^^^^HM]HBnH^^H9H^HBB?n^HnHHnD^^HRai^^MHHBHBi^HH 



Plate 16 



» 




125 

3 parts of 3 
I part of 6 
I part of 7 




126 

1 part of 3 
3 parts of 6 
I part of 7 




127 

I part of 3 
5 parts of 10 
5 parts of 12 




128 

3 parts of 5 
I part of 7 

4 parts of 12 




129 

3 parts of 5 

I part of 7 

I part of 12 




130 

4 parts of 6 
I part of 7 
I part of 12 




131 

I part of 6 

5 parts of 8 

5 parts of 12 




132 

2 parts of 7 
2 parts of 8 
1 part of 12 




_ ■ 





I 


































: 





§ 



I 



; 



y 

.;:■-. 









■ ; 



■ 



■■■■I 



NM^M^^HHH^Hi^^H^^H 



■■■■■i 



■■■ 



the circles were raised a great part of the ink stuck to the slab. The 
two inks were then very thoroughly manipulated with a heavy knife 
until they were perfectly united, and the mixture was then put into a 
can which was numbered, and the color registered in a sample book 
made for that purpose. The greatest precautions were taken to 
avoid mistakes, which, of course, would seriously mislead the reader. 

In mixing two or more colors it is of the utmost import- 
ance that everything should be clean. The stone or whatever is 
used to mix the inks upon, should be covered with boiled linseed 
oil, and then thoroughly cleaned with manilla tissue paper. The 
brass circles and the ink knives should be cleaned in the same 
manner. Then, when it comes to the mixing, the operator should 
not stop after he has rubbed the inks together for only a few min- 
utes, but should keep at it, working lively until the inks are 
thoroughly united. Then, if the mixed color does not work well 
and lay smooth on the paper, it will not be on account of neglecting 
one of the most important essentials necessary to obtain that result. 

All of the colors represented on Plate i were made as full 
bodied as they could be, to work well and print smoothly on the 
plate paper used. All of the proportions given for producing dif- 
ferent colors by mixture, are based upon the use of full bodied or 
medium thick inks, and not upon very thin inks. 

The different plates in this work are numbered consecutively 
from i to 90. The different figures shown upon the plates are num- 
bered consecutively from 1 to 403. Kvery mixed color used in this 
book was made by the writer from the twelve colors shown on Plate 
1. Of course, the special colors on Plate 86, and the bronzes and 
gold ink, are not included. 

Plate 16. — This plate shows eight colors produced by three- 
color mixtures from the colors on Plate 1. The object of this 
plate is to show some deep colors, which could not be obtained 
by two-color mixtures. 

17 










• 




Below we give a list of some of the colors shown on the pre- 


1 


ceding plates : 


The Reds are represented by Figs. 13, 19, 20, 28, 29, 30, 76, 





and 95. Fig. 19 is a good orange red, and Fig. 30 a deep vermilion. 
Fig. 95 is a purple -red. 

Figs. 37, 60, 63, 93, 125, and 126 represent Blues. Fig. 37 is 
a greenish blue ; Fig. 60 is an excellent blue ; Fig. 63 is a green - 
blue; Figs. 93, 125, and 126 are violet blues. 

Orange is represented by Figs. 14, 39, 48, and 56. The best 
orange color is made by a mixture of the primaries red and yellow, 
or any red and yellow lying between them. A mixture of rose-lake 
and lemon -yellow will produce a dull orange color, due to the fact 
that rose -lake leans a little to purple, and lemon -yellow to green. 

Green is represented by Figs. 38, 40, 45, 46, 47, 57, 58, 74, 75, 
83, 85, 86, 101, 102, 103, and 104. Fig. 45 is a fine deep green, and 
Fig. 46 is a light yellow-green. Figs. 57 and 58 are blue -greens. 
Fig. 74 is a deep olive, and Fig. 75 is a medium olive. Fig. 83 is 
a fine color which is about half way between blue and green, and 
which can properly be called a sea-green. Fig. 85 is a strong light 
green. The best green is made by a mixture of the primaries yel- 
low and blue, or any yellow and blue lying between them. A mix- 
ture of orange-yellow and violet-blue will produce an olive-green. 

Purple is represented by Figs. 62 and 94. These two colors 
are reddish purples. 

Violet is shown by Figs. 59 and 61, the former being the best 
of the two. It is very hard to produce a good purple or violet by 
mixture of red and blue inks. To obtain the best result, a carmine 
or rose-lake must be mixed with a pure ultramarine blue. 

Brown is represented by Figs. 23, 27, 35, 36, 42, 43, 66, 72, 73, 
88, 89, 107, 120, and 124. Figs. 35 and 36 are fine deep browns; 
Fig. 73 is a leather brown, and Fig. 81 is a sepia brown. Out of 
this list of browns the printer can surely find what is desired. 

18 



^^^^^^^^^^^^"^"^^^^^^^^^^^MWHMBBIlH?w^vgftVProy?WTO ,1 ?. , vw > i''i 



The next is a list of fine Grays, represented by Figs. 31, 32, 49, 
6 7> 68, yy, 90, 96, 108, 113, 117, and 121. Figs. 31 and 32 are red- 
grays; Fig. 49 is a yellow-gray; Figs. 67 and 68 are bine -grays ; 
Fig. yy is an orange-gray; Fig. 90 is a green -gray; Fig. 96 is 
a purple -gray; Fig. 108 is a blue -gray; Fig. 113 is a purplish 
gray made of rose lake and gray; Fig. 117 is a greenish gray made 
of lemon yellow and gray. Fig. 121 is a soft gray made of vermil- 
ion and gray. Without some of these grays it would be simply 
impossible to obtain the most pleasing and artistic results in color 
printing. These colors not only serve to bring out and strengthen 
the positive colors used in combination with them, but also to neu- 
tralize the bad influence of some colors upon others. Colored grays 
are generally most effective in ornamental printing when used as 
backgrounds for panels, bands, etc. 

Blue-black is represented by Figs. 24, 69, 70, 109, no, and 
132. The best of these are Figs. 109 and no, which are made of 
deep blue (Fig. 7) and black (Fig. 12). 

Photo-black is shown by Figs. 33, 114, 122, 127, and 131. 
These colors all lean a little to either red, yellow, or purple. 

Green-black is represented by Figs. 50, 91, 118, 128, and 129. 
Fig. 79 is a good sepia-black. Figs. 97 and 130 are violet- 
blacks. Figs. 16 and 116 are maroons, the latter being the best of 
the two. Fig. 44 is citron. Figs. 26, 34, and 115 are photo -browns; 
the latter is shown in Fig. 343, Plate 60. Fig. 123 is sepia-brown. 
Figs. 87 and 119 are sage-greens. Figs. 17 and 18 are maroon-reds. 
Plate 17. — This plate shows eight half-tone colors produced 
by two-color mixtures of the colors on Plate 1, with white. The 
white ink used in this work, with only one exception, is an opaque 
ink known as zinc white. The only case in which it was not 
used is the specimen of map work shown on Plate 90 ; the three 
tints used in this specimen were made by mixing the colors with 
magnesia, and were printed over the black. Magnesia makes a 
transparent tint, which for purposes of this kind is most useful. 

19 




,::.;'■■■'■■- 



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'■".■>"■' 
,■;;■•. 



Plate 18. — This plate shows eight half-tone colors produced 
by two-color mixtures of different mixed colors with white. Some 
of the best effects in the combination of colors can be obtained 
with half-tone colors, as illustrated on Plates 33 to 37, inclusive. 
Figs. 133, 140, and 145 are half-tone reds. Figs. 135 and 139 are 
half-tone blues. Fig. 138 is a half-tone purple. Fig. 143 is a 
half-tone violet. Fig. 142 is a half-tone blue-green, and Fig. 148 
is a half-tone green-blue. Fig. 144 is a half-tone olive. 

Plates 19 to 21, inclusive. — These plates show a variety 
of beautiful tints. Plate 19 shows ten tints produced by mixtures 
of the colors on Plate 1 with white. Plates 20 and 21 show twenty 
different tints produced by mixtures of different mixed colors with 
white. All of these tints were printed with the cut shown below. 




We tried to produce as great a variety of useful tints as possible, 
and think that the reader will surely be able to get what is desired 
out of this selection. The value of these tints is illustrated in 
many of the combinations of colors shown in this work. 

Plates 22 to 28, inclusive. — These plates show a variety 
of colors, hues, etc., produced by the lapping of different colors of 




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Fig. A. 



Fig. B. 






20 



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Plate 17 



133 

I part of I 
2 parts of White 



134 

I part of 2 
3 parts of White 




135 

I part of 3 
2 parts of White 




136 

I part of 4 
3 parts of White 





137 

I part of 5 
2 parts of White 



138 

I part of 6 
2 parts of White 




139 

I part of 7 
5 parts of White 




140 

I part of 8 
2 parts of White 











I ! 










i^^^^S^^p: 



Plate 18 



■ 

k 







141 



1 part of 17 
3 parts of White 




143 

I part of 59 
2 parts of White 




145 

I part of 76 
2 parts of White 




147 

I part of 94 
2 parts of White 




142 

I part of 45 
3 parts of White 




144 

I part of 75 
3 parts of White 




146 

I part of 89 
2 parts of White 




148 

I part of 1 I 
4 parts of White 



<* 



1» 









■■•■ 












■ : 

■ '\'.Vy '. 









^ 



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i 



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- 









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Plate 19 







149 

I part of I 
40 parts of White 



151 

I part of 3 
30 parts of White 



153 

I part of 5 
20 parts of White 



155 

I part of 7 
100 parts of White 



157 

I part of 10 
30 parts of White 



150 

' I part of 2 
30 parts of White 



152 

I part of 4 
30 parts of White 



154 

I part of 6 
40 parts of White 



156 

1 part of 8 
40 parts of White 




158 

I part of 12 
150 parts of White 








HI 







S-#S 









--.; 




^■^^^I^I^HHaHBMI 



Plate 20 



159 

I part of 14 
15 parts of White 



160 

I part of 24 
150 parts of White 




161 

I part of 38 
30 parts of White 



162 

I part of 47 
I 5 parts of White 



163 



I part of 48 
30 parts of White 



164 

I part of 5 I 
100 parts of White 



165 

I part of 55 
30 parts of White 



166 

I part of 59 
60 parts of White 



167 

I part of 65 
40 parts of White 



168 

I part of 66 
40 parts of White 



I 







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h»!-vv^ 




.. \ ,- V v.. , A^«\\S v ^ 



..■ \ .,■--..■ 



MBBBUm 




169 

I part of 7 I 
15 parts of White 



170 

I part of 75 
40 parts of White 



171 

I part of 83 
60 parts of White 



172 

I part of 85 
I 5 parts of White 



173 

I part of 88 
30 parts of White 



174 

I part of 93 
80 parts of White 






175 

I part of 105 
60 parts of White 



177 

I part of I 18 
80 parts of White 



176 

I part of I 10 
200 parts of White 



178 

I part of 122 
150 parts of White 















■^■■■^■■■■i^M^^^™**^^^**^™^^™ 




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J^^^*nn\\j^§&^ ..so ,■.,.■>.-> a X ■■ .v-: ■-■v-vv--. 






INMNtfMMIHN 



Plate 22 










•♦• 




179 

Red over Yellow 




180 

Red over Green 








181 

Red over Gray 





182 

Red over Blue 




183 

Red over Deep Blue 




184 

Red over Black 



v ? 



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m 



1 1 








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185 

Yellow over Red 



■IB91 


IlilBBll 


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INH 





1 



186 

Yellow over Purple 



S3 


iillllllllllllliliEili 


Nlilllllllllillllllllllllllllllllllllillllllllllllllllllll 


HK9I 



187 

Yellow over Gray 



Plate 23 






I 



188 

Yellow over Blue 





1 


1I1H1I1H5BI1I1II1II 




lllllilll 


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189 

Yellow over Deep Blue 





1 1 iiiiuiiiii 


IIIIIIIIIIUIIIIIIIII 















« 



190 

Yellow over Black 






■■■■■'■'••'••-'••■.•'■ 




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Plate 24 




191 

Blue over Red 




•♦• 




194 

Blue over Yellow 





192 

Blue over Orange 








195 

Blue over Rose Lake 




193 

Blue over Gray 




196 

Blue over Black 



n 

it 
■ ii 







197 

Orange over Blue 




198 

Orange over Green 




lllllllll 



199 

Orange over Gray 



Plate 25 




200 

Green over Red 




201 

Green over Purple 




202 

Green over Gray 




;■ 




in 



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wmmm 



.,...,,.■ 






• 





•♦• 



203 

Purple over Yellow 



Plate 26 





206 

Deep Blue over Red 




204 

Purple over Green 




205 

Purple over Gray 








•♦• 



207 

Deep Blue over Yellow 













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208 

Deep Blue over Rose Lake 



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Plate 27 




•♦• 




209 

Rose Lake over Yellow 



imHHMI 


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212 

Rose Lake over Blue 





210 

Rose Lake over Green 




21 1 

Rose Lake over Gray 




213 

Rose Lake over Deep Blue 








214 

Rose Lake over Black 



! 



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PLATE 2£ 





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lllliiilllill 




215 

Gray over Red 




218 

Black over Red 





216 

Gray over Yellow 




217 

Gray over Blue 




•♦• 



■ 



219 

Black over Yellow 




220 

Black over Blue 



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&^S^$$M^$^^ 4^SS > ,::-.^.^-.-:^-.xsx:^ 







Plate 29 






221 

156 over 150 



222 

156 over 155 



223 

156 over 158 




224 

150 over I 55 



225 

150 over 156 



226 

150 over 158 











227 

155 over I 50 



228 

155 over 156 



229 

155 over 158 



! 

! 



fSfmS* 



HHM^^HMI^^^^MiH^^MM^^^HBB^^H^MI^^^^^H^^^^BI^^^^^fl 



■mi 



HH^BBlHi^HI 







111 








































230 

153 over 150 























233 

152 over 155 



Plate 30 



231 

153 over 155 



232 

153 over 156 




234 

152 over 156 



235 

[52 over 158 











236 

158 over 150 



237 

158 over 156 



238 

158 over 155 






-■■■'"'■'■ r' 



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Plate 31 





239 



240 




241 






242 



243 



' ■■■i : : 



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■....■■■■...■..:...... •■ ..,.■■. 



Plate i over one another in lines and solids. In printing these 
illustrations two different cuts were used. Fig. A was printed 
first, and then Fig. B was printed on top of Fig. A, but shifted 
half an inch to the right. 

The reader will notice that the cuts are engraved to show the 
result of printing solids over solids; half-tone lines over half-tone 
lines; tint lines over tint lines; solids over quarter-tone lines, and 
quarter- tone lines over solids. These seven pages will certainly 
prove to be of special value to all printers who employ engravers or 
who do label work. For example, Fig. 200 clearly illustrates what a 
label printer can accomplish with two good colors. 

Plates 29 and 30. — These two plates show a variety of tints 
produced by the lapping of different tints over one another in 
lines and solids. Two different cuts were used in printing these 
illustrations. Fig. C was printed first, and then Fig. D was printed 
on top of it, but shifted one- quarter of an inch to the right. These 



/ \ 







1 



Fig. C. 



Fig. D. 



cuts were engraved to show the result of printing solids over 
solids; half-tone lines over half-tone lines, and tint lines over 
tint lines. Good use of these effects can be made, not only in fine 
label work, but also in elegant card work, or ornamental printing 
of any description. For example we refer the reader to the speci- 
men cards on Plates 49 and 67. 



21 






n^^rasi 







Complementary Colors. 




LATE 31. — This plate is intended to specially 
illustrate a number of very interesting experiments 
showing that certain colors are complementary, 
and also the influence of colors over one another. 
Before giving an explanation of the experiments 
referred to, it is probably best to call the reader's attention to 
the meaning of the word complementary as applied to colors. 
When the mixture of any two colors produces white light 
they are said to be complementary. This is true of prismatic 
colors, but it is impossible to obtain white by the mixture of 
complementary colors in printing inks or paints. There is quite 
a difference of opinion between the best authorities as to what 
colors are exactly complementary. After many careful experi- 
ments we have concluded that the following colors, as represented 
on Plate 32, are complementary : 

Red and Sea-green. 
Yellow and Violet. 
Blue and Orange. 
Green and Red -purple. 
Purple and Yellow-green. 

22 



■\v ■.:■■..■ 






It is generally believed that green is the complement of red, 
but this belief is mainly due to the fact that it was advocated by 
Chevreul, the celebrated French chemist. Maxwell and Von Bezold 
say that blue -green is the complement of red, while Church, Rood, 
and others, say green -blue is its complementary. The experiment 
explained on pages 23 to 26 will show that the complement of 
red is a color which lies about half way between green and blue, 
and which, for convenience, we will call sea-green, the name 
preferred by some writers. This color is frequently seen at night 
in its most brilliant state, in the show-windows of some drug 
stores, produced by a light shining through a glass globe filled 
with a solution of ammonia and sulphate of copper. 






EXPERIMENTS WITH COLORS. 

The complement of any color can be easily obtained by look- 
ing very intently at the color selected for about one minute, and 
then suddenly shifting the vision to a white surface, upon which 
will be seen a pure tint of the complement of the color just looked 
at. This being true, then it follows that when we place together 
two colors which are complementary and view them at the same 
time, there will be seen when the eyes are shifted to a white surface, 
a tint of each color transposed — that is, the complement of one 
color will be the actual tint of the other ; for illustration the reader 
will turn to Fig. 239, Plate 31, which represents red and its comple- 
ment sea-green. To obtain the best results in these experiments 
the instructions must be followed closely. 

You will now cover Figs. 240, 241, 242, and 243 with a white 
sheet of paper, leaving Fig. 239 and the black dot on the right ex- 
posed. Then hold your eyes about twelve or fifteen inches above 
the page and look steadily (without winking, if you can) at the black 
dot in the center of Fig. 239 for a half minute; then instantly shift 

23 



I ■ 



your eyes to the black dot on the right, and look at that a few sec- 
onds ; then shift back again to the dot on Fig. 239 and look at that 
a half minute; then again to the dot on the right for a few seconds, 
*and after repeating these movements three or four times, finally 
look steadily at the dot on the right, and you will see a beautiful 
tint of the complement of red, and also a tint of the complement of 
sea-green, just the size and shape of Fig. 239. The reader will 
observe that the red tint is below the sea-green tint, which is just 
the reverse of the position of the colors in Fig. 239. If the two 
tints produced by this experiment are similar to the actual tints of 
the colors which call them into view, then the colors shown in 
Fig. 239 are complementary. If this experiment be tried with 
Fig. 242, the reader will find that the complement of green is a 
reddish purple. 

Now cover all of the figures except 239 and 241. Repeat the 
experiment just described, shifting the vision alternately between 
the black dot on Fig. 239 and the white dot on Fig. 241, finally 
allowing the eyes to rest on the white dot. In this case you will 
see deep shades of the complements of red and sea-green instead of 
tints as in the first experiment. Try this experiment with Fig. 242 
and you will see deep shades of the complements of green and red- 
dish purple. 

We will now show the effect of looking at a color for several 
minutes, then suddenly looking upon its complement for a few 
seconds. The result will be that the color last looked at will appear 
almost as brilliant as a prismatic color. First cover all of the fig- 
ures except 239 and 240. Then look very intently at the black dot 
on Fig. 239; after the colors have become somewhat dull to the eye, 
suddenly shift the vision to the dot on Fig. 240. The result is most 
pleasing, as the colors in the latter figure seem to be increased in 



*The movements described are repeated for the purpose of building up, or making 
stronger the complementary tint which is called into view. 

24 



.-..■.,..:■.-,. 






brilliancy tenfold. The reason for this apparent change in the 
colors, is that after looking upon a colored object for some minutes, 
that part of the retina of the eye upon which the color makes an 
impression becomes fatigued, and the complement of that color 
takes its place upon the retina. It is a fact that from the instant 
that we first look upon any color, its complement immediately 
begins to take its place upon the retina of the eye, and the* 
longer we look upon a color, the duller it will become, and the 
stronger its complement will appear when we look upon a white 
surface ; and if we look upon a color which is the complement of the 
color first looked at, the effect is just the same as when we print a 
transparent red over red, or a transparent blue over blue, etc. ; the 
color will appear much more brilliant. This experiment can be tried 
with Figs. 242 and 243 with a pleasing result. 

We will now give an experiment for the purpose of showing 
that a mixture of prismatic complementary colors will produce white 
light. The tint which comes into view after looking at a colored 
object, is really the same as a prismatic color, only it is not so 
strong. The reader will again cover all of the figures on Plate 3 1 
except 239 and 240. Then look at the dot on Fig. 239 for a sec- 
ond, then at the dot on Fig. 240 for a second, and keep shifting the 
eyes at regular intervals of a second each, from one to the other for 
a half minute; then suddenly look at the dot between the two 
figures, and there will be seen a clear white figure surrounded by 
gray. The white is produced by an equal mixture of the complements 
of the colors in Figs. 239 and 240 upon the retina of the eye. The 
reader will observe that the colors in the two figures are purposely 
reversed for the benefit of some of the experiments. This experi- 
ment can also be tried with Figs. 242 and 243 with a pleasing result. 

If the same experiment be applied to the three primary colors 
properly balanced, the result will be white; also the secondaries 
properly balanced will produce white by this experiment. 

25 



Si I ! 






timBEmM 



Another experiment showing that sea-green (which is an 
equal mixture of green and blue) is the complement of red, is 
shown by mixing the spectral complements of green and blue upon 
the retina of the eye ; see illustration below. 








After shifting the eyes at regular intervals of a second each 
from one to the other of the black dots upon the two colors named, 
for a half minute, then suddenly looking at the black dot between 
the two, we will see a pure tint of red, which is produced by an 
equal mixture upon the retina, of a red-purple tint (the complement 
of green) with an orange tint (the complement of blue). This 
experiment plainly shows that the complement of red is a color 
which is an equal mixture of green and blue. 

Maxwell, Church, and Rood all agree that blue and yellow 
are complementary, instead of blue and orange as advocated by 
Chevreul. We think that blue and orange are complementary, 
and that the following experiments prove the correctness of our 
position ; see illustration below. 





26 









K 



By looking upon the bine fignre for some minntes and then 
suddenly shifting the vision to the dot on the right, there will be 
seen a pure orange tint ; and if we look upon the orange figure 
for some minutes and then suddenly shift the vision to the dot on 
the left, we will see a pure blue tint; and, finally, if we shift the 
vision at regular intervals of a second each, from one to the other 
of the two colors named, for a half minute, and then suddenly look 
at the dot between the two, we will see a clear white figure sur- 
rounded by gray. The white is produced by an equal mixture of 
the complements of blue and orange upon the retina of the eye ; 
the fact that this experiment produces white, proves that the two 
colors are complementary. 

Another very good method of finding the complement of 
any color is illustrated by the following experiment — see the 
orange figure on page 26. Take a slip of white paper in one 
hand, and while looking very intently at the dot upon the orange 
figure, suddenly move the slip up to the dot, hold it there a few 
seconds, and then withdraw it for a quarter minute ; repeat these 
movements three or four times, but while doing so, keep looking 
intently at the dot. Each time the slip is moved up to the dot, 
that part of it which covers the orange figure will show a most 
beautiful blue tint. This experiment also shows that blue is 
complementary to orange. 

We will give another experiment as additional proof that 
orange (which is an equal mixture of red and yellow) is the 
complement of blue, by mixing the spectral complements of red 
and yellow upon the retina of the eye; see illustration on page 28. 

After shifting the eyes at regular intervals of a second each 
from one to the other of the two colors named, for a half minute, 
then suddenly looking at the black dot between the two, we will 
see a pure tint of blue, which is produced by an equal mixture upon 
the retina, of a sea-green tint (the complement of red) with a violet 

27 




■I^H 



■■1 



tint (the complement of yellow). This experiment plainly shows 
that the complement of blue is a color which is an equal mixture of 
red and yelloiv. 








Any two colors which are complementary will produce white 
when subjected to the experiment just described. If it be applied 
to any two colors shown in the chromatic circle which are not 
complementary, then the result will be different, and instead of white 
we will see a tint which is produced by an equal mixture of the 
complements of the two colors upon the retina, and which in 
every case lies about half way between the complements of the 
two colors selected. For example, say we try orange and violet 
— see illustration below. After shifting the eyes at regular 
intervals of a second each, from one to the other of the two colors 
named, for a half minute, then suddenly looking at the black dot 
between the two, we will see a pure green tint, which is an equal 
mixture of a blue tint (the complement of orange) with a 
yellow tint (the complement of violet). 





28 




By applying this experiment to different pairs of colors shown 
in the chromatic circle on Plate 32, we obtain the results indicated 
by the table on page 30. 

We will now try sea-green and red-pnrple. After shifting the 
eyes at regular intervals of a second each, from one to the other of 
the two colors named, for a half minute, then suddenly looking at the 
black dot between the two, we will see a pure yellow lint, which is 
an equal mixture of a red tint (the complement of sea-green) with a 
green tint (the complement of red-purple). See illustration below. 





It will be noticed that by the mixture of the complements of 
orange and violet {blue and yellow) in the eye, we reach the same 
result as in the mixture of blue and yellow pigments — green. But 
by the mixture of the complements of sea-green and red-purple 
{red and green) in the eye, we get yellow, while the mixture of 
red and green pigments produces brown. If the eyes are allowed 
to rest upon the orange twice as long as upon the violet, the 
result will be (when we look at the dot between the two) we will 
see a tint in which blue, the complement of orange, will strongly 
predominate; and if we allow the eyes to rest upon the violet 
twice as long as upon the orange, then we will see a tint in which 
yellow, the complement of violet, will predominate. This rule 
will also apply to any pair of colors given in the following table; 
also to any pair which may be selected from the chromatic circle 
on Plate 32. 

29 



• 









MnHHIM 



By an Equal Mixture upon the Retina 
of the Eye of the Complements of 



We Obtain a 
Pure Tint of 



— v/ 

Red and Yellow . 


Blue. 


Red 


' Bine 


Green-yellow. 


Red 


Blue -violet 


Yellow-green. 


Orange ' 


Green 


Violet. 


Orange ' 


' Violet . 


Green. 


Yellow ' 


' Blue 


Red-purple. 


Bine ' 


' Green 


Red. 


Sea-green ' 


' Red-purple 


Yellow. 


Sea-green ' 


Orange -yellow 


Purple. 


Bine-green ' 


' Violet . 


Orange. 



It is a curious fact that by the mixture of any two prismatic 
colors which are represented in the chromatic circle on Plate 32, the 
result will always be a color which lies between the two colors used. 
If the two colors are about equal in strength then the resulting 
color will be found about half way between the two ; for example, by 
the mixture of the prismatic red and yellow we get orange, the 
same as in the mixture of pigments ; so it is with red and blue, 
which produces violet; yellow and blue, which produces green. 
But by the mixture of the prismatic red and green we get yellow ; 
while the mixture of red and green pigments produces brown. And 
by the mixture of the prismatic green and violet we get blue ; while 
the mixture of green and violet pigments produces an olive. Also 
by the mixture of the prismatic orange and purple we get red ; 
while the mixture of orange and purple pigments produces a russet. 

By the mixture of prismatic colors which are complementary 
the result will always be white ;. and by the mixture of prismatic 
colors which are nearly complementary the resulting tint will always 
be nearly white. It follows then, that in the mixture of two pris- 

30 






iasSwS 



• 



matic colors, the strongest tint will be produced when the colors 
bear a close relation to each other; for example try red and orange, 
orange and yellow, yellow and green, green and blue, etc. 

The foregoing experiments, in our judgment, tends to 
disprove the theory advocated by Young, Helmholtz, Maxwell, 
Church, Rood, and others, that red, green, and blue, are the 
primary color sensations ; also the theory of some writers who 
claim that red, green, and violet, are the primaries. These experi- 
ments really strengthen the theory advocated by Brewster and 
Chevreul, that red, yellow, and blue, are the true primary colors. 

In the selection or use of colors we must not lose sight of the 
fact that any object which is looked at immediately after viewing a 
colored surface, will be slightly changed in color by the complement 
of the color of that surface. For example, say we have been look- 
ing at a bright sea-green color and we suddenly look upon a 
yellow surface; as red is the complement of sea-green, the yellow 
will be slightly changed by red toward orange. We again look 
upon the sea-green color for some minutes, and then suddenly 
look upon a blue object; in this case the red will change the 
blue toward violet. Again, we look at the sea-green for a few 
minutes, and then suddenly look upon a black object ; in this 
case the black will be changed toward brown, because red over 
black makes brown. 

If a black object be viewed upon a white surface, and then the 
eye is suddenly shifted to a white surface, there will be seen a 
clear white figure surrounded by gray. If a white object be viewed 
upon a black surface, and then the eye is suddenly shifted to a black 
surface, there will be seen a deep black figure surrounded by a gray- 
ish black. 

In the use of colors we must always keep in mind the fact 
that any color occupying a small area of surface, when surrounded 
by another color occupying a much larger surface, will be strongly 

31 



■I 



ranH 



tBtUSBBm 



tinted with the complement of the surrounding color. For example, 
see Fig. 354, Plate 68; the word contrast is printed in a pure 
gray ink, and is exactly registered into the blue cut. The reader 
will perceive that where the letters are surrounded by blue they 
are strongly tinted with orange; but where they are surrounded 
by white, they show their real color — gray. Fig. 355 on the same 
plate shows the word contrast printed in gray and surrounded by 
red. In this case the gray is very strongly tinted by sea-green 
the complement of red. 



Any color occupying a small area of surface, when surrounded by 
another color occupying a much larger surface, will be strongly 
tinted with the complement of the surrounding color. 



If surrounded by Red 

If surrounded by Orange 

If surrounded by Yellow 

If surrounded by Yellow-green ' 

If surrounded by Green 

If surrounded by Sea-green ' 

If surrounded by Blue 

If surrounded by Violet 

If surrounded by Purple 

If surrounded by Red-purple ' 



the color will 
be tinted with 



Sea-green. 

Blue. 

Violet. 

Purple. 

Red-purple. 

Red. 

Orange. 

Yellow. 

Yellow-green. 

Green. 



Very brilliant colors are influenced less by surrounding colors 
than the more quiet ones; gray being affected more than any other 
color. 




32 



HMB 







Harmony of Colors. 




E will now turn to Plate 32, which is equal in 
importance to the key plate. Plate 1 is the 
key to the mixture of colors, and Plate 32 is 
the key to the correct combination of colors. 
Plate 32. — This plate represents the 
colors of the solar spectrum, arranged in a circle so as to bring 
colors which are complementary directly opposite to each other. 
In combining colors there is a wide difference of opinion as to 
what is correct and what is not. Of course, when harmony is 
produced, that is certainly correct. But the question with printers 
the world over is : what rule can be safely followed to obtain 
harmonious results in the combination of colors ? The writer 
confidently believes that the color chart on Plate 32, with the 
rules and explanations which follow, will in a great measure fill 
this very long-felt want. 

Having made a close study of the works of the best writers 
upon the subject of color, during the past six years, and also, 
having made a great many original experiments in the combina- 
tion and mixture of colors in the same time, we reached the 

33 



conclusion that there are eight different harmonies of colors, and 
have arranged them into two series, as follows : 

First Series — Harmonies of Related or Analogous 
Colors, which includes: 

i. The Harmony of Scale — by Contrast of Tone. 

2. The Harmony of Scale — by Gradation of Tone. 

3. The Harmony of Relative Colors — by Contrast of Tone. 

4. The Harmony of Relative Colors — by Gradation. 

5. The Harmony of a Dominant Color. 

Second Series — Harmonies of Unrelated or Contrary 
Colors, which includes : 

6. The Harmony of Distant Colors — Equal in Tone. 

7. The Harmony of Distant Colors — by Contrast of Tone. 

8. The Harmony of Colors with black. 

By Harmonies of Related or Analogous Colors is 
meant the harmony of two or more colors, in each of which, one 
color is plainly perceptible. For example, orange and purple are 
near relatives of red, while orange-yellow and violet-blue are distant 
relatives of red; and the different tones and hues of red are its 
nearest relatives. 

The Harmony of Scale — by Contrast of Tone is produced by 
the combination of two or more tones of one color, between which 
there is a decided difference. For example, see Figs. 284, 285, 
and 286, Plate 39, which shows three different three-color com- 
binations of full-tones, half-tones, and tints; also Figs. 287, 288, 
and 289, on Plate 40. Fig. 287 is composed of one of the light, 
and two of the dark tones of red; Fig. 288 is composed of three of 
the dark tones of yellow; Fig. 289 is composed of a dark tone, 
full -tone, and half-tone of red. Also, Plate 42 which shows olive 
and its tint, and Plate 48 which shows sea-green and its tint. 

34 



^^^M 



244 



Scale of Complementary Colors. 



Plate 32 




The Harmony of Scale — by Gradation of Tone, is produced 
in two ways. First — by the combination of three or more tones of 
one color blended into one another, and showing a gradual increase 
or decrease in depth of tone; for example, the cut on Plate 61 was 
printed in three different tones of orange blended into one another. 
This harmony is best illustrated in the colors of the rose, and 
is frequently seen in the leaves of some plants and trees. 
Second — by the combination of three or more tones of one color, 
gradually increasing or decreasing in depth of tone, and showing a 
slight difference in depth between any two adjacent tones; for 
example, see the borders at top and bottom of Plate 80, which were 
printed in rose-lake and three of its light tones. 

The Harmony of Relative Colors — by Contrast of Tone, is 
produced by the combination of two or more colors which are 
somewhat closely related, and between which there is a decided 
difference in tone; for example, see Fig. 389, Plate 85, which 
shows a combination of deep violet-blue and light yellow-green, the 
former being a hue of blue, and the latter a hue of green. Fig. 
388 shows a violet-blue and yellow-green about equal in tone, 
making a poor combination, because the contrast of tone is very 
weak. 

The Harmony of Relative Colors — by Gradation, is produced 
in two ways. First — by the combination of two or more related 
colors or hues blended into one another, and showing a gradual 
change from one color to another — the colors being arranged in 
their natural order as represented on Plate 32; for example, see 
the borders at top and bottom of Plate 89, which were printed 
with yellow, green, and blue, blended into one another. This 
harmony is best illustrated by the colors of the rainbow, and is 
frequently seen at sunset, the sky being a reddish-orange color 
at the horizon, and gradually blending, as you look higher, into 
delicate tints of yellow, green, blue, and violet. Second — by 

35 




: 






1 













the combination of three or more related colors or hues, showing 
a gradual change from one color to another, with a dividing line or 
border separating the colors from one another ; for example, take 
any third section of the chromatic circle on Plate 32. 

The Harmony of a Dominant Color is produced by a com- 
bination of colors, in which one of them predominates to such an 
extent that it gives the whole design or figure the appearance of 
being delicately tinted with that color. This harmony is best 
illustrated by viewing a pleasing combination of colors through a 
delicately tinted glass. It is also frequently seen in spectacular 
plays, when a colored light is thrown upon a scene which is com- 
posed of a harmonious arrangement of colored objects. An imper- 
fect illustration of this harmony can be had by viewing Plates 49 
and 67 through the tinted sheets which precede them. 

By Harmonies of Unrelated or Contrary Colors, is 
meant the harmony of two or more colors which are not related to 
each other — and which are, therefore, located some distance from 
each other in the chromatic circle. For example, red is not related 
to yellow or blue, or any color lying between them ; yellow is not 
related to red or blue, or any color lying between them ; and blue 
is not related to red or yellow, or any color lying between them. 
The Harmony of Distant Colors — Equal in Tone, is produced 
by the combination of two colors which are complementary, or 
nearly so — each being about equal in depth of tone; for example, 
see Figs. 245, 251, 264, 274, and many others in this work. 

The Harmony of Distant Colors — by Contrast of Tone, is 
produced by the combination of two colors which are comple- 
mentary, or nearly so, and between which there is a decided 
difference in tone; for example, see Figs. 256, 257, 258, 262, 263, 
266, 269, and others in this work. Fig. 313, Plate 46, is a fine 
example of the harmony of distant colors — by contrast of tone; it 
shows a combination of six colors and gold. 

36 






... . 



Plate 33 



-"iimiiiiMiiiimiiiii 




MIIIIHI 



:XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXT 
245 

81 and 148 






246 

32 and 171 



247 

44 and 17 1 



|^l"""l||i I||i j I|l'""i|||i""i|||i' |1 III" 1 "!!!"""!!!! 1 



► 



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"III"""!!! I| III 1 ""!!!!! |l" | H| I|||M"II|| ll|j|l| 



llll ill Il till lilt Ill I lIlllnllllllNnllIll ||il 



248 

18 and 85 




**7 



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Sv? 



ffi 







249 

71 and 156 



250 

90 and 156 



'■until 



„;xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxrj 




illlllll. 



251 

73 and 148 



Two-Color Combinations. 



l^^jgMM^^M^^^^MMMj^^^Mj^MM^^^MI .:-"";:• >-\-'^-v^- 




t^vit t^Btt i^&t i^aw t^ett )^w 



253 

31 and 41 



254 

138 and 41 



ai||i' l| il|||i'">i|||ii"H||l i|||i""i|p'"i|||l""l|||i III"""!!! I|l 

= M 

- 




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"ii|ii'"ii|||ii"ii|| || i||n || | || lip i|ji i||i| 



1 1 i I : I ! , i i I : . . , < i i I llhimlll I Il Ill ili„,,i|lliF 



255 

3 and 4 








256 

144 and 157 



257 

142 and 157 



CXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX}, „„„„„„„,„„„ uiiiiiiiiii... 




xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx: 

258 

36 and 148 




Two-Color Combinations. 



: 






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Plate 35 



nTmlmMiiiimiimiiilmiil^ 

259 

73 and 142 







^!j^l)w^%J®)^J 



260 

41 and 154 




261 

71 and 154 



^l]|i""i||l i||l''""l||i'""l|l"""l|l I|l> I||i""i||l I||i""i||l"' 



rjj jM mm wmmm mm g 



Sill lIlLilllllniillll lllliiulllllli.illll Illmullllinilllll l! 




262 

I and 148 






263 

44 and 16 1 



264 

149 and 16 1 



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ttx^xxxxxxxxxxxx^xxxxxxmxrfr ill,imi ni " mm " lm ""■ 



265 

95 and 142 



Two-Color Combinations. 



,1 







M^^^M^^MM^M ^MM^MB 



. 



Plate 36 



"iiiimiiimiiiiiii 

"•iiiiTiiWfiiiminififitfiiiTiiffrilfiiifci.'."*^** - '" , ^ v "'~""*'~ ■ " ' ~"* mm " J > ^f 1IT1I iTfTi 1 1 1 1 1 ■ 1 1 1 i n i n i n i n i n n 1 1 1 1 1 1 ■ • • ■ 

266 

36 and 85 







267 

146 and 155 



268 

78 and 155 



V ' 



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269 

83 and 140 





270 

143 and 134 



271 
135 and 134 



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rcrxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxixxxxxxxxxxl 




IIM1M 



272 

29 and 144 



Two-Color Combinations. 





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Plate 37 






Minim- 




n ^ x " , ^ u tfxn%cn xx xmniz ziznn i& 




273 

75 and 140 





274 
36 and 52 



275 

89 and 139 



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276 

6 and 85 





277 
67 and 2 




278 

57 and 48 



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279 

I 16 and 142 



Two-Color Combinations. 



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Plate 38 



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ffl + ® + (1 + ® + ® + ®H* 
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280 

3 and 77 




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281 

4 and 68 



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+03 +03 +03 + 1! + ®+ 
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282 

59 and 49 



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283 

5 and 96 



Two-Color Combinations. 



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284 

75, 144 and 170 





















































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285 

8, 140 and 156 




^p^l^iHi^a^ 



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286 

7, 139 and 155 

Three-Color Combinations. 






i .1 



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t':.>v 



Plate 40 




287 

36, 32 and 149 





•-•-•-•.•.< 















- • • • * * ♦ • • + ♦ • •*♦ ♦♦♦♦*«** •"• v."» « . . ♦ 4 4 ;v.r* ^ 




I 





288 

50, 5 1 and 52 














TTTTrrnm 






W 


















289 

34, 1 and 133 

Three-Color Combinations. 



1 



: 






■ 








■ 



! 

I 












■ ■ 



Plate 41 




290 

I, 83, and both combined. 








291 

3, 4, and both combined. 




I I 



■ 









292 

6, 46, and both combined. 

Three-Color Combinations. 







^H^HHBHHHHB 



HHV 



m \ ] M 






i 



















The Harmony of Colors with Black, is produced by the com- 
bination of black with the full tones or light tones of the warm 
colors, and also, with the light tones of the cold colors; for 
example, black and the full tone of yellow ; or black and the light 
tone of violet. In the former case the contrast is very strong, but 
in the latter it would be very weak if the violet was not made 
lighter in tone. 




37 



■ 






i 




■H 



I 







Rules for obtaining Harmonious Combinations of 
Two or More Colors. 



I 










K will again turn to the scale of complement- 
ary colors on Plate 32. This scale, or chart, 
was arranged with the greatest care, so that 
colors which are complementary would be 
exactly opposite to each other. If the reader 
desires to get the strongest combination possible, with any one 
of the colors shown in this chart, he must take the color directly 
opposite to the one selected. If red be the one selected, then its 
opposite, sea-green, will make its strongest combination. It is 
hard for the printer nowadays to get out a job of color printing 
without using red in some form. It is certainly the most 
important color with which we have to deal. That being the 
case, we will first give the colors which will harmonize with red. 

TWO-COLOR COMBINATIONS. 

Red will harmonize with either of the two primaries, yellow 
or blue, and also with any one of the colors lying between them, in 
their normal state, or when reduced with white, or modified with 

38 









gray, or darkened with black. The writer thinks that red forms the 
strongest combination with any one of the colors lying between 
green and blue reduced to a half-tone with white; for example see 
Fig. 262, Plate 35. 

Yellow will harmonize with either of the two primaries, blue 
or red, and also with any one of the colors lying between them, in 
their normal state, or when reduced with white, or when slightly 
modified with gray. The reader will perceive that a very strong 
contrast exists between yellow, which is the lightest and most lumi- 
nous color in the chart, and violet, its complement. In fact, when 
combining yellow with any of the colors which lie between red and 
blue on the opposite side of the circle, it is not best to make the 
contrast more violent by the addition of black to any of these colors; 
instead, a more pleasing combination will be obtained by the addition 
of white to the color selected, thus reducing the violence of contrast. 
For example, the contrast between the violet and yellow is very 
strong. If the violet be reduced with white to a half-tone color, 
the combination will be much more pleasing, because we then get not 
only harmony of colors, but also a harmonious contrast of colors. 

Blue will harmonize with either of the two primaries, red or 
yellow, and also with any one of the colors lying between them, in 
their normal state, or when reduced with white, or modified with 
gray, or darkened with black. Blue makes the most effective com- 
bination with any one of the colors lying between red and yellow. 
Its best combination is orange ; see Fig. 255, Plate 34. 

Orange will harmonize with any one of the colors lying be- 
tween green and violet, in their normal state, or when reduced with 
white, or when slightly modified with gray. Orange makes the best 
combination with any one of the colors lying between sea-green and 
blue-violet. For example see Fig. 255, Plate 34. 

Green will harmonize with any one of the colors lying 
between violet and orange, in their normal state, or when reduced 

39 




■ 



I 







I 



I 






with white, or modified with gray, or darkened with black. The 
best combination with green is its complement, red-purple. See 
Fig. 242, Plate 31. 

Purple will harmonize with any one of the colors lying be- 
tween orange-yellow and sea-green^ in their normal state, or when 
modified with gray, or darkened with black, or when the greens are 
reduced with white. The best combination with purple is its com- 
plement, yellow -green. For example see Fig. 276, Plate 37. 

In two-color combinations the reader can safely follow this 
rule — that any color shown in the Scale of Complementary Colors 
will form a good combination with any one of the seven colors on 
the opposite side of the circle, in their normal state, or when re- 
duced with white, or modified with gray, or darkened with black. 

To obtain the best result in the combination of two tones of 
one color, or two tones of different colors, always combine a full 
color with a dark tone, or a full color with a half-tone, or a half- 
tone with a very light tone. By following this rule a violent con- 
trast of tone will be avoided. 

In combining two hues, a primary color should show plainly 
in each hue. For example, when a hue of blue and a hue of green 
are combined, the blue should be moved toward violet and the green 
toward yellow — that is, in opposite directions on the chart. This 
would make a combination of violet -blue and yellow -green. See 
Fig. 389, Plate 85. The best result will be obtained if a primary 
color predominates in each hue. For example see Fig. 390, Plate 85, 
which shows a combination of violet-blue and green-yellow ' ; blue 
predominates in one color and yellow in the other. 

In nearly all of the best two-color combinations it will be 
found that they are really complementary colors, somewhat modi- 
fied by the addition of other colors or black. 

All specimens of monochrome printing (that is, printing in 
different tones of one color), belong to the harmony of scale. 

40 




Plate 42 




•a 
c 



0) 



o 
O 

« 



Pale Gold and Two Colors. 







! 




PUMP 






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: 



I 



I 









r^WBMI^H 



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K^SSSSSK 



Plate 44 








295 

155, Gold and 81 



296 

163, Gold and 139 



pttSKS 




irf • i -rm- 1 •HrK : -rwi- 1 Aitt- : •ijrr- : -Hr 



*^*^*ffi*^*ffi*^» 



m ^vvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvy^ 




297 

44, 68 and 18 




298 

83, Gold and 80 




Tl u^^^vvvvvvxvxvvvvvvvvvvvvy p 



H*B*E* 




E3 y^sssssvyvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvv E 



299 

13, 52 and 61 




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^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ " m 1 ^- ^ — ^^ »» sssss' r mr y ^ g " yy 





300 

172, Gold and 73 



301 

154, Gold and 40 



Combinations of Colors and Tints with Gold. 






H 



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I 



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, 


















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ri 



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Plate 45 




fflillilffllm 



302 

150, Gold and 7 1 



303 

174, Gold and 78 




®®®®®®®®® 




!®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®«®®l 



304 

144, Gold and 138 





305 

71, 142, Gold and I 15 





306 

139, Gold and 20 





307 

170, Gold and 144 



308 

157, Gold and 137 



Combinations of Colors and Tints with Gold. 















a*' 



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f 










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Plate 46 



310 




3, 71, 157, Gold and Black 



312 




®®®®®®©®©® 



138, 170 and Gold 



309 




170, 156, Gold and Black 



313 



31 1 




41, 138, 83, Gold and Black 





153, 157 and Gold 



315 



1,80, 148, 152, 162, Gold and Black 



316 




5, 153, 156, Gold and Black 



317 






41, 157, Gold and Black 



Combinations of Colors and Tints with Gold. 






1 












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Plate 47 



JT/ /If" V^BiSBBjHf ..M| 

.. . .... ..... ^/ ¥ /«f \f//miiuif wm^ 




+ + + + + + + + + +[ §K^3+ ^ + + + + + + + + + 4- 


Tnc Louis Sf|der's Sons Co. 
PAPER MAKERS 

183 & 185 W. FOURTH ST. 

FRANKLIN 

Fair Grove riMflMM ATI 

AND FORDHA/n MILLS OOOOO V^INv^IInN/vII 

All of the paper in this book was purchased from above firm.— Editor Color Printer. 


+ + + + + + + + + + +[+ + + + + + + + + + + + + 





318 

Butterfly: 78, 143, 2, 36, 83, Gold and I 14 
Card : 155 and 7 



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The combination of colors which are complementary, while 
not always the most pleasing, is snre to produce the strongest con- 
trast; for example see Figs. 239 and 242, Plate 31; also Figs. 255, 
Plate 34; 262, Plate 35; 276, Plate 37, and many others. For bold 
and effective work the combination of complementary colors can 
not be excelled. 

By the combination of two colors which are complementary, 
each color gains in fullness, while the combination of two colors 
which are not complementary, will cause each color to move a 
little toward the complement of the other. 

The combination of cold and warm colors always results in 
the warm colors appearing warmer and the cold ones colder. 

All of the primary colors are increased in strength and full- 
ness, when combined with white on a gray ground. 

When there is a lack of harmony or contrast between any two 
colors, they should be separated by a band of black, white, gold, or 
some neutral color which will harmonize with both. 

A very effective two-color combination is obtained by combin- 
ing a primary or secondary color with its complementary gray — that 
is, a gray to which its complement has been added. For example, 
see the figures on Plate 38. Fig. 280 is a combination of blue and 
orange- gray ; Fig. 281 shows orange and blue -gray; Fig. 282 shows 
violet and yellow -gray ; and Fig. 283 shows green and purple- gray. 

Black will form a good combination with any color lying be- 
tween red and blue on the right side of the circle. The light tones 
of blue should be used in combination with black, otherwise the con- 
trast will be weak. 

Black forms its best combination with orange -red or vermil- 
ion. A common mistake with printers generally, is the combining 
of a purple -red or rose -lake with black. Purple -red or rose -lake 
will combine well with black, only after the black has been moved 
toward green by the addition of green or yellow. 

41 




m 

■ \ 



■^ 



Gray will form good combinations with any of the colors 
shown in the circle, especially the ones lying between red and 
green; its best combinations being yellow, and the light tones of 
red, orange, and green. 

COMBINATIONS OF THREE OR MORE COLORS. 

In many of the best three-color combinations it will be found 
that they are really combinations of the primary colors in a modi- 
fied form ; that is, red predominates in one color, yellow in another, 
and blue in the other. For example, the red may be modified with 
gray, or shaded with black, or moved toward orange or purple ; the 
yellow may be modified with gray, or shaded with black, or moved 
toward orange or green ; the blue may be modified with gray, or 
shaded with black, or moved toward green or purple. In the com- 
bination of the three primary colors modified, they should always be 
moved in the same direction around the circle; that is, if the red be 
moved toward purple, then the yellow must be moved the same 
distance toward orange, and the blue the same distance toward 
green. If the red be moved toward orange, then the yellow must 
be moved the same distance toward green, and the blue the same dis- 
tance toward purple. This rule will also apply to any combination 
of three colors shown on Plate 32. 

Red will harmonize with the other two primaries, yellow and 
blue; also with yellow and green- blue, yellow and violet-blue, green- 
yelloiv and blue, green-yellow and violet-blue, and yellow-green and 
violet-blue. If the red be moved a little toward purple, or a little 
toward orange, then the other colors in the combination must be 
moved an equal distance in the same direction around the circle, so 
that they will be at the same relative distance from each other as 
before the change in the red. Any of the pairs of colors named will 
form a good combination with red, in their normal state, or when 
reduced with white, or modified with gray, or darkened with black. 

42 



■■■■■■■HnMi^BB^H^^XI 






^^^^^^s^^^^^^^^^^^^ 



Yellow will harmonize with the primaries, red and blue ; also 
with, purple -red and blue, orange-red and blue, orange-red and vio- 
let-blue, purple-red and green-blue, and red- purple and sea-green. 
Any of the pairs of colors named will form a good combination with 
yellow, in their normal state, or when reduced with white, or modi- 
fied with gray, or darkened with black. 

Blue will harmonize with the primaries, yellow and red ; also 
with yellow and purple- red, yellow and orange-red, green-yellow 
and red, green-yellow and purple-red, and green-yelloiv and orange- 
red. Any of the pairs of colors named will form a good combina- 
tion with blue, in their normal state, or when reduced with white, 
or modified with gray, or darkened with black. 

Orange will harmonize with green and violet, green and pur- 
ple-violet, blue- green and violet, blue- green and purple -violet, sea- 
green and purple -violet, and sea-green and purple, in their nor- 
mal state, or when reduced with white, or modified with gray, or 
darkened with black. 

Green will harmonize with violet and orange, violet and 
orange -red, blue -violet and orange-red, and purple-violet and 
orange, in their normal state, or when reduced with white, or 
modified with gray, or darkened with black. 

Purple will harmonize with orange and blue- green, orange 
and sea-green, yellow -orange and blue -green, yellow -orange and sea- 
green, and orange-yellow and sea-green, in their normal state, or 
when reduced with white, or modified with gray, or darkened with 
black. 

In three-color combinations the reader can safely follow this 
rule — that any three colors shown in the Scale of Complementary 
Colors, will form a good combination when they are selected as 
far from one another as possible. There should be at least four 
colors between any two colors on the warm side of the scale, and at 
least five colors between any two colors on the cold side of the scale. 





^ 






43 



ISI^^H^^HII^^H 



For example, in the combination red, yellow, and blue, there are 
four colors between red and yellow, six colors between yellow and 
blue, and seven colors between blue and red; in the combination 
purple -red, green-yellow, and violet- blue, there are six colors be- 
tween purple -red and green -yellow, six colors between green -yellow 
and violet -blue, and five colors between violet -blue and purple -red. 



COMBINATIONS WITH BLACK. 

In the use of black, there is one point the reader must not lose 
sight of; and that is, that black should be combined with a cold 
color, only after the cold color has been reduced with white. 

The following is a list of good three-color combinations, in- 
cluding black : 

Black, red, and yellow. 

Black, red, and green -yellow. 

Black, red, and 3^ellow- green. 

Black, red, and the light tones of green, blue -green, sea- 
green, green-blue, and blue. 

Black, orange-red, and green-yellow. 

Black, orange -red, and yellow-green. 

Black, orange-red, and the light tones of green, blue-green, 
sea-green, green -blue, and blue. 

Black, orange, and yellow-green. 

Black, orange, and the light tones of green, blue -green, sea- 
green, green -blue, blue, and violet -blue. 

Black, yellow -orange, and the light tones of blue -green, sea- 
green, green-blue, blue, violet-blue, and blue-violet. 

Black, orange -yellow, and the light tones of sea-green, green - 
blue, blue, violet-blue, blue-violet, and violet. 

Black, yellow, and the light tones of green -blue, blue, violet - 
blue, blue-violet, violet, and purple-violet. 

44 



• '• -«^v^.-f ■ •>•!.- 



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HNWWMm 



Plate 48 



z 
o 

01 

Q 

a: 

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I 
o 



v> 



c/5 




LU 
UJ 

UJ 



CO 



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as. 
UJ 

a. 
C/5 



UJ 




CO 
CO 

T3 
C 

re 



0) 
CO 



a 
a. 
o 
O 




Copper Bronze and Two Colors. 












MflMf 







I "^j$$tw-ps^^ 






Black, green -yellow, and the light tones of blue, violet-blue, 
blue-violet, violet, purple -violet, and purple. 

Black, yellow-green, and the light tones of violet-blue, blue- 
violet, violet, purple -violet, purple, red-purple, and purple-red. 

Black, red and green -gray. 

Black, red and blue -gray. 

Black, orange -red and green -gray. 

Black, orange -red and blue -gray. 

Black, light green and purple -gray. 

Black, light green and red -gray. 

Black, light blue and yellow -gray. 

COMBINATIONS WITH GRAY. 

Gray will form a good combination with any two colors which 
are complementary or nearly so. It is the happy medium between 
black and white. Any color seen upon a black ground will appear 
paler ; when seen upon a white ground it will appear deeper ; but 
when seen upon a gray ground it will appear at its true value. For 
example see Figs. 399 and 400, on Plate 87. 

In forming combinations of three different colors, it is gener- 
ally most effective to combine a full- color, a half- tone, and a tint ; 
or a deep -shade, & full- color, and a half-tone. The reason is, that 
in such combinations we have harmony of contrast as well as har- 
mony of colors. 

DESCRIPTION OF PLATES SHOWING COMBINATIONS OF TWO COLORS. 

Plates 33 to 38, inclusive, show a variety of fine two-color com- 
binations which belong to the harmony of distant colors. 

Plate 33. — Fig. 245 on this plate is a combination of one 
of the dark tones of orange and a light green-blue. Fig. 246 is 
composed of red-gray and a sea-green tint. Fig. 247 is composed 
of a light brown and a sea-green tint. Fig. 248 is composed of 

45 






I 

: 








a purplish hue of red and a light green — a strong combination. 
Fig. 249 is composed of a sage-green and a rose-lake tint. Fig. 
250 is composed of a green-gray and a rose-lake tint. Fig. 251 
is composed of a light red-brown and a light green-blue. 

Plate 34. — Fig. 252 on this plate is composed of a fine bright 
red and a light green-blue. Fig. 253 is composed of a red-gray 
and a green-yellow. Fig. 254 is composed of a half-tone pur- 
ple and a green-yellow. Fig. 255 is composed of the complementa- 
ries, blue and orange. Fig. 256 is composed of a half-tone olive 
and a flesh tint. Fig. 257 is composed of a light blue -green and a 
flesh tint. Fig. 258 is composed of one of the dark tones of red 
and a light green -blue. 

Plate 35. — Fig. 259 is composed of a light red-brown and 
a light blue -green. Fig. 260 is composed of a green -yellow and 
a purple tint. Fig. 261 is composed of a sage-green and a pur- 
ple tint. Fig. 262 is composed of red and a light green-blue — a 
very strong combination. Fig. 263 is composed of a light brown and 
a pearl tint. Fig. 264 is composed of a red tint and a pearl tint. 
Fig. 265 is composed of a purple -red and a light blue -green. 

Plate 36. — Fig. 266 is composed of one of the dark tones of 
red and a light green — an excellent combination. Fig. 267 is com- 
posed of a light brown and a blue tint. Fig. 268 is composed of a 
gray -orange and a blue tint. Fig. 269 is composed of sea-green and 
a half-tone rose-lake — a strong combination. Fig. 270 is composed 
of a light violet and a half-tone yellow. Fig. 271 is composed 
of a half-tone blue and a half-tone yellow. Fig. 272 is composed 
of a light red and a half-tone olive — an excellent combination. 

Plate 37. — Fig. 273 is composed of olive and a half-tone 
rose -lake. Fig. 274 is composed of a dark tone of red and a dark 
tone of yellow — a good combination. Fig. 275 is composed of a 
light brown and a half-tone blue. Fig. 276 is composed of purple 
and light green — a very good combination. Fig. 277 is composed 

46 




!■■■■■■ 1 ^ 



;:--!k,?a- 



■: .■' : ■■-.': .' : 'v -^v-'' 



of a blue -gray and yellow. Fig. 278 is composed of blue -green 
and orange. Fig. 279 is composed of one of the dark tones of 
rose -lake and light blue -green — a good combination. 

Plate 38. — Fig. 280 is composed of blue and orange -gray. 
Fig. 281 is composed of orange and blue -gray. Fig. 282 is com- 
posed of violet and yellow -gray — a good combination. Fig. 283 
is composed of green and purple -gray — a splendid combination. 

The assortment of splendid two-color combinations just de- 
scribed, were selected with great care. Some of the figures are 
composed of full colors, and others of half-tones or tints. In 
selecting any of these combinations for use in fancy printing, 
consisting of type, borders, etc., it is best to print the type matter 
in the deepest or darkest of the two colors used. Sometimes an 
ornamental initial letter, or a bold display line, will look better if 
printed in the lighter of the two colors. 








DESCRIPTION OF PLATES SHOWING COMBINATIONS OF THREE 

OR MORE COLORS. 

Plate 39. — This plate shows three three-color combinations, 
which are good examples of the harmony of scale — by contrast of 
tone. A combination of different tones of one color is always 
pleasing, it matters not what color may be used. This is very 
properly called monochrome printing. Fig. 284 is composed of 
olive in the full -color, half-tone, and tint. Fig. 285 is composed 
of rose -lake in the full-color, half-tone, and tint. Fig. 286 is 
composed of deep blue in the full-color, half-tone, and tint; this 
is a very effective combination. 

Plate 40. — This plate also shows three three-color combi- 
nations, good examples of the harmony of scale. Fig. 287 is 
composed of two of the dark tones and one of the light tones of red. 
Fig. 288 is composed of three of the dark tones of yellow. Fig. 289 
is composed of red in the full-color, half-tone, and a dark tone. 

47 




Plate 41. — This plate shows three three-color combinations; 
in each figure two of the colors are complementary, and the third 
color is a mixture of the two. Fig. 290 is composed of red, sea- 
green, and black; the latter was produced by a mixture of the red 
and sea-green shown in this figure. Fig. 291 is composed of 
orange, blue, and an olive produced by a mixture of the two. Fig. 
292 is composed of purple, light green, and a color produced by 
a mixture of the two. 

Plate 42. — This plate contains only one specimen — Fig. 293 ; 
it is composed of one of the dark tones of yellow, its tint, and pale 
gold. This combination belongs to the harmony of scale. 

Plate 43. — This plate shows a very elaborate specimen — Fig. 
294 — printed in gold and eight colors. In the feather, the gold was 
printed first; then the green; then the reddish purple; then the 
maroon-red; then the deep blue, and finally the sea-green. The card 
and border was printed in color No. 51 and its tint, and a sea-green tint. 

Plate 44.— This plate contains some elegant combinations of 
gold and two colors. Fig. 295 was first printed in a blue tint, then 
in gold, and then in one of the dark tones of orange. Fig. 296 was 
first printed in a flesh tint, then in gold, and then in a half- tone of 
deep blue. Fig. 297 is a combination of the three primaries — red, 
yellow, and blue, modified by mixture with other colors. Fig. 298 is 
a splendid combination of sea-green, gold, and one of the dark tones 
of orange, printed in the order named. Fig. 299 is a combination 
of the three primaries — red, yellow, and blue, modified by mixture 
with other colors. Fig. 300 was first printed in a delicate green tint, 
then in gold, and then in a light red -brown. Fig. 301 was first 
printed in a purple tint, then in gold, and then in a light green. 

Plate 45. — This plate also contains some splendid combina- 
tions of gold and colors. Fig. 302 was first printed in a yellow 
tint, then in gold, and then in a sage green ; this is a good example 
of the harmony of relative colors — the colors, including gold, being 

48 



tv : . 



■■■■■Hi 






JHEBIi^lHHHBiHI^HI 



;■; , • ' 



■ ^,*-:-~' ' 



Plate 49 










TYPg 



MITH 



1 /> 







4t N«> / 

4 / :- 






320 

Gold, 163, 156, 158 and Black 



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VAN E---.BCR 



GINGINN, 



to Order Promptly ■ — 










321 

Gold, 151, 162, 158 and Black 



Combinations of Gold, Black and Three 




nt 



Plate 41. — This plate shows three three-color combinations; 

in two of the colors are complementar} and the third 

ture of the two. Fig. 290 is composed of red, sea- 

and bl ck; the latter was produced by a mixture of the red 

sa- green shown in this figure. Fig. 291 ii composed of 

, blue, and an olive produced by a mixture of the two. Fig. 

is coinp ed of purple, light green, and a color produced by 

a mixture of the two. 

Plate 42. — This plate contains only one speci 293; 

it is composed of one of the dark tones of r, it pale 

gold. This ombination belongs to the h 

Plate 43. — This plate shows a very elaborate : ;;-.cimen — Fig. 

294 — printed in gold and eight colors. In the feath the gold 

printed first; then the green; then the reddish purple; then the 

maroon -red; hen the deep blue, and finally the sea-green. The card 

and border wa printed in color No. 51 and its tint, and a'sea-green tint. 

Plate 44. — This plate contains some elegant uations of 

gold and two colors. Fig. 295 was first printed in ; tint, then 

in gold, and then in one of the dark tones of orange. Fig. 296 was 

first printed in a flesh tint, then in gol If- tone of 

deep blue. Tig. 2 combination c red, 

yellow, and blue, modifie fixture with other col Pig. 298 is 

bination of sea-green, gold, and one of the dark tones 

of orange, printed in the order named. Fig. 299 is a combination 

rimaries — red, yellow, and blue, modified by mixture 

■ . >rs. Fig. 300 was first printed in a delicate green tint, 

then in gold, and then in a light red -brown. Fi; 

■ : urple tint, then in gold, and then in 1 

Plate 45. — This plate also contains some s 

of gold and colors. Fig. 302 was first print 

it, then in gold, and then in a sage green; this is 

he karmo, v of relative colors — the colors, including gold, being 

48 



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320 

Gold, 153, 156, 158 and Black 




"The Best is the Cheapest." 



PRINTERS # # 
• # ROLLERS 








VAN BIBBER 
& GQ 



ROLLER 
I COMPOSITION 

Sixth and Vine Sts 



CINCINNATI, OHIO 







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334 

45, 10, White and Gold Ink 




335 

7, 45, 10, White and Gold Ink 



Combinations of Cold Ink and Colors on Black Enameled Paper. 







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Plate 53 



THE BEST IS THE CHEAPEST. 3 ' 



H 




VAN BIBBERS REGULAR COMPOSITION 

30 CENTS PER POUND. 

The Old Reliable. Too well and widely known to need description. 



VAIN BIBBERS PRESSMAN'S COMPOSITION 

35 CENTS PER POUND. 

The best composition of the recasting class made anywhere in the world. 

Melts and pours easily. Recasts easily. Never shrinks, cracks or loses suc- 
tion or elasticity. Cold has but little effect on its hardness. Especially designed 
for the qualities desired in form rollers having a direct roll. 

This composition is of a bright, green color, so it can be easily distinguished 
and blamed if deserving of blame. 



♦ ROUGH-AND-READY- 

35 CENTS PER POUND. 

The cheapest roller material sold anywhere. Sold everywhere throughout North 
and South America. It makes good, durable rollers. 



Van Bibber's Rollers used exclusively in printing this book. — Editor Color Printer : 




Sixth and Vine Sts., Cincinnati, Ohio, U. 8. A. 



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153, 172 and 8 1 



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nearly related to yellow. Fig. 303 was first printed in a pearl tint, 
then in gold, and then in one of the dark tones of orange. Fig. 
304 is a fine combination of two colors which are nearly complemen- 
tary, and gold ; the half- tone olive was printed first, then the gold, 
and then the half-tone purple. Fig. 305 is composed of a sage- 
green, a light blue -green, gold, and a deep photo -brown, printed 
in the order named — making a splendid combination. Fig. 306 
was first printed in a half-tone of deep blue, then in gold, and 
then in a light red. Fig. 307 was first printed in an olive tint, 
then in gold, and then in a half-tone olive; this specimen 
belongs to the harmony of scale. Fig. 308 was first printed in a 
flesh tint, then in gold, and then in a half-tone green. 

Plate 46. — This plate contains nine different combinations of 
gold and colors. Fig. 309 was first printed in an olive tint, then in 
a rose -lake tint, then in gold, and then in black. Fig. 310 was first 
printed in blue, then in sage-green, then in a flesh tint, then in 
gold, and then in black. Fig. 311 was first printed in a greenish 
yellow, then in a half-tone purple, then in sea-green, then in gold, 
and then in black. Fig. 312 was first printed in a half-tone purple, 
then in an olive tint, and then in gold. Fig. 313* was first printed 
in red, then in one of the dark tones of orange, then in a light 
green -blue, then in gray, then in a primrose tint, then in gold, and 
then in black — making a splendid combination. In this design the 
light green -blue was treated in two different ways — -by printing an 
open border over it in black, causing it to appear more blue, and by 
printing an open border over it in gold, causing it to appear more 
green. Fig. 314 was first printed in a green tint, then in a flesh 
tint, and then in gold. Fig. 315 was first printed in green, then in 
a green tint, then in a rose -lake tint, then in gold, and then in 
black. Fig. 316 was first printed in purple, then in a sage-green, 




*The number 152 which is printed below Fig. 313, represents an orange tint; it 
should have been number 11, which represents gray. 

49 









-*■ iMfla 





then in an olive tint, then in gold, and then in black. Fig. 317 was 
first printed in a greenish yellow, then in a flesh tint, then in gold, 
and then in black. 

Plate 47. — The only design shown on this plate is Fig. 318, 
which represents a butterfly and business card. This is a splendid 
example of the harmony of distant colors. It was not the 
intention of the writer to stick very close to nature in coloring 
this butterfly, but instead we aimed to show an odd, and at the 
same time a correct combination of colors. We believe that 
printers everywhere will be well pleased with not only the com- 
bination, but also with the excellent presswork shown in this 
specimen. The first color printed in the butterfly was No. 78, 
one of the dark tones of orange; then a half-tone violet, then 
yellow, then one of the dark tones of red, then sea-green, then 
gold, and then a deep photo -black. The card was first printed in 
a blue tint with an electrotype taken from emery paper, and then 
in a deep blue. 

Plate 48. — Fig. 319 on this plate was first printed in a sea- 
green tint, then in copper bronze, and then in sea-green; it was 
then embossed with a box -wood plate made with steel punches. 

Plate 49. — This plate contains two specimens of cards 
printed in gold, three tints, and black. Fig. 320 was first printed 
in gold, then in a green tint, then in a rose -lake tint, then in a gray 
tint, and then in black. Fig. 321 was first printed in gold, then in 
. a blue tint, then in an orange tint, then in a gray tint, and then in 
black. In both of these cards some very fine tints are produced by 
printing the gray tint over the rose, green, blue, and orange tints. 

Plate 50. — This plate, as well as the two following, is in- 
tended specially to show printers some good results in printing 
gold ink and colors on colored enameled cover papers. Fig. 322 
was first printed in a purplish red, then in color No. 80, which is 
one of the dark tones of orange, and then in gold ink. By refer- 

50 



HHM 



• 



Plate 54 









337 



I.. ■ 



Sample page of Embossing Borders and Corner Pieces. The borders are made 
in two, three and four-em pica widths, and four, eight and twelve-em pica lengths. 







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ring to Plate 10, the reader will see that Fig. 80 is a rather dark 
color, in which black predominates ; but when printed on the deep 
green paper, the orange predominates. Fig. 324 was first printed 
in a purplish red, then in a deep blue, and then in gold ink. Fig. 
326 was first printed in No. 80, then in a deep blue, and then in 
gold ink. These splendid effects can be used to great advantage on 
fancy covers for catalogues, and other work of a similar character. 

Plate 51. — The figures on this plate are printed the same as 
Plate 50, except that a deep green was used in place of the purplish red. 
Fig. 327 was first printed in color No. 45, which is a deep green; 
then in No. 80, and then in gold ink. Fig. 329 was first printed in 
a deep green, then in deep blue, and then in gold ink. Fig. 331 
was first printed in No. 80, then in deep blue, and then in gold ink. 

Plate 52. — This plate shows some excellent results, obtained 
by printing gold ink and colors on black enameled paper. We have 
used some odd figures on this plate, merely suggestive of some of 
the uses which can be made of this paper. Fig. 332 was first 
printed in a deep green, and then in gold ink. Fig. 333 was first 
printed in deep blue, and then in gold ink. Fig. 334 was first 
printed in a deep green, then in vermilion, then in white, and 
then in gold ink. Fig. 335 was first printed in deep blue, then 
in a deep green, then in vermilion, then in white, and then in gold 
ink. To obtain the best result in printing red and white on black 
paper, the inks must be opaque, so that they will cover the black as 
completely as possible. The same rule will apply to yellow or any 
other luminous color. 

Plate 53. — Fig. 336 on this plate was first printed in a green 
tint, then in a yellow-green tint, and then in one of the dark tones of 
orange. This specimen is an example of the harmony of relative 
colors. 

Plates 54 and 55. — These plates show nine different patterns of 
embossing borders, made in two, three, and four-em pica widths, and 

51 






* 





four, eight, and twelve-em pica lengths. The corner pieces are made 
in two, three, and four-em pica squares. The manner of embossing 
with these borders is fully explained in another part of this work. 

Plate 56. — This plate represents a business card printed in 
gold and three colors, lying across a page framed with an embossed 
border. The first color printed was a gray tint as a solid ground 
for the page above and below the card; then the orange tint was 
printed solid in the card, and as a figured pattern on the inside of 
the page over the gray tint; then the gold was printed in solid 
bands on the card ; then figured borders were printed in green over 
the gold bands ; then all of the type matter and the outlines of the 
card were printed in color No. 81, which is one of the dark tones of 
orange. Finally, the embossing border was printed in a pearl tint, 
and embossed at the same time. The card is an excellent example 
of the harmony of relative colors — all of the colors, including gold, 
being closely related to yellow. 

Plate 57. — This plate represents a handsome cover page, 
printed first in gray, then in gold, then in a figured sea-green 
tint over the gray, then in deep blue, and then in one of the dark 
tones of red ; the gold bands were then embossed. 

Plate 58. — Fig. 341 on this plate was first printed in a light 
green, and then in copper bronze. It was then embossed with a 
box- wood plate, containing nine different patterns made with soft steel 
punches. The outlines of the plate were cut with a round graver. 

Plate 59. — This plate was first printed in a flesh tint and 
then in one of the dark tones of orange. The sheet was then em- 
bossed with a plate made with four of the punches used on Plate 58. 

Plate 60. — This plate shows an imitation of both sides of 
leather paper, embossed. Fig. 343, representing the right side, was 
printed in a deep photo -brown, and was then embossed with an 
electrotype, taken from a sheet of embossed tin used by trunk - 
makers ; the type matter was then printed over it in green bronze. 



52 



T L 



Plate 55 





338 



Sample page of Embossing Borders and Corner Pieces. The borders are made 
in two, three and four-em pica widths, and four, eight and twelve-em pica lengths. 



■ fl^^MMM 



. 




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I 



Fig. 344, representing the wrong side, was printed in a manilla 
color and embossed from an electrotype taken from the other 
side of the tin mentioned above. 

Plate 61. — The figure upon this plate was first printed in 
orange and two of its dark tones blended . together ; then the type 
matter and borders at the sides were printed in its darkest tone. 
This combination belongs to the harmony of scale. 

Plate 62. — This is a most interesting plate, showing a great 
variety of handsome colors produced by printing the colors red, 
blue, yellow, gray, and black, in lines and solids over gold bronze 
printed in lines and solids. The reader will probably find on this 
plate many effects in printing which he has not seen before. We 
will not explain each one separately, as the matter printed below 
each figure makes this unnecessary; we will, however, show the 
cuts which were used to produce the figures printed in four colors. 
For example, the fourth figure to the right of black, showing black 
on blue on red on gold, was printed with the cuts below, in the 
order named: 




iipiipiiipi 

llll 









gold. 



red. 



blue. 



black. 



The cuts were specially engraved to show the colors in solids, 
half-tone lines, and tint lines. The different colors were produced 



53 





by printing solids over solids, half-tone lines over half-tone lines, 
and tint lines over tint lines. Kach of the nine colors on the right 
side of the plate were produced by printing half- tone lines in two 
colors over one another on solid gold. The five pairs of colors at 
the bottom of the plate were produced by printing colors in half- 
tone lines over gold solids, and in solids over half-tone gold lines. 
A score or more of fine metallic colors are produced by printing one 
or more colors over solid gold. Some of the colors on this plate 
look very much like fine cloth goods with golden threads inter- 
woven. The reason for this is because the lines in no two of the 
cuts run in the same direction. In the first cut they are perpendic- 
ular; in the second, horizontal; in the third they run diagonally 
from the right, down to the left; and in the fourth they run diag- 
onally from the left, down to the right, so that when the four cuts 
are printed over one another, each color is plainly visible ; especially 
so if the reader will examine any one of the figures on Plate 62 
with a small magnifying glass. We believe that a greater number 
of fine effects in .color printing has never been produced by six 
impressions. 

Plate 63. — The card on this plate is a good illustration of 
the use of the effects shown on Plate 62. The same colors were 
used, printed in the order named. In this card we aimed to pro- 
duce, with a few impressions, a great variety of colors arranged in 
harmonious groups; some of the most effective are the dull metal 
colors, produced by printing colors over gold bronze. For example^ 
the reader will refer to the numbers 3, 6, 12, 9, 17, 29, and 35 in the 
key -form on Plate 64. 3 represents a reddish copper produced by 
printing red over gold. 6 represents a steel blue produced by print- 
ing blue over gold. This card is a fine example of the harmony of 
distant colors. 

Plate 64. — This plate represents the key- form of the card on 
the preceding plate. It was set up altogether in type and brass 

54 



■■ 



■ 



1 



SfiSMsj 



mMM 



.,. .... ^,, m 



rule. We used the pansy in this card, because it is a flower that 
frequently contains both the primary and secondary colors, if 
the leaves are included. The location of the different colors pro- 
duced by printing the colors named in lines and solids over one 
another, is indicated by numbers ranging from i to 37, inclusive. 

Plate 65. — This plate was first printed in a blue-gray, then 
in a yellow gold, and then in one of the dark tones of red — making 
an effective combination. 

Plate 66. — This plate represents a program card, and the 
first page of a menu card, lying on a sheet of stippled paper. It 
was first printed in an olive tint, then in gold, then a light red, and 
finally in one of the dark tones of orange; then the words "menu" 
and "program" were embossed. The ornamental bands at the top 
and bottom of the menu page are excellent specimens of color com- 
bination. 

Plate 67. — Fig. 351 on this plate is a fine specimen of card 
work, printed in gold and four colors. The first impression was 
pale gold; then a sea-green tint was printed; then a flesh tint; 
then a gray tint, aud finally one of the dark tones of red. 

Plate 68. — The figures on this plate are intended to show 
the effects produced upon different colors, by placing them in con- 
trast with the different tones of other colors. Fig. 352 shows red 
surrounded by the different tones of black; the result is that the 
letter C which is surrounded by solid black appears much lighter 
than the letter R which is surrounded by a half-tone black; and 
the letter C appears very much lighter than the letter T which is 
surrounded by white. The same will apply to Fig. 353 which 
shows yellow in contrast with black, Fig. 354 which shows gray in 
contrast with blue, and Fig. 356 which shows gray in contrast with 
black. In Figs. 354, 355, and 356 the gray was printed in one 
impression. We call the special attention of the reader to the 
letter C in each of these figures ; note the apparent difference be- 

55 










tween these letters. Surrounded by blue, the C appears to be a 
yellow- gray; surrounded by red it appears to be a green-gray; 
surrounded by black it is a pure gray, but appears much lighter 
than it is in fact. The apparent change which takes place in a 
color, when it is surrounded by another color, is due to the fact 
that any color occupying a small area of surface will be strongly 
tinted with the complement of the color which surrounds it. 

Plates 69 to 79, inclusive. — These plates represent a series 
of impressions showing a landscape printed in ten colors. Each 
block is shown separate and also as registered into its proper place 
as the work progresses toward completion. The picture represents 
a scene in the Pyrenees Mountains, in Southern France, and was 
reproduced from an old picture printed in the early part of this 
century. Fig. 376, on Plate 79, is the completed picture; the last 
impression was the border, or mat, which was printed in a green - 
gray, and then the whole picture was embossed, or roughed, with an 
electrotype taken from a sheet of emery paper. 

Plate 80. — The borders at top and bottom of this plate were 
printed in rose -lake and three of its light tones — making a fine 
example of the harmony of scale — by gradation of tone; then the . 
back-ground of the page was printed in an olive tint from an 
engraved plate ; then the type form was printed in olive — the whole 
producing a most pleasing and harmonious page. 

Plate 81. — Fig. 378 on this plate shows an impression from an 
electrotype taken from emery paper. Fig. 379 shows an impression 
in a deep blue - black from a plate engraved with bunches of needles 
fastened together. 

Plate 82. — Fig. 380 shows an impression in a deep photo - 
brown from a piece of walnut wood, side grain. Fig. 381 shows an 
impression in the same color, from a piece of ash wood, side grain. 

Plate 83. — Fig. 382 shows an impression from a piece of 
quartered oak wood. Fig. 383 shows an impression from a piece 

56 



! 



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■BffiL' .S^g^M^^^j 



. 






Plate 51 







MANUFACTURERS OF AND DEALERS IN 

BOOK, NEWS and JOB TYPE 

Printing Presses, Cases and Galleys, 

Inks and Printinq Material 
- of Every Description - 



Franklin 



Allison & Smith 

PROPRIETORS 






168 VINE ST 

CINCINNATI, OHIO 



Foundry 




• ELECTROTYPING • 

OF ALL KINDS : 

Books, Music, Patent Medicine Directions, Jobs, 
wood Engravings, etc. 



339 

158, 152, Gold, 5, 81 and 160 

The border around the page was printed with Color No. 160 and embossed at the same time. 



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of shell -bark hickory wood, end grain. Various woods can be 
used to good advantage for tint plates. For instance, the writer 
has many times printed cards, letter -heads, checks, etc., in a deep 
buff tint and one or more colors, for different lumber merchants; 
the buff was printed as a back- ground from a piece of natural ash 
or oak wood. In one case the type form was printed in a deep 
yellow-brown, producing a fine effect — a good specimen of the 
harmony of relative colors. 

Plate 84. — The figures on this plate show four different tint 
patterns printed from stereotype plates taken from different pat- 
terns of book cloth. Figs. 384 and 385 were taken from the right 
and wrong sides of one pattern, and Figs. 386 and 387 from the 
right and wrong sides of another pattern. 

Plate 85. — This plate shows three different combinations of 
hues. Fig. 388 is composed of a light violet -blue and a yellow- 
green; as both colors are nearly related, and are also about equal 
in tone, the combination is weak. Fig. 389 is also composed of 
violet-blue and yellow-green, but the violet-blue is much deeper 
and the yellow-green lighter than in Fig. 388; as a result, it is 
a better combination because of its contrast of tone. Fig. 390 is 
composed of violet -blue and green -yellow — an excellent example 
of the harmony of hues. 

Plate 86. — The figures on this plate were printed with 
inks not shown in any other part of this book. Fig. 391 is 
composed of ultramarine blue and persian orange. Fig. 392 is 
composed of bronze -brown and green lake. Fig. 393 is com- 
posed of bronze -blue, bronze -brown, and green lake — an odd 
combination. Fig. 394 is composed of carmine and green lake. 
Fig. 395 is composed of bronze -blue and persian orange. 

Plate 87. — Fig. 396 on this plate shows the different effects 
produced by printing an open border in gray, black, and gold, on 
red. Fig. 397 shows the different effects produced by printing the 

57 



1 

i 





same colors on green; and Fig. 398 shows the different effects pro- 
duced by printing the same colors on blue. Fig. 399 shows the 
changes which apparently take place in red, when it is surrounded 
by different colors; when surrounded by blue it appears tinged with 
orange ; when surrounded by gray it appears at its true value ; when 
surrounded by black it appears a little lighter than it is, and when 
surrounded by white it appears a little deeper than it is in fact; 
when surrounded by green it appears more brilliant than in either 
of the cases just mentioned. It appears most brilliant when sur- 
rounded by sea-green, its complement. Fig. 400 shows the changes 
which apparently take place in black, when it is surrounded by 
different colors ; when surrounded by blue it appears slightly tinged 
with orange; when surrounded by gray it is seen at its real 
strength ; when surrounded by red it appears slightly tinged with 
sea-green ; when surrounded by white it appears darker than it is 
in fact; when surrounded by green it appears to be tinged with 
red -purple, the complement of green. The eyes must be held about 
twenty inches above the page while testing the explanations just 
given, to obtain the best result. 

Plate 88. — This plate shows a combination of black and deep 
vermilion. By reading the matter on this plate it will be seen 
that no further explanation is necessary. 

Plate 89. — The borders at top and bottom of this plate were 
printed in yellow, green and blue blended into one- another — a good 
example of the harmony of relative colors — by gradation. The type 
form was printed in color No. 34, which is one of the darkest tones 
of red. 

Plate 90. — This plate shows a specimen of map work printed 
in black *and three tints. The tints were made by mixing the 
colors with magnesia, and were printed over the black. Magnesia 
makes a transparent tint which is specially suitable for work 
of this character. The black was printed first; then the blue 

58 




yBHHHHHflHN Ea 

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Plate 57 




^SSSSSSESB^SHBSE5E5ESE5BSESESESBSSSBSBSESESESESESES^5BSESESB5EER 



2SSSE5ESESESESESSSE5E5ESESEHS5EBESESEBBBESESE5ESE5ESEBESESESSHES 



earhart's 
Enbossing Borders 



X MADE IN TWO, THREE AND 
FOUR-EM PICA WIDTHS, AND 
FOUR, EIGHT AND TWELVE-EM 
PICA LENGTHS, AND ON SOLID 
METAL BODY X X X X X 






♦ • JUST THE THINC FOR FANCY PRINTING •♦ 



I,,,! SPECIMENS |m| 
X X Fon lull AND PRICES |lll| * DDRESS 

EARHART 6c RICHARDSON 

CINCINNATI, OHIO 




£HE5H5Hga5H5S5HgHgS5H5HgE5Z5S5g5H5B5B5H5H51B5a5H5H5ra5ESa5aSES5STBS 






340 

II, Gold, 17 1, 7, 36, and borders embossed 






HBHK 






■'-■'■■•■■•.'.■".-■■■■■■.■■; I 1 

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tint ; then the pink tint, producing a purple tint where it laps the 
blue ; then the yellow tint, producing a green tint where it laps the 
blue, and a salmon tint where it laps the pink. These tints were 
made a little stronger than is necessary for map work, for the pur- 
pose of showing how plainly the black can be seen through them. 












59 









Two-Color Combinations. 





HE following list of two-color combinations taken 
from the colors shown on Plates i to 21, inclnsive, 
are in the writer's judgement, either good, very 
good, or excellent. We first give a list of combi- 
nations including red; this is followed by a list 
including yellow; then a list including blue; then a number of 
lists including, orange, green, purple, deep blue, rose -lake, lemon - 
yellow, vermilion, gray, and black, in the order named. Then 
these are followed by lists including colors 17, 34, 36, 41, 44, 45, 
52, 59, 60, 67, 73, 75, 80, 81, 83, 94, no, 115, 118, 119, 123, 135, 
138, 139, 142, 144, and 148, in the order given. The principal 
color in each list of combinations is given at the head of same. 



Red. 



igs. 


I 


and 


2 — good. 


Figs. 


I 


and 


24 — good. 


<< 


I 


a 


3 — very good. 


a 


I 


a 


32 — very good 


a 


I 


a 


5- " " 


a 


I 


u 


33 — 


a 


I 


a 


j << " 


a 


I 


a 


34 _ g ood. 


a 


I 


u 


9 — good. 


u 


I 


a 


37- " 


a 


I 


(i 


11 — very good. 


a 


I 


a 


38- " 


a 


I 


a 


12 — excellent. 


u 


I 


a 


40- « 


a 


I 


a 


21 — good. 


a 


I 


u 


41- " 



60 



m 



' 



HHHter. , .: 



Plate 58 




341 

85 and Copper Bronze 



Samples of nine different patterns of Embossing, from one plate made with punches. 



v$, r A 



h: 



m 



m 

m 









I'' i\J 









t 


















- 








^m& 





'..■>■; 

■ 'r 




•*«kb 



MH^HH 



^^^^ ^ ^^^^^^ r s ^^fc 



. 



• 







Figs, i and 45 — very good. 



u 


I ' 


' 46- 


-good. 


a 


I ' 


( 47- 


a 


u 


I ' 


' 49- 


a 


a 


I ' 


' 50- 


a 


a 


I ' 


' 5 1 - 


-very good 


a 


I ' 


' 52- 


- excellent. 


a 


I ' 


' 53- 


-good. 


il' 


I ' 


' 54- 


a 


a 


I ' 


' 57- 


- excellent. 


u 


I ' 


' 58- 


-very good 


a 


I ' 


' 60- 


u a 


it 


I ' 


' 63- 


a << 


a 


I ' 


' 67- 


a a 


u 


I ' 


< 68- 


-good. 


a 


I ( 


' 70- 


a 


a 


I ' 


' 7i- 


a 


u 


I ' 


' 74- 


- very good. 


<< 


I ' 


' 75- 


a a 


U 


I ' 


' 77- 


-good. 


a 


I ' 


' 79- 


- very good 


a 


I ' 


' 80- 


a a 


u 


I ' 


' 83- 


- excellent. 


a 


I ' 


' 85- 


-good. 


a 


I ' 


' 86- 


a 


u 


I ' 


' 87- 


a 


u 


I ' 


90- 


it 


a 


I ' 


' 9 1 - 


a 


a 


I ' 


' 92- 


a 



Figs. 2 and 1 

2 " 3 
2 " 6 



u 



good, 
very good, 
excellent. 



igs. 


i and 101 — 


- very good 


it 


1 ' 


' 102 — 


it it 


it 


1 ' 


' 103 — 


-good. 


it 


1 ' 


' 104 — 


it 


it 


1 ' 


' 108 — 


- very good 


it 


1 ' 


' 109 — 


-good. 


a 


1 ( 


' no — 


-very good 


it 


1 ' 


' III — 


it a 


it 


1 ' 


' 117- 


- good. 


it 


1 ( 


' 118- 


- very good 


it 


1 ' 


' XI 9- 


- excellent. 


a 


1 ' 


' 128- 


-good. 


it 


1 ' 


' 129 — 


a 


a 


1 ' 


' 132- 


a 


it 


1 ' 


' 142 — 


- very good 


it 


1 ' 


' 144- 


a u 


it 


1 ' 


< 148- 


- excellent. 


u 


1 ' 


' 149- 


- very good 


It 


1 ' 


' 151- 


a a 


it 


1 ' 


' 153- 


a a 


a 


1 ' 


' 155- 


- excellent. 


n 


1 ' 


' 158- 


- very good 


it 


1 ' 


' 160 — 


- good. 


u 


1 ' 


' 161- 


a 


it 


1 ' 


' 164 — 


- very good 


a 


1 ' 


' 170 — 


it a 


<< 


1 ' 


' 171- 


- excellent. 


a 


1 ' 


' 172 — 


-very good 


it 


1 ' 


' 176 — 


a a 



Yellow. 



Figs. 2 and 7 
" 2 " 8 
11 2 " 11 



very good. 

good. 

excellent. 



61 





mm '■-%•' 



ft 


gs. 2 and 12 — -very good. Fi 


gs. 2 and 81 — -very good 




' 2 ' 


« 15- « « 


' 2 ' 


82 — good. 




' 2 ' 


' 1 6 — good. 


' 2 ' 


' 83- " 




' 2 ' 


< 17- " 


' 2 ' 


84 — very good 




' 2 ' 


< 24- " 


' 2 ' 


' 93- " " 




' 2 ' 


' 26— " 


' 2 ' 


' 94- " " 




' 2 ' 


' 27— " ' 


' 2 ' 


95 — g° od - 




' 2 ' 


' 28— " 


' 2 ' 


' 96 — very good 




' 2 ' 


< 31- « 


' 2 ' 


97 _ g0 od. 




' 2 ' 


' 32 — very good. 


1 2 ' 


98 — very good 




' 2 ' 


' 33— g° od - 


' 2 ' 


99 — good. 




' 2 ' 


' 34- " 


' 2 ' 


' 100 — excellent. 




' 2 ' 


' 35 — very good. 


' 2 ' 


' 108 — -very good 




' 2 ' 


' 36- " " 


' 2 ' 


' 109 — -good. 




' 2 ' 


i 37 _ « u 


' 2 ' 


' no— " 




' 2 ' 


' 42 — good. 


' 2 ' 


' in— " 




' 2 ' 


' 43- " 


' 2 ' 


' 112 — very good 




' 2 ' 


' 49 — very good. 


' 2 ' 


1 113- " " 




' 2 ' 


< 50 — good. 


' 2 ' 


' 114 — good. 




' 2 ' 


' 5i- " 


' 2 ' 


' 115- " 




' 2 ' 


1 52 — very good. 


' 2 ' 


' 116 — -very good 




' 2 ' 


' 53— g° od - 


' 2 ' 


' 119— " 




' 2 ' 


' 57— very good. 


' 2 ' 


!25 — good. 




' 2 ' 


' 59 — excellent. 


' 2 ' 


' 126 — -very good 




' 2 ' 


' 60 — • very good. 


' 2 ' 


' 127 — good. 




' 2 ' 


< 61— " " 


' 2 ' 


' 130- " 




' 2 ' 


' 62 — good. 


' 2 ' 


' 131- " 




' 2 ' 


' 63- " 


' 2 ' 


' 132- " 




' 2 ' 


' 64- " 


' 2 ' 


' 135 — -excellent. 




' 2 ' 


' 67 — - excellent. 


' 2 ' 


' 138- " 




' 2 ' 


' 68 — -very good. 


' 2 ' 


' 139 — very good 




' 2 ' 


' 69 — good. 


' 2 ' 


' 143 — excellent. 




' 2 ' 


( 70— " 


' 2 ' 


' 147 — very good 




' 2 ' 


' 77 — very good. 


' 2 ' 


' 148— " 




' 2 ' 


' 79 — g° od - 


' 2 ' 


' 151- " " 




' 2 ' 


' 80 — -very good. 


' 2 ' 


' 154- " " 



62 






"• 



» 



SS'MHSS! 






Figs. 


2 


and 


155- 


- excellent. 


Figs. 


2 


and 


171- 


- excellent. 


a 


2 


a 


158- 


a 


a 


2 


a 


174- 


-very 


good 


a 


2 


a 


160- 


- good. 


a 


2 


a 


175- 


a 


a 


a 


2 


a 


166- 


- excellent. 


a 


2 


a 


176- 


a 


a 



Blue. 



Figs. 


3 


and 


I - 


-very good. 


u 


3 


(< 


2- 


a a 


a 


3 


a 


4- 


- excellent. 


a 


3 


a 


8- 


- good. 


a 


3 


a 


9- 


-very good. 


a 


3 


a 


10- 


- excellent. 


u 


3 


a 


11 - 


-very good. 


a 






a 


12- 


-good. 


a 


3 


a 


13- 


-very good. 


a 


3 


a 


14- 


- good. 


a 


3 


ii 


17- 


a 


a 


3 


a 


18- 


a 


a 


3 


a 


19- 


-very good. 


u 


3 


a 


20- 


a a 


ii 


3 


a 


27- 


- good. 


it 


3 


a 


28- 


- very good. 


ii 


3 


a 


29- 


— good. 


a 


3 


a 


30- 


-very good. 


a 


3 


a 


31- 


— good. 


a 


3 


a 


32- 


a 


a 


3 


a 


34- 


a 


a 


3 


a 


35- 


-very good. 


a 


3 


a 


36- 


a a 


a 


3 


a 


39- 


— excellent. 


a 


3 


a 


41- 


— very good. 


a 


3 


a 


44- 


a a 


a 


3 


a 


48- 


a a 



Figs. 3 and 52 — good. 



a 


3 


a 


55- 


a 


a 


3 


a 


56- 


- very good 


a 


3 


a 


66- 


-good. 


a 


3 


a 


7i- 


a 


a 


3 


a 


72- 


a 


a 


3 


a 


73- 


- very good 


a 


3 


a 


76- 


-good. 


a 


3 


a 


77- 


- very good 


a 


3 


a 


78- 


- excellent. 


a 


3 


a 


79- 


-good. 


a 


3 


a 


80- 


-very good 


a 


3 


a 


81- 


- excellent. 


a 


3 


a 


89- 


- good. 


a 


3 


a 


107 — 


a 


a 


3 


a 


113- 


a 


a 


3 


a 


115- 


a 


a 


3 


a 


116 — 


-very good 


a 


3 


a 


119- 


a a 


a 


3 


a 


120 — 


-good. 


a 


3 


a 


121 — 


a 


a 


3 


a 


122 — 


a 


a 


3 


a 


123- 


a 


a 


3 


a 


124 — 


a 


a 


3 


a 


127 — 


a 


a 


3 


a 


131- 


a 


a 


3 


a 


x 33- 


- very good 



63 



W&m 



'"• . '■•'•'■' ■'- '■ 



3 and 134- 


— very good. 


Figs. 3 


and 


152- 


— excellent. 


3 ' 


' 135- 


it a 


3 


it 


155- 


— very good 


3 ' 


' 136- 


— excellent. 


3 


it 


156- 


a u 


3 * 


' 140- 


— very good. 


" 1 


a 


157- 


- excellent. 


3 ' 


' 145- 


u a 


3 


<< 


159- 


- very good 


1 ' 



' 146- 


— good. 


3 


ti 


162- 


U it 


•2 ' 



' 149- 


— very good. 


3 


it 


163- 


- excellent. 


3 ' 


' 150- 


it a 


3 


a 


l68- 


- good. 


3 ' 


' I5 1 " 


u u 


3 


it 


169- 


— very good 



Orange. 



■ 



Figs. 


4 and 3 - 


- excellent. 


u 


4 ' 


'■ 6- 


- very good 


a 


4 ' 


7- 


u a 


a 


4 ' 


' 11 - 


a a 


a 


4 ' 


' 12- 


u a 


(l 


4 ' 


' 1 5- 


-good. 


a 


4 ' 


' 24- 


u 


a 


4 ' 


' 37- 


-very good 


u 


4 ' 


' 59- 


— good. 


a 


4 ' 


' 60- 


-very good 


a 


4 ' 


' 61- 


— good. 



u 


4 ' 


' 64- 


a 


a 


4 ' 


' 67- 


-very good 


u 


4 ' 


' 68- 


-good. 


a 


4 ' 


■ 70- 


a 


u 


4 ' 


' 77- 


a 


a 


4 ' 


' 79- 


-very good 


u 


4 ' 


' 80- 


- good. 


u 


4 ' 


' 81- 


u 


u 


4 


' 83- 


a 


a 


4 ' 


' 93- 


-very good 


u 


4 ' 


' 97- 


-good. 


a 


4 ' 


' 98- 


c< 



Figs. 4 arid 99 



4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 



ioo- 
108- 
109- 

IIO- 

III ■ 

125- 

126 

127 

130 

132- 

135- 

138- 

139 

143- 
148- 

151- 

152 

155 
160 

171 

174 
176- 



•very good. 

■ good, 
■very good, 
■good. 

very good. 

■ excellent, 
■very good. 

■ good. 



■very good, 
•good, 
•very good. 

good, 
■very good. 

excellent, 
■very good. 

- excellent, 
■good. 

- very good. 



64 



HBai 



■^i.^ 



^>^s«>«w>>- 







" 



PLATE 59 






* 




342 

80 and 163 



Specimen page, showing the use of Embossing Punches. 
The plate was made with four different punches. 







^f-1^ 



>-! 



Green. 



Figs. 



a 



5 and i - 


-very good. 


Figs. 


5 


and 


95- 


— excellent. 


5 ' 


' 6- 


- excellent. 


a 


5 


a 


96- 


— very good. 


5 ' 


' 8- 


-very good. 


a 


5 


a 


97- 


— good. 


5 ' 


' IO- 


a a 


a 


5 


a 


98- 


— very good. 


5 ' 


' ii - 


- good. 


u 


5 


a 


100- 


a a 


5 ' 


' 12- 


a 


u 


5 


a 


112- 


— good. 


5 ' 


' 16- 


-very good. 


a 


5 


a 


113- 


a 


5 ' 


' i7- 


- excellent. 


u 


5 


a 


114- 


a 


5 ' 


' 18- 


-very good. 


a 


5 


a 


"5- 


— very good. 


5 ' 


' x 9- 


-good. 


u 


5 


a 


116- 


— excellent. 


5 ' 


' 26- 


a 


a 


5 


a 


123- 


— very good. 


5 ' 


' 27- 


-very good. 


a 


5 


a 


124- 


— good. 


5 ' 


' 28- 


a u 


<< 


5 


a 


127- 


a 


5 ' 


' 30- 


- good. 


a 


5 


a 


13 1 - 


a 


5 


' 3 1 - 


-very good. 


u 


5 


a 


133- 


a 


5 ' 


' 32- 


-good. 


a. 


5 


a 


138- 


— very good 


5 ' 


' 33- 


n 


a 


5 


a 


140- 


— good. 


5 ' 


' 34- 


-very good. 


a 


5 


a 


141- 


a 


5 ' 


' 35- 


a a 


a 


5 


a 


H3- 


a 


5 ' 


' 36- 


a a 


a 


5 


a 


147- 


— very good 


5 ' 


' 42- 


-good. 


a 


5 


a 


149- 


a a 


5 ' 


' 59- 


— very good. 


a 


5 


a 


153- 


a a 


5 ' 


' 61- 


a a 


a 


5 


a 


iS4- 


— excellent. 


5 ' 


' 62- 


— excellent. 


a 


5 


a 


156- 


— very good 


5 ' 


' 73- 


-very good. 


a 


5 


a 


157- 


a a 


5 ' 


' 76- 


— good. 


a 


5 


a 


163- 


a a 


5 ' 


' 80- 


— very good. 


a 


5 


a 


166- 


a a 


5 


' 81- 


a a 


a 


5 


a 


168- 


— good. 


5 ' 


' 94- 


— excellent. 


a 


5 


a 


174- 


a 



Figs. 6 and 2 
6 4- 



Purple. 

■excellent. Figs. 6 and 5 

very good. 6 " 9 

65 



• excellent, 
very good. 





■**~iM0mt 



Fi 


gs. 6 ai 


id ii — good. Figs. 6 and 92 — good. 




6 ' 


' 14- " . . . ' 


< 6 ' 


' 101— " 




'" 6 ' 


' 21 — very good. ' 


1 6 ' 


' 102 — very good 




6 ' 


' 38 — good. < 


' 6 ' 


' 103 — good. 




' 6 ' 


' 39- " 


' 6 ' 


' 104 — ' 






' 6 ' 


' 40 — very good. ' 


' 6 ' 


' 117— ' 






' 6 ' 


' 41— " " < 


' 6 ' 


< 118— ' 






' 6 ' 


' 45— good. ' 


1 6 ' 


' 119— ' 






< 6 ' 


' 46 — excellent. ' 


' 6 < 


' 128— ' 






' 6 ' 


' 47 — good- ' 


' 6 ' 


' 129 — ' 






' 6 ' 


' 49- " 


' 6 ' 


' 134— ' 






' 6 ' 


' 50 — very good. ' 


1 6 ' 


' 136— ' 






' 6 ' 


' 5i- " " 


' 6 ' 


' 137— ' 






' 6 ' 


< 52- " " 


' 6 ' 


' 142 — very good. 




' 6 ' 


' 54 — good. ' 


' 6 ' 


' 144 — good. 




' 6 ' 


' 58 — very good. ' 


6 ' 


' 150 — very good 




6 ' 


< 7I _ « 


' 6 < 


' 153 — excellent. 




' 6 < 


' 74 — good. 


' 6 ' 


' 154 — very good 




' 6 ' 


' 75 — very good. ' 


' 6 < 


' 159- " " 




' 6 ' 


< 85- " " 


' 6 ' 


' 161— " 




' 6 ' 


' 86 — good. ' 


' 6 ' 


' 162 — good. 




' 6 ' 


' 87— " 


' 6 ' 


' 164— " 




' 6 ' 


' 90- " 


< 6 ' 


' 1 70 — very good 




6 ' 


' 91— " 


' 6 ' 


' 172— " 




Deep Bk 


ie. 




Figs. 7 ai 


Ld 1 — very good. Fi 


gs. 7 and 17 — good. 




7 ' 


< 2— " " ' 


7 ' 


i 18 — very good. 




7 ' 


< 4 _ u 


' 7 ' 


' 19— " •" 




7 ' 


' 8 — good. ' 


' 7 ' 


< 20— " 




7 ' 


' 9- " 


' 7 ' 


' 23— good. 




7 ' 


1 10 — very good. ' 


' 7 ' 


< 27- " 




7 ' 


' 11 — good. ' 


' 7 ' 


' 28 — very good. 




7 ' 


( 13 — very good. ' 


' 7 ' 


' 29— " 




' 7 ' 


( 14 — good. * 


' 7 ' 


' 30- " 


(< 



66 



1 1 ''%%»V» www; 




Ate 






Figs. 7 and 31 — very good. Fi 


gs. 7 and 134 — very good 




7 ' 


32 — good. 


' 7 ' 


' 135- " " . 




7 ' 


' 35- " 


' 7 ' 


' 136 — excellent. 




7 ' 


36 — very good. 


' 7 ' 


' 139 — very good 




7 ' 


' 39- " " 


' 7 ' 


' 140— " 




7 ' 


44 — good. 


' 7 ' 


' 141 — good. 




7 ' 


48 — very good. 


' 7 ' 


' 145 — excellent. 




7 ' 


52— good. 


' 7 ' 


' 146 — good. 




7 ' 


' 55- " 


' 7 ' 


' 149 — very good 




7 ' 


56 — very good. 


1 7 ' 


' 150 — good. 




7 ' 


66 — good. 


' " 7. ' 


' 151 — very good 




7 ' 


< 72- " 


' 7 ' 


' 152— " 




7 ' 


73— very good. 


' 7 ' 


' 155- " " 




' 7 ' 


< 76— " 


' 7 ' 


' 157 — excellent. 




' 7 ' 


78 — good. 


' 7 ■' 


' x 59 — go° d - 




7 ' 


81 — very good. 


' 7 ' 


' 162— " 




' 7 ' 


89 — good. 


' 7 ' 


' 163 — -very good 




7 ' 


' 107— " 


' 7 ' 


' 165 — good. 




7 ' 


< 120— " 


' 7 ' 


' 168— " 




7 ' 


' 124— " 


' 7 ' 


' 169— " 




' 7 ' 


' 133 — very good. 


' 7 ' 


' 176— " 




Rose-lak 


e. 




Figs. 8 ai 


id 2 — good. Fi 


.gs. 8 at 


id 45 — very good. 




' 8 ' 


' 3- " 


' 8 ' 


' 46 — good. 




' 8 ' 


5 — very good. 


' 8 ' 


' 47- " 




' 8 ' 


' 7 — good. 


' 8 < 


' 49- " 




' 8 ' 


9— " 


' 8 ' 


' 5o- " 




' 8 ' 


' 11 — " ' 


' . 8 ' 


' 51 — very good. 




' 8 ' 


' 21 — " ' 


' 8 ' 


' 52— good. 




' 8 ' 


' 24— " 


' 8 ' 


' 54- " 




' 8 ' 


' 38- " 


' 8 ' 


' 58 — very good. 




' 8 ' 


' 40— " 


< 8 ' 


' 63 — good. 




' 8 ' 


' 41— " ' 


' 8 ' 


< 71- " 




67 



igs. 8 


and 


74 — very good. 


Figs. 8 


and 


119 — very good. 


8 






75- " " 


8 




129 — good. 


" 8 






85 — good. 


8 




T A A (< 
144 


" 8 






86— " 


8 




148— " 


" 8 






87- « 


8 




151 — very good 


" 8 






90— " 


8 




153- " " 


" 8 






91 — " 


8 




155- " " 


8 






92— " 


8 




161 — good. 


8 






102 — very good. 


" 8 




164 — very good 


8 






103 — good. 


8 




170— " 


8 






117- « 


8 




171 — excellent. 


" 8 






118 — very good. 


8 




176 — -very good 



Lemon-yellow. 



Figs. 


9 and 1 - 


-good. 






9 ' 
9 ' 


3- 
' 6- 


- very good 






9 ' 
9 ' 


' 7- 
' 8- 


-good. 






9 ' 


' 11 - 


-very good. 






9 ' 


' 12- 


-good. 






9 

9 ' 
9 ' 


' 15- 
' 16- 

' 17- 


- very good 

— good. 






9 ' 
9 

9 ' 
9 ' 


' 24- 
' 26- 
' 27- 
' 28- 


u 
u 

-very good 
- good. 






9 

9 ' 
9 ' 
9 ' 


30- 

' 3 1 " 
' 32- 
' 33- 


a 

-very good 
-good. 






9 


' 34- 


a 






9 ' 


' 35- 


a 



Figs. 


9 and 36- 


— very good 


a 


9 ' 


37- 


a (< 


a 


9 ' 


42- 


— good. 


a 


9 ' 


49- 


— very good. 


a 


9 ' 


50- 


— good. 


a 


9 


5 1 - 


a 


a 


9 ' 


52- 


— very good 


(i 


9 


53- 


— good. 


a 


9 


57- 


— very good 


a 


9 ' 


59- 


— excellent. 


a 


9 ' 


60- 


— very good. 


(< 


9 ' 


61- 


a it 


u 


9' 


62- 


— good. 


a 


9 


63- 


a 


a 


9 ' 


64- 


a 


u 


9 ' 


67- 


— very good. 


a 


9 


68- 


a a 


u 


9 ' 


69- 


— good. 


a 


9 


70- 


a 


11 


9 ' 


7i- 


— very good. 



68 



^■■i^^H^H 






:••'. 



SM»» 



Plate 60 




343 

Color I 15 



i^v-Jv 



344 

Color 165 



] 



Specimens of Embossing in imitation of the right and wrong sides of Leather Paper. 



Figs. 9 and yj 



u 



a 



9 
9 
9 
9 
9 
9 
9 
9 
9 
9 
9 
9 
9 
9 
9 
9 
9 
9 
9 
9 
9 



79- 

8o- 

8i- 

82- 
84- 

93 

94- 

95- 
96. 

97- 
98- 

99 
100- 

108- 

109 

no 

in - 

112 

113- 
114- 

"5- 



■very good, 
■good, 
very good. 

■good, 
■very good. 

a a 

a a 

a a 

a << 

■good, 
■very good, 
-good. 

■ excellent, 
-very good. 
- good. 

■ very good, 
-good. 

• very good, 
-good, 
-very good. 



<< 



a 



u 



Figs. 9 and 116- 

" 9 " «9- 

" 9 " 125- 

" 9 " 126- 

9 " 127- 

9 130- 

9 " 131- 

9 " 132- 

9 " T-35- 

9 " 138- 

9 " 139- 

9 " 143- 

9 " 147- 

9 " 148- 

9 " 151- 

9 " 154- 

9 " 155- 

9 " 158 

9 " 160- 

9 " 166- 

9 " 171- 

9 " 174- 



u 



very good. 

a a 

■ good. 



excellent. 

very good. 
■ excellent, 
very good. 

a u 

u u 

a a 

• excellent. 
- very good. 



<< 



a 



u u 



Vermilion. 



Figs. 10 and 3 



a 
u 

a 
11 

u 
a 
a 
a 
a 



IO 

IO 
IO 
IO 
IO 
IO 
IO 
IO 
IO 
IO 



5 

7- 
11 

12- 

24- 

32 

37 
38- 

45 
49 



excellent, 
very good. 



good. 



■very good, 
good. 

■very good, 
■good. 



Figs. 10 and 50 — good. 



10 

10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 

IO 



51- 




57- 


-very good 


58- 


-good. 


60- 


— very good 


63- 


- good. 


67- 


- very good 


68- 


-good. 


69- 


(< 


70- 


a 


74- 


a 









«g;t 



1 



69 



Figs. 10 and 75 — good. 



10 " 


10 " 


10 " 


10 " 


10 " 


10 " 


10 " 


10 " 


10 " 


10 " 


10 " 


10 " 


10 " 


10 " 


10 " 


10 " 


10 " 



79 
80 

83- 

85- 

87 
90 

91 

92 
101 
102 
108 ■ 

109 

no- 
III ■ 

118- 
119 

128- 



(( 
(( 



■very good, 
good. 



•very good. 

u U 

u u 

good. 

a 

•very good, 
good. 



a u 



k 



Figs. 


10 an 




10 " 




10 " 




10 " 




10 " 




10 " 




10 " 




10 " 




10 " 




10 " 




10 " 




10 " 




10 " 




10 " 




10 " 




10 " 




10 " 




10 " 



— good. 



135 

137 
142 

144- 

148- 

151 

153 

155 

157 

158- 

160 

161 

164 

170 

171 

172 

176 






•very good. 

excellent, 
•very good. 

a. a 

- excellent, 
-very good. 

■ good, 
•very good. 

• good. 

• excellent. 

a 

• very good. 

a u 



Figs. 11 and 1 — ■ 



11 
11 
11 
11 
11 
11 
11 
11 
11 
11 
11 
11 
11 



Gray. 






1 — very good. Fi 


gs. 11 and 28 — good. 


2 — excellent. 


' 11 l 


' 29- " 


3 — - very good. 


1 11 ' 


' 30 — excellent. 


4— " 


' 11 ' 


37 — good. 


5— good. 


' 11 ' 


' 39 — excellent. 


6— " 


' 11 ' 


' 40 — very good 


8— " 


' 11 ' 


1 41— " 


9 — very good. 


' . 11 ' 


< 44 — good. 


10— " 


' 11 ' 


' 46 — very good 


13- " " 


' 11 ' 


' 47- " " 


14— " 


' 11 ' 


' 48— " 


18 — ^good. 


1 11 ' 


' 56- " " 


19 — very good. 


' 11 ' 


' 59 — g° od - 


20— " 


( 11 ' 


' 60— " 



70 






\ N %%mw«w«\«^ 






Figs, ii and 62 



a 


II 


a 


7 I- " 


a 


II 


a 


73- " 


a 


II 


a 


76 — very good 


a 


II 


a 


78 — good. 


ii 


II 


a 


81— " 


a 


II 


a 


83- " 


a 


II 


a 


85- " 


a 


II 


a 


86— " 


a 


II 


a 


95- " 


a 


II 


a 


102 — " 


a 


II 


a 


103- " 


a 


II 


a 


104— " 


a 


II 


a 


133- " 


a 


II 


a 


134- " 


a 


II 


a 


x 35— ver y good 


a 


II 


a 


136 — good. 


a 


II 


a 


137- " 


a 


II 


a 


138- " 



Figs. 11 and 139 — 




ti 


II 


a 


I40 — 


a 


a 


II 


a 


143 — 


n 


a 


II 


a 


145 — 


a 


a 


II 


ti 


147 — 


n 


a 


II 


a 


I48 — 


tt 


a 


II 


a 


149 — 


- very good 


a 


II 


ti 


150- 


- excellent. 


a 


II 


a 


151 — 


- very good 


a 


II 


a 


I52 — 


- excellent. 


a 


II 


a 


153 — 


- very good 


it 


II 


a 


154 — 


a a 


a 


II 


a 


155 — 


a a 


a 


II 


a 


156- 


n a 


a 


II 


tt 


157- 


■ excellent. 


a 


II 


a 


159- 


<< 


a 


II 


a 


162 — 


a 


a 


II 


a 


163 — 


a 


a 


II 


a 


169 — 


•very good 



Black. 



v igs 


. 12 


anc 


I I- 


- excellent. 


n 


12 


n 


2- 


- very good. 


ti 


12 


a 


3- 


-good. 


a 


12 


a 


4- 


- very good. 


a 


12 


a 


5- 


- good. 


a 


12 


a 


9- 


a 


a 


12 


a 


10 — 


- very good. 


a 


12 


a 


x 3- 


-good. 


a 


12 


a 


14- 


tt 


a 


12 


a 


19- 


- very good. 


a 


12 


tt 


20 — 


it a 


a 


12 


a 


29- 


a a 


a 


12 


a 


30- 


- excellent. 



Figs. 12 and 39 

12 " 40- 

12 " 41- 

12 " 46- 

12 " 47- 

12 " 48- 

12 " 56- 

12 " 73- 

12 " 76- 

12 " 81- 

12 " 85- 

12 " 133- 

12 " 135- 



a 
tt 
a 
tt 
a 
a 
a 
a 
a 
a 
a 
a 



-very good, 
good. 



ti 



a 



■ very good, 
■good, 
■very good, 
good. 



very good. 



71 



Figs. 


12 


and 137 — -good. 




Figs. 


12 


and 


15O — good. 


a 


12 


" 138— " 




a 


12 


a 


152- " 


a 


12 


" 139- " 




a 


12 


a 


157— very good 


a 


12 


" 145- " 




a 


12 


a 


J 59 — g° od - 


a 


12 


" 148— " 




a 


12 


a 


162— " 


a 


12 


" 149 — -very goc 


>d. 


a 


12 


a 


163 — very good 



Color No. 17. 






Figs. 


17 


and 


2- 


-good. 


Figs 


• 17 


and 


85- 


- excellent. 


a 


17 


a 


3- 


a 


a 


17 


a 


86 — 


- good. 


a 


17 


a 


5- 


- excellent. 


a 


17 


a 


87- 


a 


a 


17 


a 


9- 


- good. 


a 


17 


a 


90- 


a 


a 


17 


a 


15- 


a 


a 


17 


a 


93 — 


a 


a 


17 


a 


21- 


a 


a 


17 


a 


101 — 


a 


a 


17 


a 


38- 


a 


a 


17 


a 


102 — 


a 


a 


17 


a 


40- 


- excellent. 


a 


17 


a 


103 — 


a 


a 


17 


a 


41- 


-very good. 


a 


17 


a 


104 — 


a 


a 


17 


a 


44- 


- good. 


a 


17 


a 


108 — 


- very good. 


a 


17 


a 


46- 


- excellent. 


a 


17 


a 


117- 


-good. 


a 


17 


a 


47- 


a 


a 


17 


a 


119- 


a 


a 


17 


a 


49- 


-very good. 


a 


1*7 


a 


135- 


- excellent. 


a 


T 7 


a 


5 1 - 


-good. 


a 


17 


a 


137- 


-very good. 


a 


17 


a 


52- 


-very good. 


a 


17 


a 


139- 


-excellent. 


a 


x 7 


a 


55- 


- good. 


a 


17 


a 


142 — 


-very good 


a 


17 


a 


57- 


-very good. 


a 


17 


a 


144- 


- excellent. 


a 


17 


a 


58- 


a a 


a 


17 


a 


148- 


a 


a 


17 


a 


60- 


— good. 


a 


17 


a 


151- 


a 


a 


17 


a 


63- 


a 


a 


17 


a 


152- 


-very good 


a 


17 


a 


67- 


— very good. 


a 


17 


a 


153- 


a a 


a 


17 


a 


68- 


a a 


a 


17 


a 


155- 


- excellent. 


a 


17 


a 


7 1 - 


a a 


a 


17 


a 


157- 


-very good 


a 


17 


a 


75- 


a a 


a 


17 


a 


160 — 


- good. 


a 


17 


a 


81- 


— good. 


a 


17 


a 


161- 


a 


a 


17 


a 


83- 


— very good. 


a 


17 


a 


164 — 


-very good 



72 



■J^S*' Sw-SvSx 1 : 






Plate 6 










:■ 



I 



345 

79, 80, 8 1 and 4 



m 






tes^»sss#i^^$ 



Figs. 17 and 169 — very good. 
" 17 " 170 — excellent. 



Figs. 17 and 171 —excellent. 
" 17 " 176 — very good. 











Color No. 34. 










Figs. 


34 


and 


I - 


— good. 


Figs. 


34 


and 


8 7 - 


a 


a 


34 


a 


2- 


a 


n 


34 


a 


90- 


a 


a 


34 


a 


3- 


a 


a 


34 


a 


102- 


-very good. 


a 


34 


a 


5- 


— very good. 


a 


34 


a 


103- 


-good. 


a 


34 


a 


9- 


— good. 


a 


34 


a 


104 — 


a 


a 


34 


a 


37- 


a 


a 


34 


a 


108- 


a 


it 


34 


tt 


38- 


a 


a 


34 


a 


117- 


a 


a 


34 


a 


39- 


a 


a 


34 


a 


119- 


-very good. 


11 


34 


u 


40- 


— very good. 


a 


34 


a 


125- 


- good. 


a 


34 


a 


41- 


— good. 


a 


34 


a 


135- 


-very good. 


a 


34 


tt 


46- 


— very good. 


a 


34 


a 


137- 


(< n 


u 


34 


a 


47- 


a a 


tt 


34 


a 


139- 


- excellent. 


a 


34 


a 


49- 


— good. 


a 


34 


a 


142- 


- very good 


u 


34 


a 


52- 


a 


a 


34 


a 


144- 


n a 


a 


34 


tt 


57- 


— excellent. 


a 


34 


a 


148- 


- excellent. 


u 


34 


a 


58- 


— very good. 


a 


34 


n 


149- 


-very good. 


a 


34 


a 


63- 


it a 


a 


34 


a 


151- 


n a 


a 


34 


a 


67- 


— good. 


a 


34 


a 


153- 


a a 


K 


34 


tt 


68- 


a 


a 


34 


a 


155- 


— excellent. 


a 


34 


a 


7i- 


— very good. 


a 


34 


tt 


160- 


— good. 


it 


34 


a 


75- 


— good. 


a 


34 


a 


161- 


— very good 


a 


34 


a 


83- 


— excellent. 


a 


34 


a 


170- 


a a 


a 


34 


it 


85- 


a 


tt 


34 


a 


171- 


— excellent. 


a 


34 


a 


86- 


— good. 


a 


34 


a 


176- 


— very good 



Color No. 36. 

Figs. 36 and 2 — very good. Figs. 36 and 5 — very good 



a 



36 



36 



7 — 



73 




. 










Figs. 36 < 


9- 


—very good. 


Figs 


36 and 87- 


— good. 




' 36 ' 


' 21- 


-good. 


tt 


36 ' 


90- 


a 




' 36 ' 


' 32- 


u 


a 


36 ' 


' 102- 


— very good 




' 36 ' 


4 37- 


a 


a 


36 ' 


' 103- 


a tt 




' 36 ' 


' 38- 


a 


a 


36 ' 


' 104- 


— good. 




' 36 ' 


' 39- 


it 


tt 


36 ' 


' 108- 


— very good 




1 36 ' 


' 40- 


- excellent. 


a 


36 ' 


4 TI 7- 


— good. 




' 36 ' 


' 4i- 


— very good. 


a 


36 ' 


' 119- 


— very good 




1 36 ' 


' 45- 


a a 


a 


36 < 


4 135- 


— good. 




1 36 ' 


' 46- 


- excellent. 


a 


36 ' 


' 135- 


— excellent. 




' 36 ' 


4 47- 


- very good. 


a 


36 ' 


' 137- 


— very good 




' 36 ' 


' 49- 


-good. 


a 


36 ' 


4 139- 


a a 




' 36 ' 


4 52- 


- excellent. 


a 


36 ' 


' 142- 


it a 




' 36 ' 


' 57- 


a 


a 


36 ' 


' 144- 


11 it 




' 36 ' 


' 58- 


-very good. 


a 


36 ' 


' 148- 


— excellent. 




' 36 ' 


' 63- 


a ti 


a 


36 ' 


' 149- 


— very good 




' 36 ' 


' 67- 


a a 


a 


36 ' 


' 151- 


it a 




' 36 ' 


' 68- 


a u 


a 


36 ' 


' 153- 


a a 




' 36 ' 


' 7i- 


- very good. 


a 


36 ' 


' 155- 


— excellent. 




' 36 ' 


' 74- 


- good. 


a 


36 ( 


' 160- 


— good. 




' 36 ' 


' 75- 


a 


a 


36 ' 


' 161- 


— very good 




' 36 ' 


' 80- 


-very good. 


a 


36 ' 


' 170- 


it a 




' 36 ' 


' 83- 


a a 


11 


36 ' 


' I7 1 - 


— excellent. 




' 36 ' 


' 85- 


- excellent. 


a 


36 ' 


' 172- 


— very good 




' 36 ' 


' 86- 


- good. 


a 


36 ' 


' 176- 


tt a 






Color ! 


No. 41 


1 






Figs. 41 ar 


Ld 1- 


- good. 


Figs. 


41 ar 


Ld 12 — 


- good. 




4i ' 


3- 


- very good. 


a. 


4 1 ' 


4 15 — 


a 




4i 


' 6- 


tt a 


a 


4i ' 


' 16 — 


a 




4i ' 


7- 


- good. 


a 


4i ' 


' 17 — 


-very good. 




4i ' 


' 10- 


<< 


a 


4i ' 


' 18 — 


■ good. 




' 4 1 ' 


' 11 - 


- very good. 


tt 


4i ' 


( 23 — 


tt 



74 




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Figs 


41 and 24- 


— good. 


a 


4i ' 


27- 


a 


a 


4i ' 


3 1 - 


— very good. 


a 






a a 




4 1 ' 


32- 




tt 


4i ' 


35- 


— good. 


a 


4i ' 


1 36- 


— very good. 


a 


4i ' 


37- 


a a 


a 


4i ' 


42- 


— good. 


a 






a 




4 1 ' 


49- 




a 


4i ' 


' 55- 


a 


it 


4i ' 


57- 


a 


<< 


4i ' 


59- 


— very good. 


a 


4i ' 


4 60- 


— good. 


a 


4i ' 


' 61- 


— very good. 


a 


4i ' 


' 62- 


— good. 


tt 


4i ' 


' 63- 


a 


a 


4i ' 


' 64- 


tt 


a 


4i ' 


' 67- 


— very good. 


a 


4i ' 


' 68- 


— good. 


a 


4i ' 


70- 


a 


a 


4i ' 


' 77- 


tt 


a 


4i ' 


' 80- 


a 


tt 


4i ' 


' 82- 


a 


it 


4i ' 


' 83- 


— very good. 


tt 


4i ' 


' 84- 


— good. 


a 


4i ' 


93- 


— very good. 


a 


4i ' 


94- 


a a 


a 


4i ' 


95- 


— good. 


a 


4i ' 


' 96- 


tt 


a 


4i ' 


' 98- 


a 


a 


4i ' 


99- 


a 


a 


4i ' 


' 100- 


— very good. 


a 


4i ' 


' 107- 


— good. 


tt 


4i ' 


' 108- 


— very good. 


a 


4i ' 


' 110- 


- good. 


a 


4i ' 


' in - 


— very good. 



i%s 


41 


and 


. 112- 


— good. 


it 


41 


u 


113- 


— very good 


a 


41 


u 


115- 


— good. 


a 


41 


It 


Il6- 


— very good 


a 


41 


a 


117- 


— good. 


a 


41 


a 


Il8- 


a 


tt 




a 




tt 




41 




119- 




a 


41 


it 


121- 


— very good 


a 


41 


a 


123- 


— good. 


a 


4 1 


a 


124- 


a 


a 


4i 


a 


i*5.- 


— very good 


a 


41 


a 


126- 


n n 


a 


41 


a 


I3 1 - 


— good. 


a 


4i 


a 


135- 


— excellent. 


a 


4i 


a 


138- 


« 


a 


4i 


ti 


T 39- 


a 


a 


4i 


a 


140- 


— good. 


a 


4i 


a 


142- 


— excellent. 


a 


4i 


a 


143- 


a 


tt 


41 


tt 


147- 


— very good. 


tt 


4i 


a 


148- 


— excellent. 


a 


4i 


a 


149- 


— good. 


a 


4i 


tt 


151- 


— excellent. 


a 


4i 


tt 


154- 


a 


tt 


4i 


n 


155- 


a 


a 


4i 


n 


156- 


— good. 


a 


4i 


a 


157- 


a 


a 


4i 


a 


160- 


it 


a 


4i 


a 


161- 


— very good. 


it 


4i 


a 


166- 


— good. 


a 


41 


a 


167- 


a 


a 


4i 


it 


171- 


— excellent. 


a 


4i 


a 


174- 


— very good. 


it 


4i 


a 


175- 


— good. 


\i 


4i 


tt 


176- 


— very good. 


a 


4i 


a 


177- 


— good. 



75 









I 














Color No. 44. 








Figs. 


44 


and 


3- 


-very good. 


Figs. 


44 and 


82- 


— good. 


a 


44 


it 


5- 


- good. 


a 


44 " 


83- 


- excellent. 


<< 


44 


u 


7- 


u 


u 


44 " 


87- 


-very good. 


it 


44 


a 


ii — 


u 


u 


44 " 


90- 


a ■ 11 


a 


44 


u 


12 — 


a 


u 


44 " 


92- 


— good. 


u 


44 


u 


i5- 


a 


a 


44 " 


93^- 


— very good. 


a 


44 


<< 


16- 


u 


a 


44 " 


99- 


— good. 


<< 


44 


a 


21 — 


-very good. 


a 


44 " 


100- 


it 


u 


44 


a 


24- 


-good. 


a 


44 " 


101 - 


— very good. 


a 


44 


a 


26- 




a 


44 " 


108- 


— excellent. 


u 


44 


a 


27- 


<< 


a 


44 " 


iii - 


— good. 


« 


44 


a 


35- 


u 


u 


44 " 


112- 


c< 


a 


44 


a 


36- 


11 


a 


44 " 


117- 


— very good. 


a 


44 


u 


37- 


- excellent. * 


a 


44 " 


119- 


(< u 


a 


44 


a 


46- 


- good. 


it 


44 " 


125- 


a it 


a 


44 


a 


47- 


<< 


a 


44 " 


126- 


— good. 


a 


44 


a 


49- 


-very good. 


tt 


44 " 


135- 


— excellent. 


a 


44 


u 


5 1 - 


- good. 


a 


44 " 


137- 


— good. 


a 


44 


u 


52- 


a 


tt 


44 " 


138- 


a 


u 


t 


u 


53- 


-very good. 


<< 


44 " 


139- 


— excellent. 


(( 


a 


54 - 


-good. 


a 


44 " 


142- 


a 


a 


44 


a 


57- 


- excellent. 


it 


44 " 


143- 


— very good 


a 


44 


a 


58- 


-very good. 


<< 


44 " 


144- 


(< it 


a 


44 


a 


59- 


-good. 


a 


44 " 


148- 


— excellent. 


u 


44 


a 


60- 


- excellent. 


a 


44 " 


151- 


— very good 


a 


44 


a 


61- 


- good. 


a 


44 " 


153- 


— good. 


a 


44 


a 


63- 


- excellent. 


a 


44 " 


154- 


a 


a 


44 


u 


64- 


-good. 


a 


44 " 


155- 


— excellent. 


a 


44 


a 


67- 


- excellent. 


u 


44 " 


160- 


— good. 


a 


44 


a 


68- 


- good. 


a 


44 " 


161- 


— very good 


u 


44 


a 


70- 


-very good. 


<< 


44 " 


171- 


— excellent. 


a 


44 


u 


74- 


- good. 


(< 


44 " 


174- 


— good. 


a 


44 


a 


75- 


-very good. 


(< 


44 " 


175- 


a 


u 


44 


u 


80- 


- good. 


a 


44 " 


176- 


— very good 



76 



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Plate 62 




IT. 




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pq 


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pq 


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ill 


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13 X! T3 «i 



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346 







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I 



Plate 63 




CO 



PI 








is 




c 




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1) 




ft 




4-> 




Ft 




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T3 




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it 

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DC 
Ft 



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T3 
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cfl 

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1 M 



Plate 64 







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CN, 


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2 


N 


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4 *° 

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/ / 


/// 


N 1 


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o 


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7) 








Q 


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Qi 


00 




H 


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n 







2 


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2 


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1111 


111 


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fa 
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sf-.ii 






Plate 65 



^= colt's armory ^^ 
Printing and Embossing Presses 











THE BEST ON EARTH 



■--V 'V. o. <"* . 



Send for Complete Illustrated Catalogue. 



John Thomson Press Company. 

• • • 212 TEMPLE COURT, NEW YORK • • • 



i 







ill 






349 

67, Gold and 36 



This from one of the Best Printers in Western New York, 

WHO IS USING EIGHTH MEDIUM, QUARTER MEDIUM 
AND HALF MEDIUM COLT'S ARMORY PRESSES . . 



Rochester, N. Y., August i, i 

John Thomson Press Company, 

New York. 

Dear Sirs — I have had running in my office during the past 
year six of your Colt's Armory Presses, and I wish to say to the 
printing fraternity that they are the very best presses I ever 
used, for all kinds of work, heavy and light. I have used the 
old Universal and the "New" Universal, and have thrown them 
all out for yours. 

I like your press because it is speedier, more rigid, never 
slurs, quicker to make ready on, distribution superior to all other 
platen presses, and easier to feed. I found the old Universal to 
be too slow for my work and too easily thrown out of order ; 
and, finally, after giving both the old and "New" Universal a 
fair and unbiased trial, I was forced to abandon them and take 
the Colt's Armory Presses. I wish to say that I have no other 
platen presses in my office, and would have no other. 

Yours truly, 

35 N. St. Pauiv Street, (Signed,) Ernest Hart. 

Rochester, N. Y. 



Send for complete Illustrated Catalogue. 

John Thomson Press Company, 

212 Temple Court, New York. 



hi 



I*.*** • * ' 



:•:•:•:•:' 



• • * • 






• I . - 



v.-. 

»••.•■ 



».♦.•.••••" 



£*•* * * *•*•* *•* ' 



K** * * • ' 



»:•:••••' 



>*♦.•• .•-•.' 



>>:x:i::^il:^E:>:6^::::: 



J) 



rogra/TL 



OVERTURE — VILLAG 



ADDRESS— THE NATU 



ADDRESS — THE OED1P 



/lOusic — "Brno 



ADDRESS — BRIDGE TO 



ADDRESS — A TEW \\' 



flDusic — " Santiago," 



ADDRESS - GOETHE'S 



ADDRESS — THE LlNIVE 



Music — Sclcctio 



• •»»:< 




• •••••• *W*J&+* • •♦»•♦•••»•••••••••»•< 

■ •»•♦«♦•»»•»•♦•»••»•»••*»»••»*•••••• 

• »•••••••*»»»*•••»«••••»•••*••»♦•••< 

•>>b:-:obid5:-^-»vC-s«v:v:v:-:v:v:-:v:-:> 



>♦♦♦♦♦♦ « 



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Combinatioi 



Tints and 



m 



MHKhI 




Plate 67 



10 
TO 



CD 

in 



10 2 
CO - 



o 




It 

Q- 



Combination of Gold, Three Tints and Photo Brown. 




















■■• 



1 

: 



Plate 68 




352 

Red in contrast with the different tones of Black. 




353 

Yellow in contrast with the different tones of Black. 




354 

Gray in contrast with Blue and its light tones. 




355 

Gray in contrast with Red and its light tones. 



I I 



i 






1 






■ i 




356 

Gray in contrast with the different tones of Black. 



.■--.■. 






Color No. 45. 





Figs. 45 and 1 — very good. 


Figs 


45 and 76 — very good 




" 45 


2 — good. 


a 


45 


78 — good. 


■ 


45 


6 — very good. 


a 


. 45 


81 — very good 




" 45 


" 8 — good. 


a 


45 


84 — good. 




" 45 


" 10 — very good. 


(< . 


45 


" 89— " 




" 45 


' 13— good. 


a 


•45 


"■ -93- " 




45 

c c 


" jS— " 


a 


45 


94 — very good 




45 


" 19 — very good. 


a 


45 


95- " " 




" 45 


" 20 — good. 


a 


45 


96 — good. 




" 45 


'' 28— " 


a 


45 


" 100— " 




" 45 


' 29— " 


a 


45 


" 107— " 




" 45 


" 30 — excellent. 


a 


45 


" 112— " 




" 45 


' 31— good. 


a 


45 


" 116— " 


• 


" 45 


' 36- " 


a 


45 


" 120— " 




" 45 


' 40— " 


a 


45 


' 124— " 




" 45 


' 41— " . 


a 


45 


' 133- " 




45 


' 42— " 


a 


45 


' 138 — excellent. 




45 ' 

L L t 


' A A << 

44 — 


a 


45 


140 — very good. 




45 ' 

it / 


' 46— " 


a 


45 ' 


' 141 — good. 




45 ' 


' 47- " 


a 


45 ' 


143— ; very good. 




45 ' 

i i t 


' 48— " 


a 


45 ' 


x 45— good. 




45 ' 

1 1 / 


59 — very good. 


a 


45 ' 


147 — very good. 




45 ' 


' 61 — good. 


a 


45 ' 


' 149— " 




" 45 ' 


' 62— " 


a 


45 ' 


' 154 — excellent. 




" 45 ' 

L L i 


' 66— " 


a 


45 ' 


156 — very good. 




45 ' 


( 72— " 


a 


45 ' 


< I57 _ « « 




" 45 ' 


1 73 — excellent. 


a 


45 ' 


' 166— " « 




* 


Color ] 


^0. 52. 








Figs. 52 ar 


id 1 — good. 


Figs. 


52 ar 


id 3 — good. 




" 52 * 


2 — very good., 


a 


52 ' 


6 — very good. 






*4 



i 



■■■••- 



K 



..'.■.:■■■. 




-\f 









77 



I . 










igs. 


52 


and 


9" 


— very good. 


V 


52 


a 


IO- 


— good. 


a 


52 


a 


II - 


a 


a 


52 


u 


13- 


a 


a 


52 


(( 


l8- 


— very good. 


a 


52 


u 


19- 


— good. 


a 


52 


u 


20- 


• a 


ll 


52 


a 


23- 


11 


tt 


52 


u 


27- 


a 


a 


52 


a 


28- 


a 


a 


52 


u 


29- 


it 


a 


52 


a 


30- 


u 


tt 


52 


a 


3 1 - 


u 


a 


52 


it 


35- 


a 


a 


52 


u 


36- 


— excellent. 


a 


52 


u 


37- 


— very good. 


a 


52 


a 


40- 


— good. 


a 


52 


a 


41- 


(< 


a 


52 


u 


42- 


(< 


a 


52 


u 


44- 


a 


u 


52 


(< 


48- 


— very good 


a 


52 


a 


57- 


a a 


a 


52 


u 


58- 


— good. 


a 


52 


a 


59- 


— very good 


a 


52 


a 


60- 


a a 


a 


52 


a 


61- 


u a 


a 


52 


(( 


63- 


u u 


tt 


52 


a 


64- 


— good. 


a 


52 


a 


65- 


u 


a 


52 


a 


66- 


a 


a 


52 


u 


67- 


— very good 


a 


52 


(< 


68- 


— good. 


u 


52 


u 


73- 


— very good 


a 


52 


a 


76- 


— good. 


<< 


52 


u 


82- 


a 


a 


52 


a 


83- 


— excellent. 



Figs. 


52 


and 


84- 


good. 


a 


52 


a 


85- 


- a 


u 


52 


a 


89- 


a 


u 


52 


a 


93 — 


a 


u 


52 


a 


94 — 


a 


a 


52 


a 


95 — 


a 


a 


52 


a 


96- 


a 


a 


52 


a 


98- 


a 


a 


52 


a 


100 — 


a 


tt 


52 


a 


107 — 


a 


a 


52 


a 


108 — 


a 


it 


52 


a 


112 — 


tt 


a 


52 


a 


115- 


•very good. 


a 


52 


a 


116 — 


a it 


a 


52 


a 


120 — 


-good. 


tt 


52 


a 


121 — 


a 


tt 


52 


a 


123 — 


-very good 


tt 


52 


a 


124 — 


- good. 


a 


52 


a 


125- 


a 


n 


52 


a 


126 — 


a 


a 


52 


a 


135 — 


-very good 


a 


52 


a 


137 — 


a a 


it 


52 


a 


138- 


a a 


a 


52 


a 


139- 


- excellent. 


a 


52 


a 


140 — 


- very good 


a 


52 


a 


142 — 


a a 


a 


52 


11 


143 — 


a a 


a 


52 


a 


144 — 


- good. 


a 


52 


a 


148 — 


- very good 


a 


52 


a 


149 — 


a a 


a 


52 


a 


I5 1 - 


a a 


a 


52 


a 


154- 


n a 


a 


52 


a 


155 — 


- excellent. 


a 


52 


a 


156- 


- good. 


tt 


52 


a 


iS7- 


a 


a 


52 


a 


171- 


a 



78 



m& 



tt-x. 



wm®mmmmmm 







Color : 


No. 


59- 








Figs. 


59 and 2 — excellent. 


Figs. 


59 and 86- 


— good. 


a 


59 ' 


4 — good- 






59 ' 


87- 


a 


u 


59 ' 


S—very good. 






59 ' 


' IOI- 


tt 


a 


59 ' 


9 — excellent. 






59 ' 


' 102- 


— very good 


a 


59 ' 


' 11 — good. 






59 ! 


' 103- 


tt tt 


a 


59 ' 


' 14- " 






59 ' 


' 104- 


— good. 


a 


59 ' 


' 21— " 






59 ' 


' "7- 


a 


a 


59 ' 


' 38- " 


■ 




59 ' 


' 118- 


— excellent. 


it 


59 ' 


' 39- " 






59 ' 


' 119- 


— very good 


u 


59 ' 


' 40 — excellent. 






59 ' 


( 129- 


— good. 


a 


59 ' 


' 41 — very good. 






59 ' 


1 134- 


a 


a 


59 ' 


< 45- " " 






59 ' 


' 136- 


a 


a 


59 ' 


' 46— " 






59 ' 


' 137- 


— very good 


a 


59 ' 


' 47 — excellent. 






59 ' 


' 142- 


— good. 


a 


59 ' 


' 49 — g° od - 






59 ' 


' 144- 


a 


tt 


59 ' 


' 52 — very good. 






59 ' 


1 148- 


a 


a 


59 ' 


' 56 — good. 






59 ' 


' 150- 


— very good 


u 


59 ' 


' 57- " 






59 ' 


' 153- 


a a 


a 


59 ' 


' 58 — very good. 






59 ' 


' 159- 


a tt 


n 


59 ' 


' 71 — good. 






59 ' 


• 162- 


a tt 


a 


59 ' 


' 75- " 






59 ' 


' 166- 


a a 


a 


59 ' 


' 83- " 






59 ' 


' 170- 


a a 


it 


59 ' 


' 85 — very good. 






59 ' 


' 172- 


a tt 






Color No. 6o. 








Figs. 


60 at 


id 1 — very good. 


Figs. 


60 ai 


ld 13 — 


-very good. 


a 


60 ' 


< 2— " " 






60 ' 


' 14- 


(( a 


a 


60 ' 


< 4 _ « 






60 ' 


1 18- 


-good. 


a 


60 ' 


' 8 — good. 






60 ' 


' 19 — 


-very good. 


a 


60 ' 


9 — very good. 






60 ( 


( 20 — 


- excellent. 


a 


60 * 


' 10— " 






60 < 


' 28- 


-good. 


a 


60 ' 


' 11 — good. 






60 ' 


' 29- 


a 






! 












-«'l 






ife 



: \ 



! 



1 



79 






-. ■ 




Figs. 60 and 30 — -very good. Figs. 60 and 123 — very good 




' 60 ' 


31 — good. 


' 60 ' 


' 133 — good. 




' 60 < 


' 36- " 


' 60 ' 


' 134 — very good 




' 60 ' 


39 — excellent. 


' 60 ' 


' 135- " " 




< 60 ' 


41 — good. 


' 60 < 


' 136 — excellent. 




' 60 ' 


44 — excellent. 


< 60 ' 


' 139 — very good 




' 60 ' 


48 — very good. 


1 60 ' 


' 140 — good. 




60 ' 


49 — g° od - 


' 60 ' 


141 




' 60 ' 


' 52- " 


1 60 ' 


' 145- " 




' 60 ' 


' 56- " 


' 60 ' 


' 149 — very good 




' 60 ' 


' 66— " 


1 60 ' 


' 150— " 




60 ' 


< 72- << 


1 60 ' 


' 151- " " 




' 60 < 


73 — very good. 


' 60 { 


' 152- " " 




< 60 ' 


76 — good. 


' 60 ' 


' 155- " " 




60 ' 


' 78— " 


' 60 ' 


' ' 157 — excellent. 




' 60 < 


81 — very good. ' 


' 60 ' 


' 159— ver Y good 




' 60 ' 


89 — good. ' 


' 60 ' 


' 162— " 




60 ' 


' 107— " 


' 60 < 


' 163 — excellent. 




' 60 ' 


' 119 — very good. ' 


' 60 ' 


' 169 — very good 




Color No. 


67. 




Figs. 67 ai 


id 1 — very good. Fi 


gs. 6j and 39 — good. 




' 67 ' 


2 — excellent. 


' 67 < 


41 — very good 




1 67 < 


4 — very good. 


« 67 < 


44 — excellent. 




' 67 < 


' 9— " " ' 


< 67 ' 


48 — good. 




' 67 ' 


< IO _ " 


' 67 ' 


52 — very good. 




' 67 < 


' 13 — good. 


' 67 < 


56 — good. 




' 67 < 


' 14 — excellent. 


' 67 ' 


' 66— " 




' 67 < 


' 18 — good. 


1 67 < 


71- « 




' 67 < 


< 19- " 


' 67 ( 


73 — excellent. 




' 67 ' 


' 20 — very good. 


' 67 ' 


76 — good. 




' 67 < 


' 29 — good. 


' 67 ' 


81 — excellent. 




' 67 < 


' 30- " 


' 67 < 


89 — good. 




' 67 < 


' 36 — very good. 


1 67 < 


' 95- " 



80 



gHHHIHHHHHggHIII 



M 



Figs 


6 7 


and 107- 


— good. 


Figs 


6 7 


anc 


[ 149- 


—very good 


u 


67 


a 


II 9 - 


— very good. 


u 


67 


u 


I50- 


a a 


a 


67 


u 


123- 


a u 


a 


67 


ii 


152- 


a f< 


u 


67 


a 


124- 


— good. 


a 


67 


i( 


157- 


— excellent. 


u 


67 


a 


133" 


a 


a 


67 


a 


159- 


— very good 


a 


67 


a 


136- 


u 


a 


67 


u 


162- 


a a 


a 


67 


a 


140- 


a 


a 


67 


a 


163- 


— excellent. 


u 


67 


a 


145- 


a 


a 


67 


a 


169- 


— very good 










Color No. 73 










Figs. 


73 


anc 


l 2- 


- good. 


Figs. 


73 


and 


67- 


— excellent. 


a 


73 


a 


3- 


-very good. 


a 


73 


a 


68- 


-very good 


a 


73 


n 


5- 


u a 


a 


73 


a 


7i- 


- good. 


a 


73 


a 


7- 


u a 


a 


73 


a 


74- 


a 


a 


73 


a 


9- 


- good. 


a 


73 




75- 


-very good. 


a 


73 


a 


11 — 


u 


a 


73 




82- 


-good. 


a 


73 


a 


21 — 


a 


u 


73 




83- 


- excellent. 


a 


73 


a 


37- 


-very good. 


a 


73 




85- 


a 


u 


73 


u 


38- 


-good. 


u 


73 




86- 


- good. 


a 


73 


a 


40- 


- very good. 


a 


73 




87- 


- very good. 


a 


73 


a 


41- 


- good. 


u 


73 




90- 


- good. 


a 


73 


u 


45- 


- excellent. 


a 


73 




92- 


a 


u 


73 


a 


46- 


-very good. 


a 


73 




93- 


a 


a 


73 


u 


47- 


-good. 


a 


73 




101 - 


a . 


u 


73 


a 


49- 


a 


u 


73 




102 — 


-very good. 


u 


73 


u 


5i- 


u 


a 


73 




103- 


U (( 


u 


73 


a 


52- 


- very good. 


a 


73 




104- 


- good. 


u 


73 


a 


53- 


- good. 


a 


73 




108- 


a 


a 


73 


a 


54- 


a 


a 


73 




iii — 


a 


a 


73 


a 


57- 


- excellent. 


a 


73 




117- 


a 


u 


73 


a 


58- 


- very good. 


u 


73 




118- 


- very good. 


a 


73 


a 


60- 


u a 


a 


73 




119- 


a a 


<< 


73 


a 


63- 


a a 


a. 


73 




125- 


- good. 


a 


73 


a 


64- 


- good. 


a 


73 




129 — 


a 






Figs. 


73 


and 


135 — excellent. 


Figs. 


73 


and 


159- 


— very good 


a 


73 


a 


137 — 


a 


73 


a 


160- 


— good. 


a 


73 


a 


139 — 


a 


73 


a 


l6l- 


— very good 


a 


73 


a 


142 — -.' 


a 


73 


a 


l62 - 


— good. 


a 


73 


a 


144 — 


a 


73 


a 


164- 


— very good 


a 


73 


a 


148— " 


a 


73 


a 


170- 


— excellent. 


a 


73 


a 


151 — very good. 


11 


73 


a 


171- 


a 


a 


73 


a 


153- " " 


a 


73 


a 


172- 


—very good 


a 


73 


(( 


155 — excellent. 


a 


73 


a 


176- 


a a 



I 






I : 






Color No. 75. 







Figs. 


75 < 


and 


I — 


- very good. 


Figs. 


75 « 


and 


84- 


-good. 


a 


75 


a 


6- 


(( a 


a 


75 


a 


89- 


a 


a 


75 


a 


8- 


a a 


a 


75 


a 


94- 


- excellent. 


a 


75 


a 


10- 


-good. 


a 


75 


a 


95- 


-very good. 


11 


75 


u 


13- 


a 


a 


75 


a 


100 — 


-good. 


a 


75 


u 


16- 


-very good. 


a 


75 


a 


107 — 


a 


a 


75 


a 


18- 


- good. 


a 


75 


a 


112 — 


a 


u 


75 


a 


19- 


a 


a 


75 


a 


116- 


-very good. 


u 


75 


a 


27- 


u 


a 


75 


a 


120 — 


- good. 


u 


75 


a 


28- 


u 


a 


75 


a 


124 — 


a 


a 


75 


a 


29- 


U 


a 


75 


a 


133- 


a 


a 


75 


u 


30- 


-very good. 


a 


75 


a 


138- 


- excellent. 


a 


75 


11 


3 1 - 


- good. 


a 


75 


a 


140 — 


-very good. 


u 


75 


u 


36- 


a 


a 


75 


a 


141- 


-good. 


a 


75 


a 


42- 


a 


a 


75 


a 


143- 


-very good. 


u 


75 


u 


59- 


a 


a 


75 


a 


145- 


a a 


(( 


75 


a 


61- 


a 


a 


75 


a 


147- 


- excellent. 


<< 


75 


a 


62- 


— very good. 


a 


75 


a 


149- 


-very good. 


a 


75 


a 


66- 


— good. 


a 


75 


a 


154- 


a a 


a 


75 


a 


72- 


a 


a 


75 


a 


156- 


a a 


a 


75 


a 


73- 


— very good. 


a 


75 


a 


157- 


- excellent. 


it 


75 


u 


76- 


— good. 


a 


75 


a 


163- 


-very good 


u 


75 


u 


81- 


a 


a 


75 


a 


170 — 


a a 



82 



- ; «V,.' 



Color No. 80. 



Figs. 80 
80 
80 
80 
80 
80 

" 80 

" 80 
80 
80 
80 
80 
80 
80 
80 
80 
80 
80 

" 80 
80 
80 
80 
80 

" 80 
80 



and 1 — very good. 



2 

3 

5 

15- 

18 



U (I 



u a 



a a 



good. 






*9 

30 
36 

37 
38 
40 

53 

57 

58 
60 

63 

67 

68 — good 

73- " 

75- " 
76 

78- 

83 

84- 



very good, 
a 

good. 



a u 



excellent, 
good, 
excellent, 
very good. 



very good, 
good. 



a u 



Fi 



gs. 80 
80 
80 
80 
80 
80 
80 
80 
80 
80 
80 
80 
80 
80 
80 
80 
80 
80 
80 
80 
80 
80 
80 
80 
80 



Color No. 81. 



a 



and 93 — good. 

94- " 
100- 

ioi 

102 

108 
116 

133 
135 
137 
138 

139 

142 

143 
144 

147 

148 

149 

151 
152 

155 
160 

161 

171 

176 



very good, 
good. 



— • excellent. 

— very good. 

u (< 

— - excellent. 
(< 

— very good. 

— - good. 

— excellent. 

— very good. 

<< a 

a a 

— excellent. 

— good. 

— very good. 

— excellent. 

— very good. 



igs. 


81 and 


2- 


— very good 


a 


81 " 


3- 


— excellent. 


a 


81 " 


4- 


— good. 


a 


81 " 


5" 


— very good 


a 


81 " 


7- 


u a 



Figs. 81 and 9 
" 81 " 11 
" 81 " 15. 

21 ■ 



•very good. 
• good. 



81 " 



u 



81 



24 










? 
I 



I 





Figs. 


8i and 37- 


- excellent. 


Figs. 


8l 


and 


IOI - 


— good. 


(< 


81 ' 


' 40- 


- good. 


a 


8l 


K 


I08- 


a 


<( 


81 " 41- 


a 


u 


8l 


u 


IIO- 


— very good 


ii 


81 " 46- 


a 


a 


8l 


tl 


III - 


a a 


n 


81 " 53- 


u 


u 


8l 


u 


125- 


— excellent. 


u 


81 " 57- 


- excellent. 


a 


8l 


(I 


126- 


— very good 


a 


81 " 58- 


-very good. 


a 


8l 


u 


135- 


— excellent. 


a 


81 " 59- 


- good. 


u 


8l 


a 


137- 


— very good 


u 


81 " 60- 


- excellent. 


u 


8l 


k 


138- 


— good. 


a 


81 < 


' 63- 


a 


u 


8l 


a 


J 39- 


— excellent. 


(i 


81 ' 


' 64- 


- good. 


a 


8l 


a 


142- 


a 


it 


81 " 67- 


- excellent. 


a 


8l 


a 


144- 


— very good 


a 


81 " 68- 


- good. 


a 


8l 


u 


148- 


— excellent. 


a 


81 ' 


' 70- 


a 


a 


8l 


a 


151- 


— good. 


a 


81 " 83- 


- excellent. 


u 


8l 


a 


*55- 


— very good 


il 


81 " 85- 


- good. 


a 


8l 


a 


160- 


— good. 


a 


81 " 93- 


- very good. 


« / 


8l 


a 


161- 


— very good 


u 


81 " 99- 


a u 


a 


8l 


a 


171- 


a a 








Color 


No. 83 










Figs. 


83 and 1 - 


- excellent. 


Figs. 


83 


anc 


.27- 


-good. 


a 


83 ' 


' 2- 


- good. 


a 


83 


a 


28- 


-very good. 


<< 


83 ' 


' 4- 


a 


a 


83 


u 


29- 


- good. 


a 


83 ' 


' 6- 


a 


u 


83 


il 


30- 


- excellent. 


a 


83 


' 8- 


a 


a 


83 


i( 


3i- 


- good. 


il 


83 


' 9- 


u 


a 


83 


a 


35- 


a 


u 


83 


' 10- 


— very good. 


u 


83 


a 


36- 


-very good. 


a 


83 ' 


' 13- 


— good. 


u 


83 


a 


42- 


- good. 


(( 


83 


' 14- 


a 


a 


83 


a 


44- 


- excellent. 


a 


83 


' 18- 


— very good. 


(( 


83 


u 


48- 


- good. 


a 


83 ' 


' 19- 


— good. 


u 


83 


u 


59- 


a 


u 


83 


u 20- 


a 


a 


83 


a 


61- 


a 


a 


83 


11 23- 


a 


u 


83 


a 


62- 


a 



84 









■■■ 




■■■■■■ 



SERIES OE IMPRESSIONS 



SHOWING A LANDSCAPE 
PRINTED IN TEN COLORS 



/ 



Plate 69 



Each block is shown separate and also as registered into its proper 
place as the work progresses towards completion. 




m 



. 



357 

First impression 




Plate 70 



358 

Second Block 



I I 













359 

First and Second impressions 



Plate 7 





360 

Third Block 





361 

First, Second and Third impressions 






.*W\v:-"' .^*;&-I*\SJ 



Plate 72 



362 

Fourth Block 










363 

First, Second, Third and Fourth impressions 



^^1 — ^M 



Plate 73 






v. ' "1 

I 



364 

Fifth Block 



■ 








365 

First, Second, Third, Fourth and Fifth impressions 



| 



■ 



' 



"3^ 



HnBHJHHHHHi 



Sil 



Plate 74 



III 



*? 







366 

Sixth Block 








367 

First, Second, Third, Fourth, Fifth and Sixth impressions 









i 



I 



III 



ii 



p 



! 



■ 

•V.'-. 

1 

1 






.ttMl 



.^^^^B 



Plate 75 




368 

Seventh Block 








369 

First, Second, Third, Fourth, Fifth, Sixth and Seventh impressions 









Plate 76 










A 



370 

Eighth Block 




371 

First, Second, Third, Fourth, Fifth, Sixth, Seventh and Eighth impressions 






■ 

i 

(■ 

m 



Plate 77 




372 

Ninth Block 




373 

First, Second, Third, Fourth, Fifth, Sixth, Seventh, Eighth and Ninth impressions 



Plate l\ 







* 



374 

Tenth Block 





375 

First, Second, Third, Fourth, Fifth, Sixth, Seventh, Eighth, Ninth and Tenth impressions 









,-r 



MmHaBongiBMnnnnHHaHiaHHHHMiHi 



-* — j J 







M1BHM 



I 



Plate 79 




376 

The border around the picture was printed in a green-gray, and the whole 
embossed with an electrotype taken from emery paper. 






Jill 

II 



I 









I 

1 



II] 



nun 




y.-'. 



^§^> 



lgs. 83 ai 


id 66 — good. Figs. 83 and 119 — very good. 


" 83 < 


71 — very good. ' 


' 83 < 


' 120 — good. 


" 83 < 


72 — good. ' 


' 83 < 


123 — very good. 


" 83 < 


' 73 — excellent. ' 


' 83 < 


' 124— " 


" 83 < 


76 — very good. ' 


' 83 ' 


I 33 — good. 


" 83 < 


' 78— " 


' 83 ' 


< 138- « 


" 83 < 


1 80— " 


' 83 < 


140 — very good. 


" 8 3 < 


81 — excellent. ' 


' 83 < 


141 — good. 


" 83 < 


' 89 — good. ' 


' 83 ' 


' 145- " 


" 83 ' 


94 — very good. ' 


' 83 < 


147 — very good. 


" 83 < 


t g5 _ u u 


' 83 < 


' 149— " " 


" 83 < 


1 100 — good. * 


' 83 < 


' 154- " " 


" 83 < 


' 107— " « 


' ^3 ' 


' 156— " 


" 83 < 


' 112— " ' 


' 83 < 


157 — excellent. 


" 83 ' 


' 115 — excellent. ' 


' 83 < 


163 — very good. 


" 83 < 


' 116— " ' 


1 83 < 


169 — good. 


« 83 < 


' 118 — 


' 83 < 


171 — very good. 




Color No. 


94- 




igs. 94 ar 


id 2 — very good. Fi 


gs. 94 ar 


ld 75 — good. 


94 ' 


' 5 — excellent. ' 


94 ' 


83 — very good. 


94. ' 


9 — very good. ' 


94 ' 


87 — good. 


' 94 ' 


' 11 — good. ' 


94 ' 


' 90— " 


94 ' 


' 21— " ' 


94 ' 


' 92— " 


94 ' 


' 38 — very good. ' 


94 ' 


102 — very good. 


94 ' 


' 40 ■ — excellent. ' 


94 ' 


' 103— " " 


94 ' 


41 — very good. ' 


94 ' 


' 104 — good. 


94 ' 


< 46— " 


94 ' 


' 117— " 


94 ' 


' 47 — good. < 


94 ' 


119 — very good. 


94 ' 


' 49— " 


94 ' 


' 129— " " 


94 ' 


' 52— " ■ ' 


94 ' 


' 137- " " 


94 ' 


58 — very good. ' 


94 ' 


' 142— " " 


94 ' 


' 7 1 — good. ' 


94 ' 


144 — good. 


94 ' 


' 74— " 


94 ' 


148 — very good. 



85 



Figs. 94 and 153 — very good. 
" 94 " 161— " 
" 94 " 164 — good. 



Figs. 94 and 170 — very good. 
" 94 " 171 — excellent. 
" 94 " 172 — very good. 



Color No. no. 



Figs, no and 1 - 


— very good 


no ' 


' 2- 


— good. 


" no ' 


4- 


— very good 


no ' 


' 10- 


a a 


" no ' 


' 13- 


a a 


" no ' 


' 14- 


— good. 


" no ' 


' 17- 


a 


u no ' 


' 18- 


a 


no ' 


' 19- 


— very good 


" no ' 


' 20- 


— good. 


" no ' 


' 28- 


— very good 


no ' 


' 29- 


— good. 


no ' 


' 30- 


— excellent. 


no ' 


' 3i- 


— good. 


no ' 


' 36- 


a 


" no ' 


' 39- 


a 


" no ' 


' 4 1 - 


a 


no ' 


' 44- 


a 


" no ' 


' 43- 


— very good 


no ' 


' 56- 


— good. 


" no ' 


' 62- 


a 


" no ' 


1 66- 


a 


no ' 


' 7i- 


a 



igs. no and 72- 


-good. 


110 ' 


' 73- 


-very good 


no ' 


' 76- 


u u 


" no ' 


' 78- 


-good. 


" no ' 


£ 81- 


-very good 


no ' 


' 89- 


- good. 


" no ' 


95- 


a 


no ' 


' 107- 


a 


no ' 


' 116- 


u 


" no ' 


' 120- 


a 


" no ' 


' 124- 


-very good 


" no ' 


' 133- 


-good. 


" no ' 


' 140- 


a 


" no ' 


' 145- 


a 


" no * 


' 149- 


-very good 


" no ' 


' 152- 


11 a 


" no ' 


' 156- 


u a 


" no ' 


' 157- 


a u 


" no ' 


' 159- 


- good. 


" no ' 


' 163- 


-very good 


no ' 


' 168- 


- good. 


" no ' 


' 169- 


a 


" no ' 


' 173- 


a 






Color No. 115. 



Figs. 115 and 2 — good. 


Figs. 115 and 9 — very good 


" 115 " 5 — very good. 


" 115 " 21 — good. 



86 




Figs. 115 and 37 — good. 



Figs. 115 and 104 — good. 



115 ' 


38- " 


115 ' 


' 108— " 


11 5 ' 


40 — ■ very good. 


«5 ' 


< in— " 


115 ' 


41— good. 


JI 5 ' 


' 119— " 


XI 5 ' 


46 — ■ very good. 


IX 5 ' 


' 135 — excellent. 


IJ 5 ' 


47 — good. 


IT 5 ' 


' 137 — very good 


"5 ' 


52 — very good. 


"5 ' 


' 139 — excellent. 


JI 5 ' 


' 57- " " 


n 5 ' 


' 142 — 


"5 ' 


58 — excellent. 


115 ' 


144 — very good 


JI 5 ' 


63 — good. 


XI 5 ' 


' 148 — excellent. 


IJ 5 ' 


< 67— " 


"5 ' 


151 — very good 


JI 5 ' 


' 68— " < 


11 5 ' 


' 153— " " 


"5 ' 


c ;i _ u 


"5 ' 


' 155 — excellent. 


JI 5 ' 


' 75- " 


"5 ' 


' 160 — good. 


115 ' 


83 — excellent. 


115 ' 


161 — very good 


115 ' 


85 — very good. 


"5 ' 


' 163— " « 


115 ' 


86 — good. 


IX 5 ' 


' 170— " 


115 ' 


' 87— " 


115 ' 


' 171 — excellent. 


115 ' 


' 101— " ' 


115 ' 


' 172 — -very good 


JI 5 ' 


' 102 — very good. 


"5 ' 


' 174 — good. 


n 5 ' 


' 103 — good. 


"5 ' 


' 176 — very good 



Color No. 118. 



118 ai 
118 ' 


id 1- 
2- 


- very good 


118 ' 
118 ' 


3- 

4- 


-good. 


118 ' 
118 ' 
118 ' 


5- 

9- 

' 10- 


- very good 

- good. 

u 


118 ' 


' 1 3~ 


a 


118 < 


' 14- 


a 


118 ' 


' 15- 


a 



Figs. 118 and 19 — good. 



118 ' 


' 20— " 


118 ' 


' 29— " 


118 ' 


' 30 — very good 


118 ' 


' 31— good. 


118 < 


< 36- " 


118 ' 


' 39 — ver y good 


" 118 ' 


' 40 — good. 


118 ' 


' 4i- " 


118 < 


' 47- " 



87 




l -« "~» 



Fis 



gs. 118 and 59 — excellent. Fi 


gs. 118 and 126 — good. 


118 


60 — good. 


118 ' 


1 35— very good 


118 


61 — very good. 


118 ' 


< 138— " 


' 118 


62 — good. 


' 118 ' 


' 139 — excellent. 


118 


« 63- « 


' 118 ' 


' 140 — very good 


' 118 


67 —very good. 


118 ' 


' 142 — good. 


' 118 


68 — good. 


118 ' 


' 143 — excellent. 


118 


73— very good. 


118 ' 


' 147— g° od - 


' 118 


' 76— " 


' 118 ' 


' 148 — very good 


' 118 


83 — excellent. 


< 118 ' 


' I 5 I — good. 


118 


85— good. 


' 118 ' 


' 154— very good 


118 


94— " 


118 ' 


' T 55 — g° od - 


' 118 


' 96- " 


118 ' 


' 156 — very good 


118 


' 100 — " 


' 118 < 


' 157 — excellent. 


118 


' 112 — " ' 


' 118 ' 


' 163 — very good 


' 118 


' 116— " ' 


118 < 


' 166 — good. 


' 118 


' 125— " 


' 118 ' 


< 169— " 



Color No. 119. 



Figs. 119 and 1 — very good. 



119 
119 
119 
119 
119 
119 
119 
119 
119 
119 
119 
119 
119 
119 



3 

5- 
6 

9 
10 

15- 
16 

18- 

19 
20 
27- 

28- 

29 



11 



a 



good. 



u 



very good, 
good. 






very good, 
good. 



igs. 119 ai 


id 30- 


— very good 


119 ' 


( 3 1 " 


— good. 


119 


' 32- 


a 


119 


' 36- 


— very good 


119 < 


' 37- 


a a 


119 ' 


' 57- 


a a 


119 


' 59- 


a a 


119 ' 


' 60- 


a u 


119 


' 61- 


— good. 


119 ' 


' 62- 


a 


119 ( 


' 63- 


u 


119 ' 


' 67- 


— very good 


119 


1 73- 


u u 


119 


' 76- 


— good. 


" 119 ' 


' 83- 


— very good 



;.-;: ,y :v ■-ss : ^\-ss.\\\s ,: \<^^N^ 



The ^ tandard -^^^ 



Publishing Co. 



16-20 E. Ninth St., Cincinnati. 



WZVW 



Book Binding Department. 




Artistic Book Binding in all its branches = = = 
Special Attention Given to Fine Library Binding 
Edition Work of all kinds a Special Feature - = 



•*sV^'fer»5'fe*i 



EMBOSSING - j 
CASE MAKING 
EDGE GILDING 
MARBLING - - 



FOR THE TRADE. 



: Correspondence Solicited 



o 1 



377 

Rose Lake and three of its light tones, 
Olive and its tint. 



Plate 80 





-i 



igs 


. 119 and 84- 


— good. 


u 


119 ' 


93- 


— excellent. 


u 


119 ' 


94- 


— very good 


u 


119 < 


95- 


— good. 


u 


119 < 


99" 


a 


u 


119 ( 


' 100- 


a 


<< 


119 ' 


' 107 - 


a 


a 


119 ' 


' in - 


a 


a 


119 ' 


' 112- 


a 


u 


119 ' 


' 116- 


— very good 


<< 


119 ' 


' 120- 


— good. 


u 


119 ' 


' 124- 


a 


a 


119 ' 


' 125- 


— very good 


a 


119 ' 


' 126- 


u u 


u 


119 ' 


' 133- 


— good. 



Figs. 119 and 135 — very good. 



119 
119 
119 
119 
119 
119 
119 
119 
119 
119 
119 
119 
119 
119 



138 

139 
140- 

142 

143 

147 

148- 
149 

154- 
156 

157 
163 

168 
173 



11 



11 



good, 
very good. 



11 



u 



■ excellent, 
■very good. 

excellent, 
very good. 

■ excellent, 
•very good. 

good. 



I ; 



Color No. 123. 



igs. 123 and 1 — good. 


" 123 ' 


2 — very good 


" 123 ' 


3— good. 


123 ' 


' 4- " 


123 ' 


5 — very good 


" 123 ' 


7 — good. 


" 123 ' 


' 9- " 


" 123 ' 


' 10— " 


" 123 ' 


1 11— " 


" 123 ' 


i I5 _ u 


123 ' 


1 21— " 


" 123 ' 


' 30- " 


" 123 ( 


' 37 — excellent. 


123 ' 


' 38 — good. 


" 123 ' 


' 39- " 


" 123 ' 


< 40- " 


123 ' 


' 41- " 



Figs. 123 and 45 — good. 

very good, 
good. 



u 



u 



123 
123 
123 
123 
123 
123 
123 
123 
123 
123 
123 
123 
123 
123 
123 
123 



46. 

47- 
49 

52- 
53- 
57- 
58- 
60 

63- 
64- 
67. 
68- 

7 1 

74- 
75- 
83- 



u 



•very good, 
good. 
• excellent, 
■very good. 



a 



good. 

■ very good, 
good. 

-very good, 
good. 

■very good. 







1 

■ 

■ 



89 






Pftl 






igs. 123 and 85- 


— very good. 


Figs. 


123 ar 


Ld 137- 


— good. 


123 ' 


93- 


— good. 


<< 


123 ' 


' 139- 


— excellent. 


123 ' 


99- 


a 


a 


123 ' 


' 142- 


— very good 


123 ' 


' 101 - 


a 


tt 


123 ' 


' 144- 


— good. 


123 ' 


' 102- 


— very good. 


a 


123 ' 


' 148- 


— excellent. 


123 ' 


' 103- 


— good. 


a 


123 ' 


' 151- 


— very good 


123 ' 


' 104- 


a 


a 


123 ' 


' 153- 


a a 


123 ' 


' 108- 


a 


it 


123 ' 


' 155- 


— excellent. 


123 ' 


' in - 


a 


a 


123 ' 


' 160- 


— good. 


123 ' 


' 117- 


a 


a 


123 ' 


' 161- 


— very good 


123 ' 


' 119- 


a 


a 


123 ' 


' 170- 


a a 


123 ' 


' 125- 


— very good. 


a 


123 ' 


' 171- 


— excellent. 


123 ' 


' 126- 


— good. 


a 


123 ' 


' 172- 


— very good 


123 ' 


' 135- 


— very good. 


a 


123 ' 


' 176- 


a a 



Color No. 135. 






igs. 135 and 1 — good. 


Figs. 


135 and 30 — -very good 


" 135 ' 


2 — excellent. 


u 


x 35 ' 


' 31— good. 


135 ' 


4 — very good. 


It 


135 ' 


' 35- " 


" 135 ' 


9 — excellent. 


a 


135 ' 


' 36 — excellent. 


135 ' 


' 10 — good. 


a 


135 ' 


' 39- " 


" *35 ' 


' 11 — very good. 


a 


135 ' 


' 41 — very good 


" 135 ' 


< 12— " 


a 


135 ' 


' 42 — good. 


" 135 ' 


' 13 — g° od - 


tt 


135 ' 


' 43- " 


135 ' 


' 14 — very good. 


tt 


135 ' 


' 44 — excellent. 


135 ' 


< r 6— " 


a 


135 ' 


' 48 — very good 


" 135 ' 


' 17 — excellent. 


it 


135 ' 


' 52- " " 


" 135 ' 


' 18 — very good. 


a 


135 ' 


' 55— g° od - 


" T 35 ' 


' I 9 — good. 


a 


135 ' 


' 56 — -very good 


" 135 ' 


' 20— " 


tt 


135 ' 


1 66— " 


" i35 ' 


' 23- " 


a 


135 ' 


' 71— " 


" x 35 ' 


' 27 — very good. 


tt 


135 ' 


' 72 — good. 


" *35 ' 


' 28 — -good. 


a 


135 ' 


' 73 — excellent. 


" i35 ' 


< 29- " 


a 


135 ' 


' 76 — good. 



90 



Figs. 


135 


and 78 • 


— very good. 


Figs. 


135 and 136- 


— very good 


a 


135 


a 


80- 


— excellent. 


u 


135 ' 


' 140- 


- good. 


u 


135 


a 


8l- 


a 


a 


135 ' 


' 145- 




a 


135 


a 


89- 


— very good. 


u 


135 ' 


' 146- 




a 


135 


a 


95- 


— good. 


a 


135 ' 


' 149- 




u 


135 


u 


107- 


(< 


a 


135 ' 


' 153- 




u 


135 


u 


112- 


a 


a 


135 ' 


' 156- 




u 


135 


u 


116- 


— very good. 


u 


135 ' 


' 157- 




a 


135 


a 


120- 


— good. 


a 


135 ' 


' 159- 


-very good 


a 


135 


a 


123- 


— very good. 


a 


135 ' 


' 162- 


- good. 


a 


135 


u 


124- 


— excellent. 


a 


135 ' 


' 163- 


— very good 


a 


135 


a 


133- 


— good. 


u 


x 35 ' 


' 169- 


- good. 










Color ] 


Mo. 138 








Figs. 


138 


anc 


. 2 — 


- excellent. 


Figs. 


138 and 74- 


-good. 


a 


138 


a 


5- 


- very good. 


a 


138 ' 


75- 


- excellent. 


a 


138 


a 


9- 


- excellent. 


a 


138 ' 


' 80- 


- very good 


u 


138 


a 


11 — 


-good. 


a 


138 < 


' 81- 


— good. 


a 


138 


a 


14- 


a 


u 


138 < 


' 83- 


a 


a. 


138 


u 


21 — 


-very good. 


a 


138 ' 


' 85- 


- excellent. 


a 


138 


a 


38- 


- good. 


a 


138 < 


' 86- 


- very good 


a 


138 


a 


39- 


a 


a 


138 ' 


' 87- 


- good. 


IC 


138 


a 


40- 


- excellent. 


u 


138 < 


90- 


a 


a 


138 


a 


41- 


a 


a 


138 ' 


92- 


a 


<< 


138 


u 


45- 


u 


a 


138 < 


' 101 - 


u 


a 


138 


u 


46- 


a 


a 


138 ' 


' 102- 


-very good 


a 


138 


U 


47- 


-very good. 


(< 


138 < 


' 103- 


a a 


a 


138 


a 


49- 


- good. 


a 


138 ' 


' 104- 


a u 


a 


138 


<( 


5i- 


- very good. 


a 


138 < 


' 117- 


-good. 


u 


138 


a 


52- 


a u 


u 


138 < 


' 118- 


- very good. 


a 


138 


a 


54- 


- good. 


<< 


138 ' 


1.19- 


a a 


u 


138 


u 


56- 


a 


u 


138 < 


' 129- 


-good. 


a 


138 


u 


58- 


u 


u 


138 ' 


' 134- 


<< 


a 


138 


a 


7i- 


- very good. 


(I 


138 < 


' 136- 


u 



91 



Figs. 


138 and 137 - 


— very good. 


Figs. 


138 


and 159- 


— good. 


a 


138 " 142- 


a a 


a 


138 


" 162- 


a 


a 


138 " 144- 


a a 


a 


138 


" 164- 


— very good 


<< 


138 " 150- 


— good. 


a 


138 


" 170- 


a a 


li 


138 " 153- 


— very good. 


u 


138 


" 172- 


a u 



Color No. 139. 



Figs. 139 and 1 — good. Fi 


gs. 139 and 55 --good. 




139 ' 


2 — ■ very good. 


*39 ' 


56 — -very good 




139 ' 


' 4— " " < 


139 ' 


1 66— " 




139 ' 


' 9— " " ' 


139 ' 


71 — good. 




139 ' 


' 10 — -good. 


139 ' 


72 — very good 




139 ' 


' 11— " 


139 ' 


73 — excellent. 




139 ' 


< 12— " 


139 ' 


76 — good. 




139 ' 


' 13 — very good. 


139 ' 


' 77- " 




139 ' 


' 14 — excellent. 


139 ' 


y8 — - very good 




139 ' 


< 17- « 


139 ' 


80 — ■ excellent. 




139 ' 


' 18 — very good. 


139 ' 


' 81 — 




139 ' 


< 19— " 


' 139 ' 


' 88 — good. 




i-39 ' 


' 20 — excellent. 


139 ' 


89 — very good 




139 ' 


' 23— good. 


139 ' 


' 106 — good. 




T 39 ' 


' 27 — very good. 


139 ' 


' 107 — very good 




x 39 ' 


' 28— " 


139 ' 


' 120 — good. 




139 ' 


' 29 — good. 


T 39 ' 


' 121— " 




*39 ' 


' 30 — excellent. ' 


139 ' 


' 123 — excellent. 




139 ' 


' 31— good. 


T 39 ' 


' 124 — very good 




139 ' 


' 35- " 


139 ' 


' 133- " " 




x 39 


' 36 — very good. 


139 ' 


' 134 — good. 




*39 ' 


' 39 — excellent. 


T 39 ' 


' 136 — very good 




139 ' 


< 41- " 


' *39 ' 


' 140 — -good. 




139 ' 


' 42 — -good. 


139 ' 


' 141— " 




i-39 ' 


' 43- " 


139 ' 


' 145 — ver Y good 




i39 ' 


' 44 — excellent. 


139 ' 


' 146 — -good. 




139 ' 


' 48 — very good. 


139 ' 


' 149- " 



92 



iiiiitiitB 



■■■■■■■■■■1 



...;■'. : ' : " .■■"-■■.'■'.. .:■■'■■■■■■ . ■ ■• - .•:•.■...•■■■;■■,•,,■.■..•..•■...■■ e 

378 

Printed with color 109, from an electrotype taken from emery paper. 



Plate 81 



,ii 



; 




379 

Printed with color 109, from a wood block. The pattern was made with needles 

fastened together in bunches. 






! .-: ^SSS-.v.v.-S'*;.. 




380 

Printed with color 114, from a piece of walnut wood, side grain. 




381 

Printed with color 114, from a piece of ash wood, side grain. 



Plate 82 






"-- 



Plate 83 




382 

Printed with color 79, from a piece of quartered oak wood. 













IIII 












383 

Printed with color 79, from a piece of shell-bark hickory wood, end grain. 





^N^J^<mS» 



Plate 84 




384 




385 




386 




387 

Printed with color 124, from stereotype plates taken from different patterns of book-cloth. 



1 

I 



I! 

.1 






HI 



■ 



Figs. 139 and 152 — very good. 



u 



J 39 " 157— good. 



x 39 



159 



Figs. 139 and 162 — good. 



J 39 
139 



163 — very good. 
169 — good. 



Color No. 142. 



Fi 


gs. 142 and 1 — very good. Fi 


gs. 142 and 55 --good. 




' 142 ' 


2 — good. 


' 142 ' 


56 — very good 




1 142 ' 


< 4- « 


' 142 ' 


59 — good. 




' 142 ' 


6 — very good. 


' 142 ' 


< 61— " 




' 142 ' 


t g_ « « i 


' 142 ' 


62 — very good 




' 142 ' 


' 10— " " ' 


1 142 ' 


' 66— " 




c 142 ' 


i I3 _ a a 


' 142 ' 


< 7I _ « 




' 142 ' 


' 14 — good. 


' 142 ' 


72 — good. 




' 142 ' 


' 16— " 


1 142 ' 


73 — excellent. 




' 142 ' 


' 17 — very good. 


' 142 ' 


76 — very good 




' 142 ' 


' 18— " " ' 


' 142 ' 


78 — good. 




' 142 ' 


' 19— " " ' 


' 142 ' 


80 — ■ excellent. 




( 142 ' 


' 20— " 


1 142 ' 


' 81 — 




1 142 ' 


' 23— good. 


' 142 ' 


84 — good. 




' 142 ' 


' 26— " ' 


' 142 ' 


' 88— " 




' 142 ' 


' 27 — very good. 


' 142 ' 


89 — very good 




' 142 ' 


' 28 — good. 


1 142 ' 


' 94- " " 




' 142 ' 


' 29 — very good. 


' 142 ' 


95- " " 




' 142 ' 


' 30 — excellent. 


' 142 ' 


' 100 ■ — -good. 




1 142 ' 


' 31— good. 


' 142 ' 


' 107 — excellent. 




' 142 ' 


' 32 — good. 


' 142 ' 


' 112- — good. 




' 142 ' 


1 35- " 


{ 142 ' 


' 115- — -excellent. 




1 142 ' 


' 36 — very good. 


' 142 ' 


' 116 — very good 




1 142 ' 


' 39 — good- 


' 142 ' 


' 120 — good. 




' 142 ' 


' 42- " 


' 142 ' 


' 123 — very good 




' 142 ' 


' 43- " 


' 142 ' 


' 124 — excellent. 




' 142 ' 


' 44 — excellent. 


' 142 ' 


' 133— good. 




' 142 ' 


' 48 — good. 


' 142 ' 


« 136- " 




' 142 ' 


1 52 — very good. 


1 142 ' 


' 138 — very good 









93 







142 


and 140- 


— very good 


142 


" 141- 


— good. 


142 


" 145- 


-very good 


142 


" 146- 


— good. 


142 


" 147- 


- very good 


142 


" 149- 


— good. 



Figs. 142 and 154 — good. 



142 ' 


' 156- 


u 


142 ' 


' 1 57~ 


u 


142 ' 


' 163- 


- very good 


142 ' 


' 166- 


- good. 


142 ' 


' 168- 


u 



Color No. 144. 



Fie 



gs. 144 and 1— very good. Fi 


.gs. 144 and 61 — -good. 


144 ' 


6 — good. 


' 144 ' 


62 — ■ very good 


144 ' 


' 8— " 


144 ' 


' 66— " 


144 ' 


' 10 — very good. 


' 144 ' 


72 — good. 


144 ( 


' 13- " " 


' 144 ' 


73 — -excellent. 


144 ' 


' 14 — good. 


144 ' 


76 — -good. 


144 ' 


' 16— " 


144 ' 


78 — very good 


144 ' 


' 17 — excellent. 


1 144 ' 


< 80— " 


144 ' 


' 18 — good. 


' 144 ' 


< 81— " 


144 ' 


' 19 — -very good. 


' 144 ' 


84 — good. 


144 ' 


' 20— " 


' 144 ' 


89 — very good 


144 ' 


' 2 7 — good. 


144 ( 


94 — good. 


144 ' 


< 28— " 


' 144 ' 


95— very good 


144 ' 


' 29 — -very good. 


' 144 ' 


96 — good. 


144 ' 


' 30 — • excellent. 


144 ' 


' 98— " 


144 ' 


' 3 1 — good. 


' 144 ' 


' 100— " 


144 ' 


' 32- " 


144 ' 


' 107 — very good 


: 144 ' 


' 35— g° od - 


' 144 ' 


' 112 — good. 


144 ' 


' 36 — very good. 


' 144 ' 


' 113- " 


144 ' 


' 39 — g° od - 


' 144 ' 


' 115 — -very good 


144 ' 


' 42 — very good. 


' 144 ' 


' 116— " 


144 ' 


' 43 — good- 


' 144 ' 


' 120— " 


144 ' 


' 44 — very good. 


< 144 ' 


' 121 — good. 


• 144 < 


' 48— " 


' 144 ' 


' 124 — very good 


144 ' 


' 56 — good. 


' 144 ' 


' 133- " " 


144 ' 


' 59 — very good. 


144 ' 


' 138— " 



94 



Figs. 


I 44 


and 140 


— excellent. 


Figs. 


144 


and 


*54- 


— very good 


a 


144 


11 


I 4 I 


— good. 


a 


144 


a 


156- 


(( a 


a 


I44 


a 


145 


— very good. 


a 


144 


a 


157- 


a a 


a 


144 


a 


146 


— good. 


a 


144 


a 


163- 


— good. 


a 


144 


a 


147 


— excellent. 


a 


I44 


a 


168- 


a 


a 


I44 


a 


149- 


— very good. 


it 


144 


a 


173- 


a 










Color No. 148 










Figs. 


I48 


and 1 — 


- excellent. 


Figs. 


148 


and 


39- 


— excellent. 


a 


I48 


a 


2 — 


-very good. 


a 


148 


a 


41- 


a 


a 


I48 


a 


4- 


a a 


a 


148 


a 


42- 


— good. 


a 


I48 


a 


8- 


-good. 


tt 


148 


a 


43- 


— very good 


a 


I48 


it 


9- 


-very good. 


a 


148 


a 


44- 


— excellent. 


a 


I48 


a 


10 — 


- excellent. 


a 


148 


a 


48- 


a 


a 


I48 


a 


11 — 


- good. 


tt 


148 


a 


5i- 


— good. 


a 


I48 


a 


12 — 


a 


a 


148 


a 


52- 


-very good. 


u 


I48 


tt 


13- 


- excellent. 


a 


148 


a 


55- 


n a 


a 


I48 


a 


14- 


-very good. 


a 


148 


a 


56- 


a a 


tt 


148 


a 


16- 


-good. 


ti 


148 


a 


62- 


- good. 


a 


I48 


tt 


17- 


- excellent. 


a 


148 


a 


66- 


- excellent. 


a 


I48 


tt 


18- 


-very good. 


a 


148 


a 


7i- 


- good. 


u 


I48 


tt 


19- 


- excellent. 


tt 


148 


a 


72- 


- very good. 


a 


148 


a 


20 — 


a 


a 


148 


tt 


73- 


- excellent. 


u 


I48 


a 


23- 


- very good. 


a 


148 


a 


76- 


-very good. 


c< 


I48 


a 


26- 


- good. 


a 


148 


a 


78- 


ti a 


a 


I48 


a 


27- 


-very good. 


a 


148 


a 


80- 


- excellent. 


a 


I48 


tt 


28- 


a tt 


tt 


148 


a 


81- 


it 


u 


148 


a 


29- 


it a 


a 


148 


a 


84- 


- good. 


a 


I48 


a 


30- 


- excellent. 


a 


148 


tt 


88- 


a 


a 


I48 


a 


3 1 - 


-very good. 


a 


148 


a 


89- 


-very good. 


a 


148 


tt 


32- 


-good. 


a 


148 


a 


95- 


- good. 


a 


I48 


a 


34- 


- excellent. 


a 


148 


a 


106 — 


a 


a 


I48 


a 


35- 


-very good. 


a 


148 


a 


107 — 


- very good. 


a 


I48 


a 


36- 


- excellent. 


a 


148 


a 


112- 


- good. 




95 





igs. 148 and 113 --good. Figs. 148 ar 


Ld 145 — very good 


148 ' 


' 115 — -excellent. 


' 148 ' 


' 146 — good. 


" 148 ' 


' 116 — very good. 


' 148 ' 


147 — 


" 148 ' 


' 119— " 


148 ' 


' 149 — very good 


148 ' 


' 120— " 


' 148 ' 


' 152 — good. 


148 ' 


' 121 — very good. 


' 148 ' 


< 156- " 


148 ' 


' 123 — excellent. 


' 148 ' 


' 157— ver y g° 0(i 


" 148 ' 


' 124 — 


' 148 ' 


' 159 — g° od - 


" 148 ' 


' 127 — good. 


' 148 ' 


' 163 — -very good 


148 ' 


' 133— ver y g° od - 


' 148 ' 


' 165 — good. 


" 148 ' 


' 134 — g° od - 


' 148 ' 


' 168— " 


" 148 ' 


' 136 — very good. 


148 ' 


( 169— " 


148 ' 


< 140— " 


' 148 ' 


173 — 


148 ' 


' 141 — good. 


' 148 ' 


' 178 — very good 




96 






Plate 85 




388 

Light Violet-Blue and Yellow-Green 




389 

Deep Violet-Blue and Light Yellow-Green 




390 

Violet-Blue and Green-Yellow 



Two-Color Combinations 



»--■-:■ 



i| 






ill 



Mi! 



! 



xxxxxxxtxxxx xxxjxxxxxxj 

J^|kF| lk JF|kF|lk^i kl 

I X X X I X X X X XX XX ZX X I IX XX Z 1 1 

Morgan 



IXXX XXXXXXXXXXTX 




391 

Ultramarine Blue and Persian Orange 



Plate 86 



IXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXTXXTTXXX 




all! jM ^™ 

xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx 

Grayson 




xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx 

392 

Bronze Brown and Green Lake 



Ip^iLWIlLPm 

y'igyjiyjiyjiysMiysyjiyiyjiyiysy'jiysMi 



WMMM!M^tmm 







m 






^^!!^ff^!I^W 



yjjyjiyjjyjiyjiy^yjiyjiyjiyjiyjiy^yjjyjiy] 









393 

Bronze Blue, Bronze Brown, and Green Lake 



xxxz; 



rTTTTTTTXXXTX! 



JIWJ^jH' 



yjiyHi 



rxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxrxxxx: 

Knofler 




Carmine and Green Lake 




Jones 



ZXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXTXXXXTX 




^^^■■■M 



Plate 87 













Wki 





Gray on Red 



396 

Black on Red 



Gold on Red 




Gray on Green 



397 

Black on Green 



Gold on Green 




Gray on Blue 



398 

Black on Blue 



Gold on Blue 








399 

Red surrounded by Blue, Gray, Black, White, and Green 




400 

Black Surrounded by Blue, Gray, Red, White, and Green 



■ 




Three-Color Combinations. 




|B will now give a number of lists of three-color 
combinations taken from the colors shown on 
Plates i to 21, inclusive, which we consider 
good, very good, or excellent. The first is a list 
of combinations including red and yellow ; this 
is followed by a list including red and blue ; then a number of lists 
including red and green, red and deep blue, red and lemon-yellow, 
red and gray, and red and black in the order named. Then 
these are followed by lists including red and colors 34, 41, 45, 52, 
67, 75, 83, no, 135, 139 and 148 in the order given, altogether 
making a collection of several hundred combinations, in which red 
is the principal color. In forming these combinations we were 
governed solely by the natural laws of harmony and contrast of 
colors. 



Red and Yellow. 



Figs. 1 



a 
a 
a 



2, and 3 

2, " 7 

2, " II 
2, " 12 
2, " 26 



• very good. 

<< (< 

u a 

a (< 

good. 



Figs. 1, 2, and 32 — very good. 



a 
u 
a 
u 



2, 
2, 
2, 

2, 



u 



34 



37- 


- good. 




49- 
52- 


-very 


good 



97 









Figs, i j 


2, 


and 57 — excellent. 


Figs. 1 


, 2, and 117 — very good 


" i, 


2, 


6o — very good. 


" 1 


2, ' 


' 118 — excellent. 


" *, 


2, 


63 — good. 


" 1 


2, ' 


' 119 — very good 


" h 


2, 


67 — excellent. 


" 1 


2, ' 


' 135- " " 


" I; 


2, 


68 — very good. 


" 1 


2, ' 


' 139- " " 


" I, 


2, 


<< >-, 7 a u 


" 1 


2, ' 


' 148 — excellent. 


" h 


2, 


« 80 — good. 


" 1 


2, ' 


' 15 !— good. 


" I, 


2, 


" 81— " 


" 1 


2, ' 


' 155 — very good 


" I, 


2, 


83 — very good. 


" 1 


2, ' 


' 158— " 


" T > 


2, 


" 108 — excellent. 


" 1 


2, ' 


< 171— " 



Red and Blue. 



igs. 1, 


3, 


anc 


I 9- 


— very good. 


Figs 


I 


, 3, and 79- 


— very good 


*, 


3, 


u 


11 - 


— good. 


a 


I 


3, ' 


' 80- 


— good. 


h 


3, 


u 


32- 


— very good. 


it 


I 


3, ' 


' 81- 


a 


h 


3, 


u 


34- 


u a 


it 


I 


3, ' 


' 108- 


it 


h 


3, 


a 


41- 


a a 


it 


I, 


3, ' 


' 139- 


— very good 


h 


3, 


ii 


47- 


— good. 


it 


I 


3» ' 


' 155- 


— good. 


h 


3, 


a 


52- 


— very good. 


a 


I 


3, ' 


' 159- 


— very good. 


h 


3, 


a 


68- 


— good. 


a 


I 


3, ' 


' 162- 


— good. 


h 


3, 


u 


7 1 - 


— very good. 


it 


I 


3, ' 


' 169- 


— very good 



Red and Green. 



Figs. 1, 5, and 11 — very good. 



h 


5, 


a 


12— " 


h 


5> 


it 


. 26 — - good. 


h 


5> 


u 


32 — very good 


h 


5, 


u 


33- " " 


I, 


5, 


u 


34- " " 


h 


5, 


a 


40— " 



Figs. 1, 5, and 90 — very good. 



a 


h 


5> ' 


92- 


it it 


it 


h 


5, ' 


' 103- 


- good. 


it 


h 


5, ' 


' 104- 


-very good 


a 


h 


5, ' 


' «3- 


- good. 


it 


I, 


5, ' 


' 117- 


a 


it 


h 


5, ' 


' 118- 


— very good 



98 



Figs, i, 5, and 129 



a 
a 

a 



5> 
5, 



i33 — 

1 37 — 
149 — 



good. 


Figs. 


very good. 


a 


good. 


a 


a 


<< 



Figs, i, 5, and 153 

158- 

163- 

172 



-very good. 
a 

good. 



a a 



1, 5, 



a 



Red and Deep Blue. 



igs. 


h 


7, 


mc 


■ 9- 


- good. 


Figs. 


I, 


7, 


and 52 


a 


I, 


7, 


a 


11 - 


a 


a 


I, 


7, 


" 7i 


a 


I, 


7, 


a 


3 1 - 


a 


a 


I, 


7, 


" 81 


a 


I, 


7, 


a 


32- 


— very good. 


a 


I, 


7, 


" 139 


a 


I> 


7, 


a 


39- 


- good. 


a 


I, 


7, 


" 150 


a 


h 


7, 


(< 


41- 


a 


a 


I, 


7, 


" 155 


a 


I, 


7, 


a 


47- 


-very good. 


a 


I, 


7, 


" 162 



good. 



very good. 



good. 



Red and Lemon Yellow. 



Figs. 


I, 


9, 


and 


II - 


— very good 


a 


I, 


9, 


a 


12- 


— good. 


(i 


I 


9, 


a 


24- 


a 


ft 


I 


9, 


a 


26- 


a 


a 


I, 


9, 


a 


32- 


— very good 


a 


I, 


9, 


»(( 


34- 


a a 


a 


I, 


9, 


(( 


37- 


— good. 


a 


I, 


9, 


a 


57- 


— very good 


a 


I, 


9, 


a 


60- 


a a 


a 


I, 


9, 


a 


63- 


a <( 


a 


I, 


9, 


a 


67- 


— excellent. 


a 


I, 


9) 


a 


68- 


— very good 


a 


I 


9, 


a 


83- 


— good. 


a 


I 


9, 


a 


108- 


' a 



Figs. 


I, 


a 


I, 


a 


I, 


a 


I, 


a 


I, 


a 


I, 


a 


I, 


a 


I, 


a 


I, 


a 


I, 


a 


I, 


a 


I, 


a 


I, 


a 


I, 



9, 


and 


no — 


-very goo< 


9, 


a 


III — 


a a 


9, 


a 


117 — 


a a 


9, 


a 


Il8 — 


■ excellent 


9, 


a 


119 — 


a 


9, 


a 


135 — 


a 


9, 


a 


x 39 — 


a 


9, 


a 


142 — 


- good. 


9, 


a 


144 — 


a 


9, 


(< 


148 — 


a 


9> 


a 


I5 1 — 


a 


9, 


a 


155 — 


a 


9, 


a 


171- 


a 


9, 


u 


176 — 


a 



99 






. ..~nrtri?g» J ^ 



Red and Gray. 



Figs, i 



ii 
ii 
ii 
ii 
ii 
ii 
ii 
ii 
ii 
ii 
ii 
ii 
ii 
ii 
ii 
ii 



12- 


- very good. F: 


gs. I 


, II 


, and 83- 


— excellent. 


24- 


- good. 


I 


1 IX 


, " 85- 


— very good 


26- 


u I 


I 


II 


" 101 - 


a a 


33- 


ti i 


' I 


II 


" 135- 


— excellent. 


34- 


- very good. 


' I 


II 


" T 39- 


n 


40- 


- excellent. ' 


I 


II 


" I 42- 


— very good 


41- 


- very good. 


' I 


II 


" 148- 


— excellent. 


46- 


<( a i 


' I 


II 


" T 49- 


— very good 


47- 


u u i 


I, 


II 


" 150- 


a a 


52- 


- good. 


I, 


II, 


" 151- 


a u 


58- 


-very good. 


' I, 


II, 


" 153- 


a << 


60- 


a a < 


I 


II 


" 1 55~ 


— excellent. 


7i- 


- good. 


' l j 


II 


11 161- 


— good. 


74- 


u 1 


1 I 


II 


" 162- 


— very good 


79- 


-very good. 


I 


II 


" 171- 


a a 


80- 


ecu < 


1 I 


II 


" 172- 


a u 












Figs. 1 

1 



12, and 40 

12, " 41- 

12, " 46- 

12, " 47- 

12, " 52- 

12, " 57- 

12, " 58- 

12, " 60 

12, <( 63- 

12, " 67- 

12, " 71- 

12, " 83- 

12, " 85- 

12, " 86- 

12, " 102 • 



Red and Black. 

very good, 
good. 

very good, 
good. 

excellent, 
very good. 
■ good. 
very good, 
good. 
very good, 
excellent. 

very good, 
good. 



Figs 


I 


, . 12, an 


u 


I 


12, " 


(( 


I 


12, " 


a 


I 


12, " 


u 


I 


12, " 


a 


I 


12, " 


a 


I 


12, " 


a 


I 


12, " 


a 


I 


12, " 


a 


I, 


12, " 


a 


I, 


12, " 


u 


I 


12, " 


a 


I 


12, " 


u 


I, 


12, " 


u 


I 


12, " 



IOO 



104 

133 

135 

137- 

139 

142 
144- 
148- 
149- 

150- 

153 
155 
162- 
171 



-very good. 

good. 

■ excellent. 

■ very good, 
excellent, 
very good, 
good, 
excellent. 

■ very good, 
good. 

■very good, 
good. 
• very good. 












Plate 88 



Do NOT FORGET THAT. 



This Red 



FORMS A BETTER 

COMBINATION 

WITH 



* Black * 



UlliilU 




» 




THAN ROSE LAKE OR^ 
ANY OTHER RED WHICH 
LEANS TOWARD PURPLE 



• Printers • 

often make the mistake of combining a purplish 

red with black. 



i 






nil 



401 

12 and 30 







Red and Color 


No. 


34- 




igs. i 


, 34, and 32 — very good. Fi 


gs- 1, 


34, and 90 — good. 


" I , 


34, ' 


' 38 — good. 


1, 


34, ' 


' 102 — very good 


" i 


34, ' 


' 40 — excellent. ' 


1, 


34, ' 


< 103- " « 


" i 


34, ' 


' 41 — very good. ' 


1, 


34, ' 


' 104— " 


" i 


34, ' 


' 45- " " 


1, 


34, ' 


' 108— " 


" i j 


34, ' 


' 46 — excellent. ' 


1, 


34, ' 


' no — good. 


i 


34, ' 


' 47 — very good. 


1, 


34, ! 


' in — very good 


i 


34, ' 


< 49 — good. 


1, 


34, ' 


' 117 — good. 


" i 


34, ' 


' 52 — very good. 


1, 


34, ' 


' 119— -very good 


i, 


34, ' 


' 57 — excellent. 


1, 


34, ' 


' 129— " 


" i 


34, ' 


' 58 — very good. ' 


1, 


34, ' 


' 133- " " 


" i 


. 34, ' 


' 60— " " ' 


h 


34, ' 


' 135 — excellent. 


i 


34, ' 


< 63- " " 


1, 


34, ' 


' 137 — very good 


i 


34, ' 


' 67— " 


1, 


34, ' 


' 139 — excellent. 


" i 


34, ' 


' 68 — good. 


h 


34, ' 


' 142 — 


" i 


, 34, ' 


< 71- " 


1, 


34, ' 


' 144 — very good 


i 


, 34, ' 


' 74- " 


1, 


34, ' 


' 148 — excellent. 


U T ! 


34, ' 


' 75 — very good. 


1, 


34, ' 


' 151 — very good 


" I 


34, ' 


' 81 — good. 


h 


34, ' 


' 155^ — excellent. 


" I 


34, ' 


' 83 — excellent. ' 


1, 


34, ' 


' 161 — very good 


" I 


34, ' 


' 85- " 


1, 


34, ' 


< l7 o_ " 


I 


34, ' 


' 86 — very good. 


1, 


34, ' 


' 171 — excellent. 


" I 


34, ' 


' 87 — good. 


1, 


34, ' 


' 176 — very good 



Red and Color No. 41. 



igs. 1, 


41, and 


32 — very good. 


Figs. 1 


41, and 


67 — excellent. 


h 


4i, " 


34- " " 


" 1 


4i, " 


68 — very good 


1, 


4i, " 


37- " " 


" 1 


4i, " 


77 — good. 


1, 


4i, " 


49- " " 


" 1 


4i, " 


80— " 


h 


4 1 , " 


57 — excellent. 


" 1 


4i, " 


83 — excellent. 


h 


4i, " 


60 — very good. 


il 1 


4i, " 


108 — very good 


" h 


4i, " 


63- " " 


" 1 


4i, " 


no— " 



IOI 









Figs. 



a 

a 

u 

a 

a 
u 
a 



41, and in 
117. 
118 



4h 
4i, 

41, 
41, 
4i, 
4i, 
41, 



excellent, 
very good. 



119 

135- 
126 

i35- 
139- 



a 



excellent, 
very good, 
excellent. 



Figs. 1, 41, and 142 — very good. 

- good. 

■ excellent, 
good. 

■ very good. 



a 
a 
a 
a 
a 
a 
it 



41, 
41, 
41, 

4ij 

4 1 , 
4i) 
4i, 



a 
a 
a 
it 
a 
a 
tt 



144 
148- 

I 5 I " 

x 55 

158 

171- 

176 



a 



■ excellent, 
•good. 



Red and Color No. 45. 



igs. 


h 


45, and 26 — good. 


Figs 


I, 


45, 


and 


8 5— good. 


a 


I, 


45, ' 


32 — very good. 


ii 


I, 


45, 


a 


103- " 


a 


I, 


45, ' 


' 33- " " 


a 


h 


45, 


a 


I 33 — very good 


a 


h 


45, ' 


' 34- " " 


a 


I, 


45, 


a 


137- " " 


tt 


h 


45, ' 


' 35- " " 


a 


h 


45, 


a 


149— " 


a 


I, 


45, ' 


' 40 — good. 


a 


I, 


45, 


tt 


153- " " 


a 


I, 


45, ' 


' 46 — very good. 


a 


I, 


45, 


a 


158 — good. 


a 


I, 


45, ' 


47 — good. 


a 


I, 


45, 


a 


171— " 



Red and Color No. 52. 



a 



52, and 24- 


-very good. 


52, ' 


' 26- 


-good. 


52, ' 


' 32- 


-very good. 


52, ' 


' 33- 


a a 


52, ' 


' 34- 


a a 


52, ' 


' 37- 


-good. 


52, ' 


' 5o- 


-very good. 


52, ' 


' 60- 


- excellent. 


52, ' 


' 63- 


-very good. 


52, ' 


' 67- 


- good. 


52, ( 


' 7o- 


- very good. 



igs 


I, 


52, 


and 


83- 


— excellent. 


a 


h 


52, 


a 


93- 


— very good 


tt 


I, 


52, 


a 


99- 


— good. 


a 


I, 


52, 


a 


108- 


a 


a 


I, 


52, 


a 


110- 


a 


a 


I, 


52, 


a 


iii - 


— very good 


a 


I, 


52, 


a 


125- 


— excellent. 


a 


I, 


52, 


a 


126- 


— good. 


a 


I, 


52, 


a 


133- 


a 


a 


I, 


52, 


a 


135- 


— excellent. 


tt 


I, 


52, 


a 


139- 


a 



102 



^xwsssSwsSssS 



S^^BBHH 



a 



Figs, i, 52, and 142 — very good. 
1, 52, " 148 — excellent. 
1, 52, " 149 — very good. 



Figs. 1, 52, and 155— very good. 



a 


h 52, 


" I64- 


ii U 


l! 


h 52, 


" 171- 


- excellent 



Red and Color No. 67. 



Figs. 


I 


67, 


and 


26- 


— good. 


Figs. 


I, 


67, 


and 


80- 


- good. 


a 


I, 


67, 


a 


32- 


— very good. 


a 


I, 


67, 




8l- 


-very good 


a 


I, 


67, 


a 


33- 


— good. 


a 


I, 


67, 




I33- 




a 


I, 


67, 


a 


34- 


— very good. 


a 


I, 


67, 




134 — 




a 


I, 


67, 


a 


41- 


— excellent. 


a 


h 


67, 




149 — 




u 


I, 


67, 


a 


47- 


— very good. 


a 


I, 


67, 




I50- 




a 


I 


67, 


a 


52- 


— good. 


a 


I, 


67, 




159- 




a 


I, 


67, 


a 


7i- 


a 


a 


I, 


67, 




162 — 














Red and C< 


3lor No. 


75. 








Figs. 


I 


75, 


and 


16- 


-good. 


Figs. 


I, 


75, 


and 


133- 


- very good 


a 


I 


75, 


a 


26- 


a 


a 


I, 


75, 


a 


I44- 


a a 


a 


I 


75, 


a 


32- 


- very good. 


a 


I, 


75, 


a 


I49 — 


a a 


u 


I 


75, 


a 


33- 


a a 


a 


I, 


75, 


a 


162 — 


a a 


a 


I 


75, 


a 


34- 


U (( 


a 


I, 


75, 


a 


170 — 


a a 






• 






Red and C 


olor No. 


83. 








Figs 


I 


, 83, 


and 26 — 


- good. 


Figs 


I, 


83, 


and 


78- 


- good. 


a 


I 


83, 


a 


32- 


- excellent. 


a 


I, 


83, 


a 


79- 


a 


a 


I 


, 83, 


a 


33- 


-very good. 


a 


I, 


83, 


a 


80- 


- very good 


a 


I 


, 83, 


a 


34- 


- excellent. 


a 


*, 


83, 


a 


81- 


-good. 


a 


I 


83, 


a 


41- 


a 


a 


I, 


83, 


a 


133- 


- very good 


" 


I 


, 83, 


a 


49- 


-good. 


<< 


I, 


83, 


a 


149 — 


a a 


a 


I 


, 83, 


a 


52- 


- excellent. 


a 


I, 


83, 


a 


158- 


a a 


a 


I 


, 83, 


a 


7 1 - 


a 


a 


I, 


83, 


a 


161- 


-good. 


a 


I 


, 83, 


a 


77- 


- good. 


a 


I, 


83, 


a 


171- 


- very good 



111 : 



IO' 



- 1 







Red and Color No. no. 



Figs, i 



no 
no 
no 
no 
no 
no 
no 
no 



and 32 — very good. 
« 4I _ « 

47— good. 

" 52- " 

" 71- " 

" 80 — very good. 

" 104 — good. 

" 133— ver Y good- 



Figs. 1, no, and 135 — very good. 



no, 


139- 


it » * 


no, ' 


' 148- 


u u 


no, ' 


' 149- 


-very good 


no, ' 


' *55- 


a u 


no, ' 


1 162- 


-good. 


no, ' 


' 171- 


-very good 


no, ' 


' 176- 


U it 



Red and Color No. 135. 



Figs. 1, 135, and 16 — good. 



h 


135, ' 


' 26- 


a 


I, 


135, ' 


' 32- 


-excellent. 


h 


*35> ' 


' 33- 


-very good 


h 


i35, ' 


' 34- 


-excellent. 


h 


135) ' 


' 4i- 


u 


I, 


i35, ' 


' 44- 


-very good 


I, 


i35, ' 


' 52- 


-excellent. 


I, 


i35, 


' 7 1 - 


-very good 


I, 


i35, ' 


' 80- 


-excellent. 



Figs. 1, 135, and 81 — very good. 



I, 


135, ' 


' 104 — good. 


I, 


*35> ' 


' 133— ver y good 


I, 


135, ' 


< 149- " " 


I, 


135, ' 


< 151- « « 


I, 


135, ' 


' 155- " " 


I, 


!35, ' 


< 158- » " 


I, 


135, ' 


' 159- " " 


I, 


135, ' 


' 162— " 


" I) 


135, ' 


' 164 — good. 



Red and Color No. 139. 



igs. 


I) 


139, and 16- 


-very good. 


Figs. 


I 


139, 


and 41 — excellent. 


a 


I, 


139, " 26- 


a a 


a 


I, 


139, 


" 44 — very good 


a 


h 


139, " 32- 


- excellent. 


(i 


I, 


139, 


" 52 — excellent. 


u 


I, 


139, " 33- 


-very good. 


u 


I, 


139, 


" 71 — very good 


a 


h 


I 39» " 34- 


- excellent. 


11 


I, 


139, 


" 80 — excellent. 



104 



SiWiS^SSSs 



Figs, i, 139, and 81 — very good. 
i, 139) " 104— good. 



a 



139) " T 33— ver Y good. 
139, " 149- " " 



Figs. 1, 139, and 155— very good. 



139) " 158— good. 



139) 



<< 



a 



, 139) " T 59— 

" 162— " 



Red and Color No. 148. 



Figs. 1, 148, and 16 — good. 



(< 


I, I48, ' 


' 26- 


u 


u 


I, I48, < 


' 32- 


- excellent. 


It 


I, I48, ' 


' 33- 


-very good 


a 


I, I48, ' 


' 34- 


- excellent. 


ii 


I, I48, 


' 4i- 


a 


a 


I, I48, ' 


' 44- 


- very good 


a 


I, I48, ' 


' 52- 


- excellent. 



Figs. 1, 148, and 71 — very good. 



h 


148, < 


' 77- 


u u 


h 


148, < 


1 80- 


-excellent. 


h 


148, < 


' 81- 


-very good 


I, 


148, ' 


' 104- 


-good. 


I, 


148, ' 


' 133- 


-excellent. 


I, 


148, < 


' 149- 


-very good 


h 


148, < 


' 171- 


it a 



In the following lists of three-color combinations the principal 
color is yellow. 

Yellow and Blue. 

Figs. 2, 3, and 31 — very good. 



igs 


.2, 


3, and 1 - 


- excellent. 


u 


2, 


3) ' 


' 8 — 


-very good 


u 


2, 


3, ' 


' 10 — 


a a 


<< 


2, 


3) ' 


' 11 — 


a a 


a 


2, 


3) ' 


' 12 — 


U ii 


u 


2, 


3) ' 


' 17- 


(l a 


(( 


2, 


3, ' 


' 18- 


a a 


a 


2, 


3) ' 


' 19- 


a a 


a 


2, 


3, ' 


' 23- 


- good. 


u 


2, 


3) ' 


' 27- 


a 


a 


2, 


3, ' 


' 28- 


-very good 


a 


2, 


3) ' 


' 29- 


a a 


a 


2, 


3) ' 


' 30- 


- excellent. 



2, 


3) ' 


< 32 _ « a 


2, 


3, ' 


33 — good- 


2, 


3) ' 


' 34 — very good. 


2, 


3) 


' 35- " " 


2, 


3) ' 


' 36 — excellent. 


2, 


3) ' 


' 49 — good- 


2, 


3, ' 


' 5i- " 


2, 


3) ' 


' 52- " 


2, 


3» ' 


< 62— " 


2, 


3, ' 


' 66 — " 


2, 


3) ' 


' 68— " 


" 2, 


3) ' 


< 72- « 



105 



I 



Figs. 2, 3, and 73 — very good. 









2, 


3, ' 


' 76— " 


2, 


3, ' 


80 — excellent. 


2, 


3, ' 


81 — very good 


2, 


3, ' 


' 89— " 


2, 


3, ' 


95 — g° od - 


2, 


3, ' 


' 107— " 


2, 


3, ' 


' 113- " 


2, 


3, ' 


' 115- " 


2, 


3, ' 


< 120— " 


2, 


3, ' 


' 121 — very good 


2, 


3, ' 


' 123- " " 


2, 


3, ' 


' 124 — -good. 



k igs. 2, 


3, 


anc 


■ I2 7 — good. 


a 


2, 


3, 


a 


131- " 


a 


2, 


3, 


a 


133 — -very good 


a 


2, 


3, 


a 


134- " " 


a 


2, 


3, 


a 


135 — excellent. 


a 


2, 


3, 


a 


140 — very good 


a 


.2, 


3, 


a 


141 — good. 


u 


2, 


3, 


a 


145- " 


a 


2, 


3, 


u 


146— " 


a 


2, 


3, 


it 


149- « 


u 






it 


( t 




2, 


3, 




150 — 


a 


2, 


3, 


it 


151- " 


u 


2, 


3, 


ti 


156- « 



Figs. 2 



Yellow and Purple. 



6, and 11 



6, 
6, 
6, 
6, 
6, 
6, 
6, 
6, 
6, 
6, 



12- 
21 

49 

50 

5 1 - 

52- 

53- 

57- 

7i- 
80 ■ 



very good, 
good. 



a 



•very good, 
excellent, 
very good. 

tt a 

good. 

■very good, 
good, 
very good. 



Figs. 2 
2 



a 
a 
a 
a 
a 
a 
u 
it 
it 
u 



6, and 83 — - excellent. 

6, " 92 — -good. 

6, " 101 — 

6, " 117- 

6, " 118- 

6, " 119- 

6, " 134- 

6, " 138- 

6, " 148 

6, " 150- 

6, " 154- 



■very good. 

a n 

u it 

a u 

excellent. 

u 
very good. 



Yellow and Rose Lake. 



Figs. 2, 8, and 11 — excellent. 
2, 8, " 12 — very good. 



11 

tt 



2, 8, 



24 



Figs. 2, 


8, and 32 


" 2, 


8, " 37 


" 2, 


8, " 49 



very good. 



106 



igs. 2, 8, and 50 — excellent. 


Figs. 2 


8, and 113 — very good 


" 2, 8, ' 


51 — very good. 


2j 


8, ' 


' 114 — excellent. 


" 2, 8, ' 


52 — good. 


2, 


8, ' 


' 115 — very good 


" 2, 8, ' 


57 — excellent. 


" 2, 


8, ' 


' 118— " 


" 2, 8, ' 


60 — very good. 


" 2, 


8, ' 


' 134- " " 


" 2, 8, ' 


63 — ■ excellent. 


" 2, 


8, ' 


' 140— " 


" 2, 8, ' 


' 83- " 


2, 


8, ' 


' 148 — ■ excellent. 


" 2, 8, ' 


' 108 — very good. 


" 2, 


8, ' 


' 150 — good. 


" 2, 8, ' 


' no— " 


2, 


8, < 


' 156- " 


" 2, 8, ' 


< IIT _ « 


2, 


8, ' 


' 171— " 



Yellow and Gray. 



igs. 2, 


11, a] 


ad 12 — -good. 


Figs. 2 


11, and 66- 


— good. 


2, 


11, 


" 15 — very good. 


" 2, 


ii, 


" 83- 


— very good 


2, 


11, 


' 16 — good. 


2, 


ii, 


' 84- 


— good. 


2, 


11, 


" 17 — very good. 


2, 


ii, 


' 89- 


a 


2, 


11, 


" 18 — good. 


2, 


ii, 


93- 


- excellent. 


2, 


11, 


' 24- — -very good. 


" 2, 


11, 


94- 


-very good 


2, 


11, 


u 26 _ u 


2, 


11, 


95- 


a a 


2, 


11, 


u 2; _ u 


2, 


11, 


< 98- 


u a 


2, 


11, 


" 28— " 


" 2, 


11, ' 


99- 


-good. 


2, 


11, 


' 30- " " 


" 2, 


11, 


' 100- 


— very good 


2, 


11, 


34 _ g ood. 


" 2, 


11, ' 


' 107- 


-good. 


2, 


11, 


' 35 — ver y g° o( i- 


2; 


11, 


' 111- 


a 


2, 


11, 


" 36- " " 


" 2, 


11, 


' 112- 


-very good 


" 2, 


11, 


' 37- " " 


" 2, 


11, 


' 114- 


-good. 


2, 


11, 


' 42 — good. 


2, 


11, 


' 115- 


(i 


2, 


11, 


' 5o- " 


2j 


11, 


' 116- 


-very good 


2, 


11, 


' 59 — excellent. 


" 2, 


11, 


' 123- 


-good. 


2, 


11, ' 


' 60 — very good. 


2, 


11, 


' 124- 


a 


2, 


11, 


< 61— " 


" 2, 


11, 


' 125- 


-very good 


2, 


11, ' 


' 62 — good. 


" 2, 


11, 


' 126- 


-excellent. 


2, 


11, 


' 63- " 


2, 


11, 


' 133- 


-good. 



i 



mss? 



■ 






107 



' 






igs. 2, 


II, 


and 


134 — g° od - 


Figs 


2, 


11 


and 


148 — excellent. 


2, 


II, 


a 


135 — excellent. 




2, 


11, 


a 


149 — very good. 


2, 


II, 


a 


138- << 




2, 


11, 


(t 


150- " " 


2, 


II, 


u 


139 — very good. 




2, 


11, 


u 


151 — excellent. 


" 2, 


II, 


a 


140 — good. 




2, 


11 


a 


154- " 


2, 


II, 


a 


143 — excellent. 




2, 


11 


u 


155- " 


2, 


II, 


a 


145— g° od - 




2, 


11 


u 


156 — very good. 


" 2, 


II, 


a 


147 — very good. 




2, 


11 


u 


171— " 



Yellow and Black. 



igs. 2, 


12, 


and 


l8- 


— very good. 


Figs. 2, 


12, 


and 


113 — good. 


" 2, 


12, 


u 


19- 


— good. 


2, 


12, 


a 


116— " 


" 2, 


12, 


u 


28- 


— very good. 


" 2, 


12, 


a 


117— " 


" 2, 


12, 


a 


29- 


— good. 


2, 


12, 


u 


119— " 


" 2, 


12, 


u 


30- 


— excellent. 


" 2, 


12, 


a 


120— " 


" 2, 


12, 


a 


31- 


— very good. 


2, 


12, 


u 


124 — very good 


" 2, 


12, 


<< 


35- 


— good. 


2, 


12, 


a 


125 — good. 


" 2, 


12, 


a 


36- 


— very good. 


" 2, 


12, 


u 


126— " 


" 2, 


12, 


a 


37- 


a a 


" 2, 


12, 


u 


133 — ver Y good 


" 2, 


12, 


a 


42- 


— good. 


" 2, 


12, 


a 


134- " " 


" 2, 


12, 


u 


57- 


— very good. 


" 2, 


12, 


a 


135 — excellent. 


" 2, 


12, 


a 


59- 


a u 


2, 


12, 


a 


138- " 


" 2, 


12, 


a 


61- 


u << 


" 2, 


12, 


a 


139- " 


" 2, 


12, 


a 


63- 


— good. 


" 2, 


12, 


<< 


140 — very good 


" 2, 


12, 


a 


73- 


— very good. 


" 2, 


12, 


a 


143 — excellent. 


" 2, 


12, 


u 


76- 


— good. 


" 2, 


12, 


u 


145 — very good 


" 2, 


12, 


a 


81- 


— very good. 


" 2, 


12, 


a 


147 — 


" 2, 


12, 


a 


83- 


a u 


" 2, 


12, 


a 


148 — excellent. 


" 2 ; 


12, 


a 


93- 


— good. 


" 2 


12, 


a 


151 — very good 


" 2 


12, 


a 


95- 


— very good. 


" 2, 


12, 


<< 


154- " " 


" 2, 


12, 


a 


96- 


CI u 


" 2 . 


12, 


ii 


155- " " 


" 2, 


12, 


a 


100- 


— good. 


" 2 


12, 


a 


156- " " 


" 2 


12, 


U 


112- 


u 


" 2 


12, 


a 


171— " 



108 






MMMgagBnaa 






r#5 'iskr*> 'i^Pi "fet*!) 'U&i 'i&rPt 'Ur*> 'Ur9^ 'Ur^t 'fe»5 'Hr9^ - fe?r*> 'Or+i 'fe»5 '■yr*! "fe»> "fer»J "ife^ 'fe*> 'fe^i 'fe*i - fe*> -, fe*> 'fer^s 'ii* * 




r»b - ^r»!i '-yr»i 'fe^i 'i&*i - fe?r#!> ' , fe*> '-yr»!> 'fe*> '45^ "-fe^i 'fe*> 'fe* "feir^ %k9> - -s&*> '■kk9> "U&, '•££♦) "fe^ "fer^ -v fe*i "fe*> "fer*) 'fe^i 



I HE BED AND CYLINDER are each 
driven by a crank, and there are no 
springs required to help reverse the motion of 
the bed. The whole movement is as simple 
and durable as an ordinary train of gears. 
We guarantee the movement to run perfectly 
smooth, and without a particle of jar at any 
point ; to run faster and last longer than any 
other movement now on the market. With 
proper care there is not a single part that will 
give out or need repairing; and we want to 
call special attention to the fact that there are 
no cams, cam -gears, eccentrics, or any queer 
shaped parts about it, but that each and all of 
the parts are straight or round, and can be 
made in any first-class machine shop without 
special tools. 

There is no lost motion between the bed and 
cylinder during the printing stroke, and the 
register is perfect at all speeds. 

The bed is supported, under the line of im- 
pression, by four large rollers, journaled in 
stands which are fastened to a rigid box-stay 
that can not spring or give in the least degree. 



The Huber Or 

Super R<?a 




Movement f a 
TWO OR THREE ROLLERS. FOUR TRA< 

Front Delivery, Table Distribution. 



VAN ALLENS & BOUGHTON, Selling Agents, 

59 Ann St., and 17 to 23 Rose St., New Yor 



'kk*) M£»i 'ik+> '^k9i "4^*5 - fe»b 'fe*> "^r»i "fe»> - fe*i 'ik9i *Uc*> ■■*£♦> '4^ "U&> "Ur*> '^k+> "$k9i "fe*} "%k9> - fe»> '■ik9s '<^* * 





-y^D --y^ ■%&•> 'U&i '4^*5 "fe»i - fe*b 'fe*> "U&> *kk&> ~^9i 'ferft 'U&s "fe*> 'ik+> "U&i '^9i "U&> ''*£*!> "ik9> 'Vi9i 'feV»> 'fer^ 



I 



#HPP' 



^HH 




link Movement 
cal Jobber 




Pa 



rk 



d July 22, 1890. 

BOX FRAME, 
ack Delivery, Table or Drum Distribution. 



NO SPRINGS. 



H. W. THORNTON, Western Manager, 

No. 256 Dearborn Street, Chicago, 111. 



Good Points Embodied in Press. 



I HE cylinder never comes to a full stop 
when the press is in operation, but keeps 
moving slowly, when the bed is reversing, 
until the speed of the bed is equal, when it 
increases in unison with the bed. The sheet is 
taken by the grippers when the cylinder is mov- 
ing slowly, — an important point in favor of 
perfect register. 

Having no complicated cam or stop motions 
to get out of order or limit the speed of the 
press, we guarantee every machine to print 
twenty-two hundred sheets per hour, when 
properly fed, in perfect register and without 
jar or extra wear. 

The cylinder can be tripped at the will of 
the feeder and up to the moment when the 
sheet is taken by the grippers. 

The side-frames are of the box pattern, also, 
and every part of the machine is constructed 
with an eye to great strength and durability. 
The sheets are delivered in front of the cylin- 
der, clean side to the fly, which is positive and 
noiseless in its action. 



.'■• 


h 


























































































■ 








.:■■; 








n 


<h 


fe.-*> 


%k*> 


■fer#> 


•fer^ 


•fer*> 


•fer*> 


- fer»> 


t£»5 


•fe.-*> 


■fer#l 


fer*, 


•fer*> 


•fer*) 


v.-*. 


•^•5 


•fer»i 


■^r*> 


%k9i 


•fer»i 


■fer*) 


■fer* 


•fer*> 


•fer#5 


•fer*> 


•feri 



402 

2, 3, 5, and 34. 



^1 






■ 



■ 



: 



, ' I 



- 



■ 

HI 






- ! 



■:. ■/. 



Yellow and Color No. 34. 



Figs. 2 


, 34, and 28 — good. Fi 


gs. 2, 


34, and in — very good 


2 


34, ' 


30 — excellent. 


2, 


34, ' 


' 117— " 


2 


34, ' 


32 — very good. 


2, 


34, ' 


' 119— " 


2 


34, ' 


' 37- " " 


2, 


34, ' 


< 125- " " 


2 


34, ' 


< 49- « « 


2, 


34, ' 


' 133- " " 


2 


34, ' 


52- " " 


2, 


34, ' 


' 134 — good. 


2 


34, ' 


53— good. 


2, 


34, ' 


' 135 — excellent. 


2 


34, ' 


57 — excellent. 


2, 


34, ' 


' 139- " 


" 2 


34, ' 


60 — - very good, 


2, 


34, ' 


' 142 — ■ very good 


" 2 


34, ' 


< 63- " " 


2, 


34, ' 


' 148 — excellent. 


" 2 


34, ' 


67 — excellent. 


2, 


34, ' 


' 149 — good. 


2] 


34, ' 


68 — very good. 


2, 


34, ' 


' 150- " 


2 


34, ' 


76 — good. 


2, 


34, ' 


' 151 — very good 


2, 


34, ' 


83 — excellent. 


2, 


34, ' 


' 155- " " 


2] 


34, ' 


' 108— " < 


' 2, 


34, ' 


1 171— " 






Yellow and Color No. 36. 



1 



m 

i 

I; 



■ 






igs. 2, 36, and 24 — very good. Fi 


gs. 2, 


36, and 83 — excellent. 


" 2, 36, ' 


t 32 _ u u 


2, 


36, ( 


85 — very good 


2, 36, ' 


' 37' — -excellent. ' 


2, 


36, ' 


' 108 — excellent. 


2, 36, ' 


49 — good- 


2, 


36, < 


' in — very good 


" 2, 36, ' 


' 52 — very good. ' 


2, 


36, ' 


' 117— " 


" 2, 36, ' 


' 53— good. 


2, 


36, ( 


' 118 — good. 


" 2, 36, ' 


' 57 — excellent. ' 


2, 


36, ' 


' 119 — very good 


2, 36, ' 


' 58 — -very good. ' 


2, 


36, ' 


< 125- " " 


2, 36, ' 


i 6q _ « « < 


2, 


36, ' 


' 133- " " 


" 2, 36, ' 


< 63- " " 


2, 


36, ' 


1 134- " " 


2, 36, ' 


' 67 — excellent. ' 


2, 


36, ( 


' 135 — excellent. 


2, 36, ' 


' 68 — very good. ' 


2, 


36, < 


' 137 — good. 


2, 36, ' 


t ?0 _ a 


2, 


36, ' 


' 139 — excellent. 


2, 36, ' 


' 77- " " 


2, 


36, ' 


' 142 — very good 


" 2, 36, ' 


' 82 — good. ' 


' 2, 


36, ' 


' 148 — excellent. 



109 



I 



■ 



1 1 






■ 



: 






Figs. 2, 36, and 149 — good. 
2, 36, " 150- " 
2, 3 6 > " 151— very good. 



a 



Figs. 2, 36, and 155— very good. 
" 2, 36, " 158 — good. 



36, 



a 



171 — very good. 



lgS. 2 


52, and 15 


" 2, 


52, ' 


' 17 


" 2 > 


52, ' 


' 30 


2, 


52, ' 


' 34 


" 2, 


52, ' 


' 35 


" 2, 


52, ' 


' 36 


" 2, 


52, ' 


' 37 


" 2, 


52, ' 


' 50 


" 2, 


52, ' 


' 53 


" 2, 


52, ' 


' 57 


" 2, 


52, ' 


' 59 


" 2, 


52, ' 


' 60 


" 2, 


52, ' 


' 61 


" 2, 


52, ' 


< 62 


" 2, 


52, ' 


' 63 


" 2, 


52, ' 


1 67 


" 2, 


52, ' 


< 68 


" 2, 


52, ' 


' 77 


" 2, 


52, ' 


' 82 


" 2, 


52, ' 


' 83 


" 2, 


52, ' 


' 84 


" 2, 


52, ' 


' 85 


" 2, 


52, ' 


' 93 



Yellow and Color No. 52. 

- very good. 

- good, 
-very good, 
-good. 

a 

-very good. 

- excellent, 
-very good, 
-good, 
-very good. 

- excellent. 

- very good, 
-good, 
-very good. 

a ii 

- good. 



a 



excellent, 
good, 
very good. 
■ excellent. 



igs. 2, 


52, and 94 — 


- very good 


" 2, 


52, 


95- 


- good. 


" 2, 


52, 


99- 


a 


" 2, 


52, 


' 100 — 


a 


" 2, 


52, 


' 108 — 


a 


" 2, 


52, 


" no — 


a 


" 2, 


52, 


' in — 


-very good 


2, 


52, 


' 116 — 


a a 


" 2, 


52, 


' 125- 


a a 


" 2, 


52, 


' 126 — 


- excellent. 


2, 


52, 


' 134 — 


a 


2, 


52, 


' 135- 


a 


" 2, 


52, 


' 138- 


a 


" 2, 


52, 


' 139 — 


a 


" 2, 


52, 


' 142 — 


-very good 


" 2, 


52, 


' 143- 


-excellent. 


" 2 , 


52, 


' 148 — 


a 


" 2, 


52, 


' 150- 


-very good 


2, 


52, 


' 151- 




" 2, 


52, 


' 154- 




" 2, 


52, 


' x 55- 




" 2, 


52, 


" 158- 




" 2, 


52, 


' 171- 





Yellow and Color No. 59. 



Figs. 2, 59, and 49 — very good. 



2, 59, 



a 



52 — 



Figs. 2, 



59> and 57 



2, 59, 



58- 



very good, 
good. 



no 



Figs- 2, 59> an( l 83 



a 

a 



2, 59, 
2, 59, 
2, 59, 



u 



85 

117 

119 

59, " 134 



■very good. 

a a 

good. 

a 

• excellent. 



Figs. 2, 59, and 142 

2, 59, " 143 

2, 59, " 148- 

2, 59, " 150 

2, 59, " 154 



a 

a 



very good. 

excellent, 
very good. 



u 









Yellow and Color No 


. 67. 




%s 


. 2, 


67, and 17 — very good. Fi 


gs. 2, 


67, and 73 — very good 


a 


2, 


67, ' 


< lg _ a a < 


2, 


67, ' 


76 — good. 


a 


2, 


67, ' 


' 23 — good. ' 


2, 


67, ' 


80 — very good 


<< 


2, 


67, ' 


< 27- " 


2, 


67, ' 


81- — excellent. 


a 


2, 


67, ' 


' 28— " 


2, 


67, ' 


89 — very good 


<< 


2, 


67, ' 


' 30 — very good. 


2, 


67, ' 


94 — good. 


a 


2, 


67, ' 


' 31 — good. 


2, 


67, ' 


' 95- " 


u 


2, 


67, ' 


' 32 — very good. 


2, 


67, ' 


' 107— " 


u 


2, 


67, ' 


' 34- " " 


2, 


67, ' 


' 116 — -excellent. 


a 


2, 


67, ' 


' 35 • — excellent. 


2, 


67, ' 


' 120 — good. 


a 


2, 


67, ' 


' 36- 


2, 


67, ' 


' 124— " 


a 


2, 


67, ' 


' 52 — good. 


2, 


67, ' 


' I 33 — very good 


a 


2, 


67, ' 


<• 60— " < 


2, 


67, ' 


' 140— " " 


a 


2, 


67, ' 


' 62 — very good. 


2, 


67, ' 


' 145- " " 


a 


2, 


67, ' 


' 66— " " 


2, 


67, ' 


' 149 — good. 


a 


2, 


67, ' 


< ;i _ « « < 


2, 


67, ' 


' 156- " 


(( 


2, 


67, ' 


' 72 — good. ' 


2, 


67, ' 


' 168— " 






ill 






m 









i 



m 



I 



■ 



Yellow and Color No. 81. 



Figs. 2, 81, and 1 — good. 

3 — very good. 
6 — good. 
2, 8l, " 7 - << 



" 2, 8l, " 

" 2, 8l, " 
<< 



Figs. 2, 81, and 11 — excellent. 

good, 
■very good. 



in 



u 



a 



8l, 



15 
2, 8l, << I 7 
2, 8l, " 18 















' 




Figs. 2 

2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 

2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 



8i 
8i 
8i 
8i 
8i 
8i 
8i 
8i 
8i 
8i 
8i 
8i 
8i 
8i 
8i 
8i 
8i 
8i 
8i 
8i 
8i 
8i 
8i 
8i 
8i 
8i 
8i 
8i 
8i 
8i 
8i 
8i 
8i 
8i 
8i 
8i 



and 24 
26 

27 
30 
3i 
32 
34 
35 
36- 

37' 
42 

49 
52- 

53 
54- 

57' 
58' 

59 

60 • 

61 • 
62 

63 
64 

67 

68 

70 

7i 

76 

77 
78 
80 

82- 

83 
84 
93 
94 



-good, 
-very good. 

• excellent. 

■ very good, 
good. 

-very good. 

u a 

■ excellent, 
-good. 

■ excellent, 
•very good. 

•good. 

- excellent, 
•very good. 

- excellent. 

a 
a 

■ very good. 

- excellent, 
-very good. 

• excellent. 

• very good. 






a 



good. 

very good, 
good. 
• very good. 

■ excellent, 
very good. 

11 a 

good. 



igs. 2, 


8l 


, and 95 — good. 


" 2 ) 


8l 


, " 96 — excellent. 


" 2, 


8l 


" 98 — -good. 


" 2, 


8l 


" 99 — very good. 


" 2, 


8l 


" 100— " " 


" 2, 


8l 


" 101 — good. 


2, 


8l 


" 108 — very good. 


" 2, 


81 


" no- — -good. 


" 2, 


8l 


" in — very good. 


" 2, 


8l 


" 112 — good. 


" 2, 


8l 


" 113 — very good. 


" 2, 


8l 


" 115- " " 


" 2, 


8l 


" 116— " " 


" 2, 


8l 


" 117— " " 


2, 


8l 


, " 119— " " 


" 2, 


8l 


" 120 — good. 


" 2, 


8l 


" 121 —excellent. 


" 2, 


8l 


" i*5- 


" 2, 


8l 


, " 126 — 


" 2, 


8l 


" x 33— g° od - 


" 2, 


8l 


" 134 — very good. 


" 2, 


8l 


" 135 — - excellent. 


" 2, 


8l 


" 138 — very good. 


" 2, 


8l 


" 139 — excellent. 


" 2, 


8l 


" 140 — good. 


" 2, 


8l 


" 142 — very good. 


" 2, 


8l 


" 143- " " 


" 2, 


8l 


144 


" 2, 


8l 


147 — 


" 2, 


8l 


" 148 — excellent. 


" 2, 


8l 


" 151 — very good. 


" 2, 


8l 


" 154 — go° d - 


" 2, 


8l 


" 155— ver y g° od - 


" 2, 


8l 


" 156 — good. 


" 2, 


8l 


, " 161 — very good. 


" 2, 


8l 


" 171— " 



112 



a ^^^-' : ' ; v-^v 



.... ■ 



V 



II 














Yellow 


and 


Color 


No. 83. 




Figs 


. 2 


83, 


and 15 — very good. 


Figs 


. 2 


, 83, and 78 — good. 


a 


2j 


83, 


a 


16 — excellent. 


a 


2 


83, ' 


80 — ■ very good 


u 


2, 


83, 


a 


17 — very good. 


a 


2 


83, ' 


< 81— " 


a 


2, 


83, 


a 


18— " 




a 


2j 


83, ' 


' 84 — good. 


it 


2, 


83, 


i( 


27- " ' 




a 


2 


83, ' 


89 — very good 


u 


2, 


83, 


a 


28— " ' 




14 


2, 


83, ' 


' 94- " " 


u 


2, 


83, 


u 


30- " ' 




a 


2, 


83, ' 


' 95- " " 


a 


2, 


83, 


a 


3i- " ' 




a 


2 


83, ' 


' 100— " 


u 


2, 


83, 


a 


32- " ' 




a 


2 


83, ' 


' 107— " 


a 


2, 


83, 


a 


34- " ' 




a 


2 


83, ' 


' 112 — -good. 


u 


2j 


83, 


u 


35- " ' 




a 


2 


83, ' 


' 114 — very good 


<< 


2, 


83, 


a 


36- " ' 




a 


2 


83, ' 


' 115 — excellent. 


a 


2j 


83, 


u 


49- " ' 




a 


2j 


83, ' 


' 116 — 


a 


2, 


83, 


a 


50- " < 




a 


2, 


83, ' 


' 117 — very good 


U 


2, 


83, 


a 


51 — excellent. 


a 


2j 


83, ' 


' 123- " " 


a 


2, 


83, 


a 


52 — very good. 


a 


2, 


83, ' 


' 124 — excellent. 


ii 


2, 


83, 


a 


59- " " 


a 


2, 


83, ' 


' 133— very good. 


u 


2, 


83, 


a 


61 — good. 


a 


2 


83, ' 


134 — 


a 


2, 


83, 


a 


66 — " 


a 


2j 


83, ' 


' 138— " 


u 


2, 


83, 


a 


72- " 


a 


2, 


83, ' 


' 140— " 


u 


2, 


83- 


a 


73 — -very good. 


a 


2, 


83, ' 


' 143- " " 


a 


2, 


83, 


a 


76 — good. 


a 


2, 


83, ' 


' 145— g° od - 


a 


2, 


83, 


a 


77- " 




a 


2, 


83, ' 


' 150- " 



Yellow and Color No. 135. 



igs 


■ 2, 


135, and 


1 — very good. 


Figs 


• 2, 


135, and 


■27- 


-very good 


a 


2, 


135, " 


3- " " 


a 


2, 


*35> " 


28- 


-good. 


a 


2, 


135, " 


« . n << 


a 


2, 


135, " 


30- 


- very good 


a 


2, 


135, " 


8 — good. 


a 


2, 


135, " 


3 1 - 


<< a 


a 


2, 


135, " 


1 1 • — very good. 


u 


2, 


135, " 


32- 


a a 


a 


2, 


135, " 


17 — good. 


a 


2, 


J 35, " 


34- 


a a 


u ' 


2, 


135, " 


18 — very good. 


a 


2, 


J 35, " 


35- 


a a 


u 


2, 


135, " 


23— good- 


u 


2, 


I 35> " 


36- 


- excellent. 






■ 
■ 

(■ 

B 

li 



^ 



113 






Figs. 2, 135, and 42 — good. 



2, 


i35> 


43- 


v w 


2, 


i35, ' 


49- 


-very good. 


2, 


135) ' 


' 52- 


-good. 


2, 


i35) ' 


' 62- 


-very good. 


2, 


135) ' 


< 66- 


U (( 


2, 


135) ' 


' 72- 


-good. 


2, 


135) 


' 73- 


-very good. 


2, 


i35) 


1 76- 


-good. 


2, 


135) ' 


' 80- 


-very good. 


2, 


x 35) 


' 81- 


-excellent. 


2, 


135) ' 


' 89- 


—good. 


2, 


135) 


95- 


-very good. 


2, 


135) ' 


' 107- 


-good. 


2, 


135) ' 


' 112- 


11 



2, 


135, and 1.13- 


— good. 


2, 


135) ' 


' 116- 


—very good 


2, 


135) ' 


' 120- 


-good. 


2, 


135) ' 


' 121- 


-very good 


2, 


135) ' 


' 133- 


-good. 


2, 


135) ' 


' 124- 


-very good 


2, 


i35) ' 


' 133- 


a a 


2, 


135) ' 


' 134- 


-good. 


2, 


135) ' 


' 140- 


a 


2, 


135) ' 


' 141- 


a 


2, 


135, 


' 145- 


a 


2, 


135) ' 


' 149- 


-very good 


2, 


135) ' 


' ^s 1 - 


U it 


2, 


135) ' 


' 156- 


-good. 


2, 


135) ' 


' 168- 


u 



Yellow and Color No. 138. 



Figs. 2, 138, and 6 — very good. 



Figs. 2, 138, and 80 — -very good. 



2, 138, ' 


' 11 — excellent. 


2, 


138, ' 


83— good. 


2, 138, 


' 12 — very good. 


2, 


138, ' 


' 117— " 


2, 138, ' 


' 41— " " 


2, 


138, ' 


' 121 — very goo 


2, 138, ' 


' 47— g° od - 


2, 


138, ' 


' 134— go° d - 


2, 138, ' 


' 49 — excellent. 


2, 


138, ' 


' 142 — very goo 


2, 138, 


' 51 — very good. 


2, 


138, ' 


' 150- " " 


2, 138, ' 


' 52- " " 


2, 


138, ' 


' 154- " " 


" 2, 138, < 


' 63— good. 


2, 


138, ' 


' 158 — good. 


2, 138, 


' 71 — very good. 


2, 


138, ' 


' 161 — -very goo 


2, 138, ' 


' 77— g° od - 


2, 


138, ' 


' 171— " " 



Yellow and Color No. 148. 



Figs. 2, 148, and 1 — very good. 
2, 148, " 8- 



u 



(.(. 



Figs. 2, 148, and 10 — good. 
" 2, 148, " 11 — very good. 



114 






Figs 


. 2 


, 148, and 12 — good. 


Figj 


u 2 


, 148, 


anc 


J J — very good 


a 


2 


, 148, " 17 — very good. 


a 


2 


, 148, 


a 


80— " 


(< 


2 


, 148, " 18— " " 


a 


2 


, 148, 


a 


81 — excellent. 


it 


2 


, 148, " 19 — -good. 


a 


2 


148, 


tt 


84 — -good. 


a 


2 


, 148, " 20— " 


a 


2 


148, 


a 


89— " 


a 


2 


, 148, " 23- " 


a 


2 


148, 


tt 


95— very good 


a 


2 


, 148, " 27 — very good. 


a 


2 


148, 


a 


107— " " 


a 


2 


148, " 28— " " 


a 


2 


148, 


a 


112 — ^good. 


a 


2 


148, " 29 — good. 


a 


2 


148, 


a 


113- " 


a 


2 


148, " 30 — very good. 


a 


2 


148, 


a 


115 — very good 


a 


2 


148, " 31- " " 


it 


2 


148, 


a 


116 — excellent. 


a 


2 


148, " 32- " " 


it 


2 


148, 


a 


119 — good. 


a 


2, 


148, « 34- " « 


it 


2 


148, 


it 


120— " 


a 


2 


148, " 35 — excellent. 


a 


2 


148, 


tt 


123 — very good 


tt 


2 


148, » 36- » 


tt 


2 


148, 


a 


124— " " 


tt 


2j 


148, " 49 — very good. 


tt 


2j 


148, 


a 


1 3 3 — g° 0( i- 


it 


2, 


I 48, 5 1 — 


a 


2, 


148, 


a 


134- " 


a 


2j 


x 48, 52 — 


a 


2, 


148, 


n 


140— " 


a 


2j 


148, " 62— " 


it 


2, 


148, 


a 


145- " 


a 


2, 


148, " 66— good. 


a 


2, 


148, 


a 


146— " 


a 


2, 


148, " 71— " 


a 


2, 


148, 


a 


149- " 


a 


2, 


148, u 72— " 


a 


2, 


148, 


a 


150- " 


a 


2, 


148, " 73 — excellent. 


a 


2> 


148, 


a 


156 — ^very good. 


a 


2, 


148, " 76 — very good. 


a 


2, 


148, 


a 


168 — good. 



In the following lists of three-color combinations the principal 



color is 


blue. 
















Blue 


and Orange. 




Figs. 3, 


4, and 11 - 


— excellent. 




Figs 


3, 


4, and 35 


" 3, 


4, " 12- 


— very good. 




a 


3, 


4, " 36 


" 3, 


4, " 32- 


— good. 




it 


3, 


4, " 39 


" 3, 


4, " 33- 


— very good. 




a 


3, 


4, u 52 


" 3, 


4, " 34" 


a a 




a 


3, 


4, " 53 



very good. 



a 



tt 



a 






w: 



< 



y I 

I 
I 



I 

■ 



— good. 



I 






115 




igs. 3, 


4, 


and 


54- 


— good. 


3, 


4, 




68- 


a 


3) 


4, 




77' 


— very good 


3, 


4, 




79- 


a u 


3, 


4, 




8o- 


— excellent. 


3> 


4, 




8i- 


— very good 


3, 


4) 




108- 


— good. 


3, 


4, 




109- 


— very good 


3> 


4, 




114- 




3, 


4, 




115- 


— good. 


" 3, 


4, 




119- 


a 



Figs. 3, 4, and 122 — very good. 



3, 


4, ' 


' 127- 


a a 


3, 


4, ' 


' 131- 


a u 


3, 


4, ' 


' 132- 


— good. 


3, 


4, ' 


' 135- 


— excellent. 


3, 


4, ' 


' 136- 


— very good 


3, 


4, ' 


' 148- 


a u 


3, 


4, ' 


' I5 1 - 


— good. 


3) 


4, ' 


' 152- 


a 


3, 


4, ' 


' 158- 


— very good 


" 3, 


4, ' 


' 171- 


— good. 



Blue and Vermilion. 



Figs 


3, 


10, 


and 


II- 


— excellent. 




Figs. 3 


10, 


and 107- 


— very good 




3, 


10, 




12- 


— very good. 




3, 


10, 




109- 


a a 




3, 


10, 




33- 


a u 




" 3, 


10, 




114- 


— good. 




3, 


10, 




34- 


a a 




3, 


10, 




117- 


a 




3> 


10, 




4i- 


a a 




3, 


10, 




118- 


a 




3, 


10, 




47- 


— good. 




3, 


10, 




119- 


— very good 




3, 


10, 




49- 


— very good. 




3, 


10, 




121- 


a a 




3, 


10, 




50- 


a u 




3, 


10, 




122- 


a a 




3, 


10, 




5i- 


— good. 




3, 


10, 




123- 


— good. 




3, 


10, 




52- 


— very good. 




3, 


10, 




127- 


— very good 




3) 


10, 




55- 


— good. 




3, 


10, 




131- 


u a 




3, 


10, 




68- 


a 




3, 


10, 




135- 


— excellent. 




3) 


10, 




7i- 


— excellent. 




3, 


10, 




151- 


— very good 




3, 


10, 




77- 


— good. 


• 


3, 


10, 




157- 


u u 




3, 


10, 




79- 


— very good. 




" 3, 


10, 




158- 


— good. 




3, 


10, 




80- 


— good. 




" 3, 


10, 




164- 


a 












Blue 


and Gray. 










Figs 


3, 


ii, 


anc 


L 13- 


— very good. 




Figs. 3, 


ii, 


ar 


Ld 14 — 


-very good. 


u 


3, 


ii, 


u 


13- 


— excellent. 




" 3, 


11, 


< 


17- 


a. a 



116